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    Hi I'm currently a first year mechanical engineering student and I would just like to ask for any advice you can give. Thanks!
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    I like your username. I am not in university, but my advice would be to STAY AHEAD OF THE GAME. That is probably the most important thing. But also, get in good relations with your professors and students so they it's better when you ask them for help and stuff.
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    (Original post by Kiritsugu)
    I like your username. I am not in university, but my advice would be to STAY AHEAD OF THE GAME. That is probably the most important thing. But also, get in good relations with your professors and students so they it's better when you ask them for help and stuff.
    Oh thank you Do you watch it? haha
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    (Original post by ao_no_exorcist21)
    Oh thank you Do you watch it? haha
    Yeah I am eagerly waiting for the second season - it's been announced. Keep up the strong work ethic at uni as you'll have a lot of spare time so self-discipline is key imo.

    Other anime I particularly have enjoyed include:
    Code Geass
    Death Note
    Full Metal Alchemist Brotherhood
    Steins;Gate
    Fate/Zero
    Cowboy Bebop
    Samurai Champloo
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    (Original post by ao_no_exorcist21)
    Hi I'm currently a first year mechanical engineering student and I would just like to ask for any advice you can give. Thanks!
    Last year engineer here...here's my advice:


    1) Most of your peers will want to "take it easy" and "not try hard" but if you want to become great/better than average you will not be this way. Work hard, look for opportunities, try to get internships early on and learn about the various recruitment processes and I promise you will reap the rewards. While everyone else wasted their time partying every weekend and spending ludicrous amounts of money on alcohol...I spent that time working on my CV and looking for opportunities. I volunteered wherever I could and through that met very good contacts. I got a lot of rejections in the beginning and people used to say "why don't you just give up and leave it till graduation" but I learned from my failure in the process and I never gave up. Eventually through perseverance I ended up obtaining a research internship at an ivy league university in the states for 3 months. Not only that, I managed to get my work published in a research paper written by world experts. I say this not to boast but to show you if I can achieve this then so can you if you work hard and don't give up. Now people admire me and ask me all the time how the hell I did that but they don't see the hard work that was put before hand.

    2) Try to understand the engineering principles rather than memorise them this will make you a good engineer.

    3) Take every bit of coursework seriously, every % helps particularly in your 2nd and latter years of study

    4) Also have time to relax...this is important as you don't want to burn yourself out. For me this was gym, hanging out with friends, family etc.

    5) Don't just blindy follow expectations of people/lectures. People will say do an MEng it's what industry now wants blah blah...but the reality is this is not very true. Yes some companies will only employ you if you have an MEng but there aren't that many that do this plus if you get with a good employer chances are they can fund a masters for you out of their own pocket not yours. In summary only do an MEng if you really want to do it (not because the majority of people are doing it) and that having a BEng doesn't make you bad/less employable.

    Can't really think of anything else tbh... if you have any questions feel free to ask

    a10
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    Hi there,
    I am a year 13 student. Just about finished with A levels with one exam to go. As Mechanical engineering first years are similar irrespective of which uni you go to what are your tips to prepare for the first year. What should I do in the summer, anything i can do to get a head start. In terms of internships how can i get ahead of the game? Btw I am doing Maths Physics and Chemistry as A Levels. so as im not doing further maths will i be at a disadvantage?
    I have done C1-C4, M1 and M2 for my maths modules.
    Thanks in advance!
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    (Original post by Mirzs1612)
    Hi there,
    I am a year 13 student. Just about finished with A levels with one exam to go. As Mechanical engineering first years are similar irrespective of which uni you go to what are your tips to prepare for the first year. What should I do in the summer, anything i can do to get a head start. In terms of internships how can i get ahead of the game? Btw I am doing Maths Physics and Chemistry as A Levels. so as im not doing further maths will i be at a disadvantage?
    I have done C1-C4, M1 and M2 for my maths modules.
    Thanks in advance!
    I'm currently a 3rd year mechanical engineering student (on a placement year), here's my advice:

    - core modules in first year I didn't find too bad. However if I could go back: look at what topics you will cover in the maths-heavy modules and go through those. It might be worth doing complex numbers, and studying some of the further maths modules from the A level course. In my opinion this is what people struggled with the most. Secondly, I would definitely recommend having a look at MATLAB or a similar programming package (python), as this is particularly useful in latter years. Don't worry about not doing further maths, neither did I, and I haven't found it to be a problem.

    - regarding internships, apply early. I can't stress this enough. A quick, last minute application is most likely not going to cut it. Not all companies provide summer placements for first years, but some do and in the UK it will most likely be practical. I completed one after my first year which definitely helped me get a full year placement, and it was really good to apply some of the theoretical knowledge to a practical scenario.
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    (Original post by Mirzs1612)
    Hi there,
    I am a year 13 student. Just about finished with A levels with one exam to go. As Mechanical engineering first years are similar irrespective of which uni you go to what are your tips to prepare for the first year. What should I do in the summer, anything i can do to get a head start. In terms of internships how can i get ahead of the game? Btw I am doing Maths Physics and Chemistry as A Levels. so as im not doing further maths will i be at a disadvantage?
    I have done C1-C4, M1 and M2 for my maths modules.
    Thanks in advance!
    Since you haven't done Further Mathematics, I would recommend that you get Further Pure Mathematics by Bostock & Chandler. It will be an invalulable companion for you when you are introduced to concepts from Further Mathematics at university.

    I wouldn't go as far as looking over stuff from the Further Mathematics syllabus during your summer holiday though - just enjoy the break.
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    (Original post by pleasedtobeatyou)
    Since you haven't done Further Mathematics, I would recommend that you get Further Pure Mathematics by Bostock & Chandler. It will be an invalulable companion for you when you are introduced to concepts from Further Mathematics at university.

    I wouldn't go as far as looking over stuff from the Further Mathematics syllabus during your summer holiday though - just enjoy the break.
    Thank you very much

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    (Original post by Surf)
    I'm currently a 3rd year mechanical engineering student (on a placement year), here's my advice:

    - core modules in first year I didn't find too bad. However if I could go back: look at what topics you will cover in the maths-heavy modules and go through those. It might be worth doing complex numbers, and studying some of the further maths modules from the A level course. In my opinion this is what people struggled with the most. Secondly, I would definitely recommend having a look at MATLAB or a similar programming package (python), as this is particularly useful in latter years. Don't worry about not doing further maths, neither did I, and I haven't found it to be a problem.

    - regarding internships, apply early. I can't stress this enough. A quick, last minute application is most likely not going to cut it. Not all companies provide summer placements for first years, but some do and in the UK it will most likely be practical. I completed one after my first year which definitely helped me get a full year placement, and it was really good to apply some of the theoretical knowledge to a practical scenario.
    Thanks alot :-)

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    (Original post by pleasedtobeatyou)
    Since you haven't done Further Mathematics, I would recommend that you get Further Pure Mathematics by Bostock & Chandler. It will be an invalulable companion for you when you are introduced to concepts from Further Mathematics at university.
    How does that book compare to the Stroud Engineering Mathematics and Advanced Engineering Mathematics books?
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    (Original post by Smack)
    How does that book compare to the Stroud Engineering Mathematics and Advanced Engineering Mathematics books?
    Bostock & Chandler certainly does not cover as much scope as Stroud but it should more or less be sufficient for first year Engineering Mathematics courses at university. Stroud should be good for up to second year since it covers div, grad, curl and all that jazz.

    Stroud tends to provide explanations to the theory much closer to first principles, as much as a book for Engineering Mathematics can. It really excellent for walking you through the topics right from the basics and quickly ensuring you are confident with applying the concepts to more complex situations. Each chapter starts off spoon feeding you but by the end of the chapter, it is certainly rigorous - which is one of the reasons why it is universally popular.

    Bostock & Chandler is far less rigorous since it is targeted at A-Level students but it is no doubt more than adequate for picking up Further Mathematics.

    I managed to get both books from Amazon for £0.01 each + P&P when I was studying, so there is a good place to start if you are looking to get either of them.

    TLDR: Stroud is better than Bostock & Chandler but is probably a little too heavy for someone who hasn't been exposed to Further Mathematics and hasn't started their Engineering Mathematics course yet.
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    (Original post by pleasedtobeatyou)
    Bostock & Chandler certainly does not cover as much scope as Stroud but it should more or less be sufficient for first year Engineering Mathematics courses at university. Stroud should be good for up to second year since it covers div, grad, curl and all that jazz.

    Stroud tends to provide explanations to the theory much closer to first principles, as much as a book for Engineering Mathematics can. It really excellent for walking you through the topics right from the basics and quickly ensuring you are confident with applying the concepts to more complex situations. Each chapter starts off spoon feeding you but by the end of the chapter, it is certainly rigorous - which is one of the reasons why it is universally popular.

    Bostock & Chandler is far less rigorous since it is targeted at A-Level students but it is no doubt more than adequate for picking up Further Mathematics.

    I managed to get both books from Amazon for £0.01 each + P&P when I was studying, so there is a good place to start if you are looking to get either of them.

    TLDR: Stroud is better than Bostock & Chandler but is probably a little too heavy for someone who hasn't been exposed to Further Mathematics and hasn't started their Engineering Mathematics course yet.
    I see; a book specifically aimed at teaching A-level further maths would be better for this purpose than the Engineering Mathematics books by Stroud. I have the advanced one, but I'm not sure the level that the normal one is at. I think, given where the Advanced one starts off, the first one would be sufficient for the first couple of university maths courses, but what about A-level/equivalent students? I often hear the books recommended, and I just tend to pass on this recommendation...
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    (Original post by Smack)
    I see; a book specifically aimed at teaching A-level further maths would be better for this purpose than the Engineering Mathematics books by Stroud. I have the advanced one, but I'm not sure the level that the normal one is at. I think, given where the Advanced one starts off, the first one would be sufficient for the first couple of university maths courses, but what about A-level/equivalent students? I often hear the books recommended, and I just tend to pass on this recommendation...
    The "normal" Stroud is good but again probably overdoes it a little bit. Stroud was a mathematician and not an engineer.

    To be honest, free online resources (e.g. YouTube) are more than decent enough nowadays for anyone wanting to learn the A-Level syllabus.
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    (Original post by pleasedtobeatyou)
    To be honest, free online resources (e.g. YouTube) are more than decent enough nowadays for anyone wanting to learn the A-Level syllabus.
    Definitely. There are lots of fantastic resources available online nowadays for teaching engineering (and lots of other) content; well worth a look.
 
 
 
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