Calling all graduates-Your advice would be appreciated

Announcements Posted on
Four things that unis think matter more than league tables 08-12-2016
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    I'm going to be returning to university study next year for direct second year entry studying medicinal chemistry. Irrespective of subject, how did you get a 2:1 or a first? I would really appreciate all advice given as I don't want to finish my degree with a 2:2/ third classification because it will be a waste.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Work hard and stay organised and motivated. Good luck!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AngryRedhead)
    I'm going to be returning to university study next year for direct second year entry studying medicinal chemistry. Irrespective of subject, how did you get a 2:1 or a first? I would really appreciate all advice given as I don't want to finish my degree with a 2:2/ third classification because it will be a waste.
    Don't leave any gaps in your knowledge. If you don't understand anything, bug your lecturers and tutor until you've understood it. Find the top students and ask them if they can help you should you need their help.

    Quiz yourself endlessly. Revise all the week's material at the end of each week and make sure you've understood them and can answer any question related to them.

    Have a well defined study plan and organise everything else around it. You can do whatever you want after you've finished studying.

    Have small and achievable goals. Getting a 1st in your degree is the ultimate goal but I promise you it won't motivate you in the short-term. You need daily, weekly, monthly goals (hence what I said bout quizzing yourself weekly and monthly). E.g. Solve these exercises by 9 pm tomorrow. Or learn about this topic by 2 am tonight.

    Always take notes in lectures even if the lecture slides are available on VLE or online. You retain information more effectively when you take notes (Princeton study, look it up).

    Good luck.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Look for the quick wins and attention to detail which will give extra percentages:
    - When you read your conclusion, double-check that it actually answers the question and that you haven't rambled off at a tangent.
    - Spellcheck before submission.
    - If your assignment brief includes detail such as font, font size, line spacing etc., follow those instructions exactly and don't deviate from them.
    - Don't leave electronic submission until the last moment. You can't assume that IT systems will be available and/or working close to a deadline. Lots of people leave submission late and systems can become overloaded and slow.
    - Make work look neat (following any layout instructions). If it looks good when first opened, your marker will approach it in a positive frame of mind.

    More time-consuming is referencing. But when you learn to do it properly, it's a real percentage booster.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    You've got plenty of good advice already, I just want to add a few hints:
    - Before even starting an assignment, familiarise yourself with the marking criteria for it so you know what's expected.
    - In case you are permitted to chose your own titles for assignments or later the dissertation/research project, keep them feasible and take a topic that you find absolutely interesting, exciting and captivating. For my part, I was so fascinated by my dissertation topic that it never felt like "work" at all. That certainly helps going the extra mile, doing more reading, adding more little bits and bobs, and, in my case, paid off with a high distinction and a fully funded PhD.
    - Surely, there will be some point when the workload seems overwhelming. Don't be afraid to simply take a few hours or even an entire day off, relax, do something fun and don't despair.
    - With bigger assignments, plan to finish them a few days early, then leave them for a day or two and only then re-read them. With a bit of distance, you'll find it easier to spot mistakes.
    - If you have any questions or need additional reading, don't hesitate to ask your tutors. At least in my field, most postgraduate tutors teach subjects they are really passionate about and where they do their research in, not like in undergraduate courses, where all the staff has to teach a bit of the "boring basics" to freshers. Thus, staff will in most cases be really glad to have a student who is interested in their field, and try to help you with your questions.
    - Try to attend postgraduate and research conferences if you get the chance. This will give you an insight into current debates in your field and the kind of paper that is expected from you later.
 
 
 
Write a reply… Reply
Submit reply

Register

Thanks for posting! You just need to create an account in order to submit the post
  1. this can't be left blank
    that username has been taken, please choose another Forgotten your password?
  2. this can't be left blank
    this email is already registered. Forgotten your password?
  3. this can't be left blank

    6 characters or longer with both numbers and letters is safer

  4. this can't be left empty
    your full birthday is required
  1. Oops, you need to agree to our Ts&Cs to register
  2. Slide to join now Processing…

Updated: September 24, 2016
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Poll
Do you think you'll achieve your predicted A Level grades?
Useful resources

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Quick reply
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.