I need advice for an all in one purchase

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hello! I am writing in this forum with the hope that somebody will be able to give me some good advice on purchasing a new all in one pc. My budget is 300 gbp and i am looking for a pc with its motherboard to be able to take an i5 processor which i will salvage from my old computer. I have checked lenovo c20 and i did some research on its specifications and if im not mistaken it cannot take an i5. Ive been looking for days and have spent hours in looking for the right one. If anyone has some knowledge on this matter please give me some advice. I will be grateful
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AntonioMartel)
    Hello! I am writing in this forum with the hope that somebody will be able to give me some good advice on purchasing a new all in one pc. My budget is 300 gbp and i am looking for a pc with its motherboard to be able to take an i5 processor which i will salvage from my old computer. I have checked lenovo c20 and i did some research on its specifications and if im not mistaken it cannot take an i5. Ive been looking for days and have spent hours in looking for the right one. If anyone has some knowledge on this matter please give me some advice. I will be grateful
    Any idea what socket that i5 is? (or at least its model number?)
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    My suggestion is don't buy an all in one. They offer a very poor upgrade path (especially when you mention that you'll be installing an i5 yourself), not to mention if one component goes wrong you've lost your entire PC (monitor breaks, entire PC needs to go for repair for example). On top of that terribly poor for maintenance and just generally don't let you do much in the way of customization. Some models go so far as soldering things like the CPU or RAM to the board or use custom components, such as motherboards and GPU's so you can't upgrade.

    All in one machines are in general the worst purchase you could make and I'd never recommend them to anyone.

    And on top of that £300 is a ridiculously small amount for an all in one system which even if you could add an i5 would leave you with terribly mismatched specs. And the odds of adding the i5 in the first place are low.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    All in ones are mostly there to be used as is and save space. The vast majority aren't able to upgrade as they are laptops stuck in the back of a monitor. Laptops might be the way to go here. if you want something cheap look for a refurbished one.

    If you want to actively upgrade a computer you need a desktop.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by _gcx)
    Any idea what socket that i5 is? (or at least its model number?)
    Hi, it is an i5-4590T
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Acsel)
    My suggestion is don't buy an all in one. They offer a very poor upgrade path (especially when you mention that you'll be installing an i5 yourself), not to mention if one component goes wrong you've lost your entire PC (monitor breaks, entire PC needs to go for repair for example). On top of that terribly poor for maintenance and just generally don't let you do much in the way of customization. Some models go so far as soldering things like the CPU or RAM to the board or use custom components, such as motherboards and GPU's so you can't upgrade.

    All in one machines are in general the worst purchase you could make and I'd never recommend them to anyone.

    And on top of that £300 is a ridiculously small amount for an all in one system which even if you could add an i5 would leave you with terribly mismatched specs. And the odds of adding the i5 in the first place are low.
    oh wow you sure made me start rethinking. Well, i need an all in one because I am studying abroad and a pc of this style is easy to carry back home but also offers a big screen which is useful in order to work in a split screen environment. I dont intent using it for something heavy like gaming, it will be used for email, internet browsing and uni work. OK, you say 300 is not enough for a good all in one, what budget do you suggest, and what model?
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AntonioMartel)
    oh wow you sure made me start rethinking. Well, i need an all in one because I am studying abroad and a pc of this style is easy to carry back home but also offers a big screen which is useful in order to work in a split screen environment. I dont intent using it for something heavy like gaming, it will be used for email, internet browsing and uni work. OK, you say 300 is not enough for a good all in one, what budget do you suggest, and what model?
    Easy is fairly subjective here. I don't find transporting my very thin, very light 27 inch TV anywhere to be particularly easy to carry around. An all in one will be heavier, potentially larger and so on. I don't personally find that to be convenient.

    If you need convenience buy a laptop. Not only will it be far more portable than an all in one but you have far more choice (both in specs and cost) but the portability aspect is massively improved. On top of that you can actually use the laptop while traveling which is certainly not a feature of an all in one.

    If you find that a laptop isn't sufficient in terms of screen size buy a cheap monitor to use as an external display. You can either set it up to mirror your laptop screen or use it in a dual monitor setup, which is far better than simply split screening applications.

    In terms of cost a £300 laptop will outperform a £300 all in one (from my quick research) so you're also getting more bang for your buck. In terms of specs look for something with an i3 Processor and 8GB of RAM. Cost wise £300 is the minimum to buy something brand new and spending over £500 would be a waste unless you want something really nice, super lightweight and so on.

    Question though, you mention having an all in one is convenient for carrying back home, do you intend to be traveling a lot or is this just a once a year thing? If you'll be traveling often then a laptop will be your best bet but if you'll only be traveling back home very rarely then you could just buy a desktop. A desktop will offer the best performance to price ratio overall. How much traveling are you actually doing? Because an all in one is not convenient for lots of traveling.
 
 
 
Write a reply… Reply
Submit reply

Register

Thanks for posting! You just need to create an account in order to submit the post
  1. this can't be left blank
    that username has been taken, please choose another Forgotten your password?
  2. this can't be left blank
    this email is already registered. Forgotten your password?
  3. this can't be left blank

    6 characters or longer with both numbers and letters is safer

  4. this can't be left empty
    your full birthday is required
  1. Oops, you need to agree to our Ts&Cs to register
  2. Slide to join now Processing…

Updated: September 25, 2016
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Today on TSR
Poll
Have you ever bought a piece of work and submitted it as your own?
Useful resources

Articles:

The Student Room tech wikiTech forum guidelines

Quick link:

Unanswered technology and computers threads

Sponsored features:

Making money from your own website

Need some cash?

How to make money running your own website.

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Quick reply
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.