Do you think that the GCSE system is unfair?

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    My sister got her GCSE English result last year as a B, this year I recieved a C. I'm not trying to be mean or anyhing but I think I deserved it more.Firstly, I worked soo so much harder than her and was predicted an A, I aways did my homework and it was important for me to do well. My sister on the other hand didn't care how she did, never cared about her grades and ended up doing better than me, even though she was predicted an D.

    Do you think that the GCSE system is unfair? And do you have any other unfair gcse stories?
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    (Original post by M12S)
    My sister got her GCSE English result last year as a B, this year I recieved a C. I'm not trying to be mean or anyhing but I think I deserved it more.Firstly, I worked soo so much harder than her and was predicted an A, I aways did my homework and it was important for me to do well. My sister on the other hand didn't care how she did, never cared about her grades and ended up doing better than me, even though she was predicted an D.

    Do you think that the GCSE system is unfair? And do you have any other unfair gcse stories?
    Yes, the current system does seem unfair. Setting grade boundaries after all papers have been marked isn't really a true reflection of achievement. One person may be awarded a A one year while another may be awarded a B the next for achieving the same number of marks. Grade boundaries are high if the entire cohort did very well - they are low if they didn't. If you are unlucky enough to be born in a year of very bright individuals you will need to gain higher marks to achieve the grades. In my opinion it would be fairer to set the boundaries before the exam and those who achieve them get the corresponding grade, regardless of the number of people achieving those grades.
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    no. it just shows that she doesn't need to work hard to get good grades and her brain is naturally smart whereas you are not.
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    (Original post by Clemm101)
    Yes, the current system does seem unfair. Setting grade boundaries after all papers have been marked isn't really a true reflection of achievement. One person may be awarded a A one year while another may be awarded a B the next for achieving the same number of marks. Grade boundaries are high if the entire cohort did very well - they are low if they didn't. If you are unlucky enough to be born in a year of very bright individuals you will need to gain higher marks to achieve the grades. In my opinion it would be fairer to set the boundaries before the exam and those who achieve them get the corresponding grade, regardless of the number of people achieving those grades.
    So with your logic you think getting for example 50/100 on year is good enough to get an A*. But then the next year 50/100 is only good enough to get a C even though it was 100x times harder. (Obviously this is over-exaggerated and the boundaries from A*-C would never be this close, but you get the idea).
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    (Original post by M12S)
    My sister got her GCSE English result last year as a B, this year I recieved a C. I'm not trying to be mean or anyhing but I think I deserved it more.Firstly, I worked soo so much harder than her and was predicted an A, I aways did my homework and it was important for me to do well. My sister on the other hand didn't care how she did, never cared about her grades and ended up doing better than me, even though she was predicted an D.

    Do you think that the GCSE system is unfair? And do you have any other unfair gcse stories?
    Yes it is unfair. The make the grade boundaries higher as well which so unfair for all of us.
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    In one sense, yes, because some people are innately better at exams, memorising, reasoning, etc. than others. But that's just life. Blame life lol.
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    In my opinion the whole education system is messed up and needs to be reformed.
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    (Original post by Abusive)
    So with your logic you think getting for example 50/100 on year is good enough to get an A*. But then the next year 50/100 is only good enough to get a C even though it was 100x times harder. (Obviously this is over-exaggerated and the boundaries from A*-C would never be this close, but you get the idea).
    No, that's not what I'm saying. I'm saying that that the exam boards should set the grade boundaries before the exams so 50/100 = B. All those who achieve 50/100 should get a B. What happens currently that they take the top 2/5% and award them an A* then the next 5/7% and award them an A. That's how the boundaries are worked out (I know it isn't that simple but it's along those lines). If the papers are hard - and I'm fairly sure they know if an exam is likely to be a little tougher than the year before they should set the boundaries a little lower.

    Ordinarily, if you take a test you have to score a certain number of marks to pass. They don't increase the number of marks you need to pass just because five people already passed the test that day.
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    Um, no? The scaling works so that if you get a REALLY HARD exam one year, just by the examiners setting a really hard exam, then the grade boundaries are lowered so that you're not penalised just because of the year you sat the exam.
    The only unfair part imo is coursework - they take a sample and often people are moderated 2 grades down because of the sample work, even if they deserved a better grade.
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    They make the grade boundaries higher
    They add in unneccessary cource work for no reason, making us do more work, less time to revise
    Useless subjects like BTEC PE come in the way for some
    Some teachers are incompetant and lack teaching/grammar skills

    Of course it's not fair, it needs to be improved vastly.
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    Maybe your sister just used the time she did spend on English more productively.

    Personally, I never found the GCSE system unfair and most people I know didn't either
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    (Original post by Clemm101)
    Yes, the current system does seem unfair. Setting grade boundaries after all papers have been marked isn't really a true reflection of achievement. One person may be awarded a A one year while another may be awarded a B the next for achieving the same number of marks. Grade boundaries are high if the entire cohort did very well - they are low if they didn't. If you are unlucky enough to be born in a year of very bright individuals you will need to gain higher marks to achieve the grades. In my opinion it would be fairer to set the boundaries before the exam and those who achieve them get the corresponding grade, regardless of the number of people achieving those grades.
    They're set after as they're based on how well people did - a paper which is hard will have lower grade boundaries than an easier paper to make the proportions getting each grade relatively similar. That's the problem with setting it before, an exam board might appreciate the paper is more difficult than the year before but they have no idea to what extent until after marks are in.
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    There's not going to be massive variations in intelligence year by year, so the grade boundaries system is the most fair and the best for comparing students in different year groups that took different exams, of different difficulties. To some extent English requires a level of natural talent for the subject, so some may coast by on little work whereas others work hard and only get a C. That's life, I'm afraid.

    Don't sulk because grade boundaries didn't work in your favour.
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    (Original post by M12S)

    Do you think that the GCSE system is unfair? And do you have any other unfair gcse stories?
    Absolutely.
    I revised all my GCSE's the night before (with one exception) and landed 9A*'s. My friend however, who revised for an hour every night since the start of year 11, ended up with 2A's, and mostly B's and C's. Obviously these outcomes are completely unfair, and our results in no way show our work ethic or dedication.

    The problem with GCSE's is that they test 2 things; memory and natural ability.
    If you can remember the textbook back to front, you'll do well. If you come across a question you don't remember, but have good natural intellect, you can probably figure out the answer pretty easy. If you're not naturally able to do these two things, GCSE's will always be unfavourable to you.

    However, A-Level's are completely different. They are about application of knowledge, not just spewing facts. You'll find at A-Level it really is about hard work and studying
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    (Original post by M12S)
    My sister got her GCSE English result last year as a B, this year I recieved a C. I'm not trying to be mean or anyhing but I think I deserved it more.Firstly, I worked soo so much harder than her and was predicted an A, I aways did my homework and it was important for me to do well. My sister on the other hand didn't care how she did, never cared about her grades and ended up doing better than me, even though she was predicted an D.

    Do you think that the GCSE system is unfair? And do you have any other unfair gcse stories?
    Well, the gcse exams are meant to get harder each year, so maybe you just had a tougher exam than her. I think the gcse system is unfair because I did no revision and got 3A*s, 6As, 2Bs. Don't get me wrong, I was obviously happy- I was predicted A/A*s anyway but I did NOT deserve the grades I got. And some of my friends who worked very hard didn't get very good grades, but they deserved to do well!

    So how does the gcse system reflect a students true ability? It doesn't test everybody fairly.

    GCSE's just test a student's ability to memorise information and how good they are at doing exams! As you can see, my results in no way reflect hard work or dedication, which shows the system is 100% flawed.
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    (Original post by Harvey'sLaw)
    Absolutely.
    I revised all my GCSE's the night before (with one exception) and landed 9A*'s. My friend however, who revised for an hour every night since the start of year 11, ended up with 2A's, and mostly B's and C's. Obviously these outcomes are completely unfair, and our results in no way show our work ethic or dedication.

    The problem with GCSE's is that they test 2 things; memory and natural ability.
    If you can remember the textbook back to front, you'll do well. If you come across a question you don't remember, but have good natural intellect, you can probably figure out the answer pretty easy. If you're not naturally able to do these two things, GCSE's will always be unfavourable to you.

    However, A-Level's are completely different. They are about application of knowledge, not just spewing facts. You'll find at A-Level it really is about hard work and studying
    Did you do your gcse's this year? Because I have just started yr 12 and I am noticing the HUGE difference between gcse's and a levels- you actually need to understand the content thoroughly, and apply it properly. Unlike gcse's when you don't actually need to understand anything- you can get away with skimming through a textbook and flicking through a couple of past papers!
    Spoiler:
    Show
    Congrats on your gcse results!
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    (Original post by Rachel58)
    Um, no? The scaling works so that if you get a REALLY HARD exam one year, just by the examiners setting a really hard exam, then the grade boundaries are lowered so that you're not penalised just because of the year you sat the exam.
    The only unfair part imo is coursework - they take a sample and often people are moderated 2 grades down because of the sample work, even if they deserved a better grade.
    Yeah I have a friend who got an A* in geography coursework, but it got moderated down to a C, so she got a C overall!
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    ITT people angry at their grade and blaming it on the system

    (Original post by Clemm101)
    If you are unlucky enough to be born in a year of very bright individuals you will need to gain higher marks to achieve the grades
    You do realise that the chances of this are negligible? According to the 2011 census, there are between 500,000 and 700,000 people in each age cohort. With such a large sample size, variations in intelligence compared to another cohort will be minimal.

    The point of exams is to differentiate people according to ability. At GCSE, it is mainly about memorisation. Some people are better at this than others, end of story.
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    The reason they set grade boundaries after the exam is because it's almost impossible to predict how every candidate will sit the paper. Something they thought would be really hard end up being easy, or something they thought would be easy ends up being really hard. I also believe that grade boundaries are not set just by % of people getting certain marks, the grades meant to be qualitative and the boards are actually meant to use other metrics to tell whether it's the paper that's easier, although whether or not that really happens is up for debate.

    Exams will never be 100% fair, but their fairer than any other method.
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    (Original post by sunshine774)
    Well, the gcse exams are meant to get harder each year, so maybe you just had a tougher exam than her. I think the gcse system is unfair because I did no revision and got 3A*s, 6As, 2Bs. Don't get me wrong, I was obviously happy- I was predicted A/A*s anyway but I did NOT deserve the grades I got. And some of my friends who worked very hard didn't get very good grades, but they deserved to do well!

    So how does the gcse system reflect a students true ability? It doesn't test everybody fairly.

    GCSE's just test a student's ability to memorise information and how good they are at doing exams! As you can see, my results in no way reflect hard work or dedication, which shows the system is 100% flawed.
    The GCSEs are not meant to get harder even year.
 
 
 
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