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Can I talk about drugs if I go to see a counseller? Watch

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    Right basically, I'm kinda feeling a bit lost lately, my heads a bit all over the place, and its my first week at uni, so I kinda want to sort my head out so I can focus on studying.
    So I was thinking to go see a counseller in the uni?
    Also I'm into raving and stuff, so I tend to do a moderate amount of drugs, not so much as from being dependant, more just because thats the scene.
    I'm getting to the point now where I don't even really like doing drugs, I'm just bored, which is kind of my problem.
    Would I be able to talk about drugs to a uni counseller, or would I be incriminating myself or something?
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Right basically, I'm kinda feeling a bit lost lately, my heads a bit all over the place, and its my first week at uni, so I kinda want to sort my head out so I can focus on studying.
    So I was thinking to go see a counseller in the uni?
    Also I'm into raving and stuff, so I tend to do a moderate amount of drugs, not so much as from being dependant, more just because thats the scene.
    I'm getting to the point now where I don't even really like doing drugs, I'm just bored, which is kind of my problem.
    Would I be able to talk about drugs to a uni counseller, or would I be incriminating myself or something?
    Yes. There is a confidentiality agreement which they will keep to unless there is a serious risk. You can talk to them about anything, but just be aware of that. You can read the contract for yourself, but I doubt they will be that concerned about casual drug use.
    Btw, possibly silly but since you're not really keen on the drugs anyway have you tried hunting for any hobbie that might be able to replace it? Exercise could give you a bit of a rush so I guess it could be a good replacement.
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    Do speak to them, you may feel better. If you're unhappy with things in your life, they may be able to direct you towards changing it. I hope you find happiness and the support you need. A counsellor will, I believe, only report things if you or someone else is at risk. But it's worth looking at the confidentiality agreement they will give you to sign. There's always Talktofrank as well. You'll find this online.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Right basically, I'm kinda feeling a bit lost lately, my heads a bit all over the place, and its my first week at uni, so I kinda want to sort my head out so I can focus on studying.
    So I was thinking to go see a counseller in the uni?
    Also I'm into raving and stuff, so I tend to do a moderate amount of drugs, not so much as from being dependant, more just because thats the scene.
    I'm getting to the point now where I don't even really like doing drugs, I'm just bored, which is kind of my problem.
    Would I be able to talk about drugs to a uni counseller, or would I be incriminating myself or something?
    hiya, as someone who has worked with people with different addictions in the past I will say the following:
    1)Uni counsellors arent exactly for medical purposes, its more for moral support / talking to people.
    2) legally, counsellors arent allowed to disclose information per the Data Protection Act 1998 UNLESS you give them consent to iinform the uni / about issues which can be problematic in your future (potential misuse, adverse education habits, affecting other students etc). depending on how bad it is, reconsider seeing them
    3) almost all people I know with substance problems have been kicked out of uni dropped out, so it is important to seek the right help
    4) speak to your GP as theyll be able to help as the can send you to proper therapy / get someone to prescribe the correct medication to help with the problem and everything is confidential (providing your not contemplating suicide or comitting crimes)
    5) mind is a mental health charity (addiction is a mental condition) and you can just chat to them on the phone, again, like the GP surgery they have similar data protection
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    Data protection act and confidentiality relating to safeguarding and counselling are separate things.

    The Data protection relates to how personal data is stored and who sees it. So the records all counsellors and doctors keep of your sessions need to be safely stored away either in locked cabinets or password protected computer with reasonable protection from malware and viruses. Not stored on USBs or laid around where random people might see your name and address and know you've been to counselling. Also that your data is only used for intended purposes (which each business has to declare to the data protection commission). If I collect your name address age and height for a research thing related to counselling, that information can only be used for my research. I can't sell it to third party or use it for other purposes without additional consent.

    Data protection act also allows you to see any information held about you including medical and therapeutic files. Providing that it's not deemed to negatively impact you should you see it. Courts can see all records if deemed relevant to a case.

    Confidentiality means that what you say stays with a counsellor unless you are in danger or someone else is at risk of harm. the majority of this stuff is not clear cut. If you self harm, it doesn't mean that your counsellor has to break confidentiality to let parents, school or uni know. If you're suicidal they won't automatically tell police or emergency services. So most stuff is case by case and where possible with client consent. Even a clearer case of abuse, usually meets with the counsellor helping the client disclose as a preference. Rather than calling police without their consent. But a therapist would call if necessary.

    Except money laundering and terrorism which gets reported whether you want it to be or not.

    Im a counsellor and if I were seeing a similar client I might want to explore their choices..if they plan to take drugs.

    And that might be useful for you if you don't feel like you want to take them anyway.
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    Also worth bearing in mind that a uni counsellor might be well placed to refer you to a specialist service, if you need it. The majority of uni counsellors have broad training and multiple placements; meaning that they build up a good knowledge of good and bad services for different issues. Sometimes a better knowledge than psychologists and mental health staff in NHS about certain services and their real time effectiveness. (Not least because volunteering in these services means they can be privy to how they are run in ways that others can't appreciate)x It also means that they may be well trained in drug counselling or some other specialism due to their other experience.
 
 
 
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