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Is it ok to move 2 an England school in the middle GCSE course: i.e Yr 11? watch

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    Hi There everyone- I have a huge problem on my hands. Can anyone help?

    I dont know the UK system of education so well- and this is an unusual situation. Hope some good soul helps me iwth afdvice. I wd really value it.


    I am from Ireland. and I have been unable 2 gather info frm other sources and there is no real support system 4 students like me with unusual circumstances.

    I will be 15 in November- so I'm still 14- but have finished my Junior Cert Exams in Ireland- which are equivalent 2 the GCSes in UK. Now, in ireland there r only 12 years of schooling as opposed 2 the 13 in the UK. The Jr Cert exams, which are considered equal 2 the GCSEs in Uk, are taken at the end of the 9th yr- followed by what is called a gap/transition yr- and then 2 years of Leaving Cert/A-level equivalent.
    So, for all purposes I have done my GCSes already. We r now moving 2 wARWICKSHIRE, eNGLAND- AND THERE HAS BEEN A BIG PROBLEM RE: my year of Entry. I'm too young for Sixth form, and I should, really speaking, acc 2 my age , be going 2 Yr 11. But schools r reluctant as this will be the middle of the GCSE course, as I will be doing only 11th- the second yr of GCSe- and completely missing out on the yr 10/1st yr of GCSe. Schools wd prefer that I go 2 yr 10, and do GCSes all over again- which I think will be an unnecessary strain on myself- 2 have 2 go undergo 2 yrs of training for an exam I have already done. But taking into consideration the fact that I am too young for Sixth form, I'm willing 2 attend yr 11 if the school agrees. Now, only one school has agreed 2 take me in yr 11.

    Now, my problem is: which the school couldnt satisfy me with their answers--

    Is it possible 2 do reasonably well in GCSE exams- having missed on one full year?

    How much weightage/impact do GCSe results have on uni admissions? Cos I will probably not do so well in GCSEs as I am really capable of -due 2 missing out of 1 yr?

    In case he I dont do so well in GCSes in this case, will universities consider my Junior Cert results from Ireland instead of the GCSes?

    There will be no problem for schools 2 take me 2 sixth form next year- but-After all- there is just the question of my doing something this yr - I cant just be home doing nothing.

    SO i have 2 choose between staying back in Ireland and seek admission 2 sixth form next year- which is not very practical-
    or
    To enter yr 11 and appear for GCSes at the end of the coming academic year.
    or
    the rare possbility of admitting myself 2 Sixth form straight as i've already done my GCSes(one school has agreed 2 do that if I do well in Jr Cert exams)
    or
    Go back 2 yrs-i n yr 10- schools r soooo willing 2 do that so that I can do the full GCSE course- but we in the family r reluctant for obvious reasons.

    I am at my wits' end. I have made hundreds of phone calls and approached the county councils ands schools-- but I've had no satisfactory explanation/advice/response.
    I can only hope u can give me some advice. I'm quite a good student- not extremely intelligent- but I predict at least 4/5 As in my Jr Cert/ GCses.

    Elles- if u r reading- or whoever is willing 2 help- Please do reply. I know its a big headcahe - for someone else who does not know me 2 think for me -first by trying 2 grasp the exact situation- but I'm sure bcos u allr so familiar 2 the system there- u will be able 2 advice. I shall be ver so gr8ful 2 u. I wd value ur opinion.
    Thanks and regards
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    If you are going to be 15 in November I would of thought you were suppose to be in yr10 this September because i was 16 during my yr11 year. If that is true then you can go into yr10 right? You would still be with people of the same age....
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    (Original post by littlebee2)
    If you are going to be 15 in November I would of thought you were suppose to be in yr10 this September because i was 16 during my yr11 year. If that is true then you can go into yr10 right? You would still be with people of the same age....

    yep they are right but even if you did start in year 11, i had a similar situation, i had a year out of school so i missed year 10 but the new school wanted to put me into year 10 but i didnt want to go so they let me go into year 11 and i still managed to do well and get 2 b's and 6 C's. You have to speak to the school about it more than anything else, they know what your capable of. Also, if you prove you are smart enough, some schools let you go into sixth form when you arent old enough.
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    (Original post by littlebee2)
    If you are going to be 15 in November I would of thought you were suppose to be in yr10 this September because i was 16 during my yr11 year. If that is true then you can go into yr10 right? You would still be with people of the same age....

    BUT U C- LITTLE BEE- I HAVE ALREADY SAT THE JUNIOR CERT EXAMS IN IRELAND WHICH R EQUIVALENT 2 gcvsES- SO WHY SHOULD I EVEN THINK OF GOING 2 YEARS BACK 2 SIT THE SAME-LEVEL EXAM - AGAIN? bUT I'M TOO YOUNG 4 SIXTH FORM AS WELL- SO MY MOM THINKS GOING 2 YR 11 IS A BETTER OPTION- AND I AM BEGINNING 2 THUINK SO MYSELF BUT AM STILL NOT SURE.
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    (Original post by Tailz)
    yep they are right but even if you did start in year 11, i had a similar situation, i had a year out of school so i missed year 10 but the new school wanted to put me into year 10 but i didnt want to go so they let me go into year 11 and i still managed to do well and get 2 b's and 6 C's. You have to speak to the school about it more than anything else, they know what your capable of. Also, if you prove you are smart enough, some schools let you go into sixth form when you arent old enough.

    HI TAILZ- TELL ME MORE ABT HOW U COPED WITH YR 11 AFTER MISSING OUT COMPLETELY ON YR 10? MUST HAVE BEEN VERY STRESSFUL- AND DID U FEEL REALLY OUT OF PLACE AND LAGGING BEHIND OTHERS- WHILE ALL THE WHILE TRYING 2 CATCH UP WITH THE STUDIES LOST? WERE THE TEACHERS COOPERATIVE? DO U THINK U COULD HAVE DONE BETTER IF U HAD DONE 2 YRS IN gcsES? dO U THINK ATTENDING JUST ONE YR AFFECTS GCSE PERFORMANCE AND HENCE UNI ADMISSION? I DO ADMIRE THE FACT THAT U STILL FOUND A WAY OUT AND R DOING OK. THANX.
    AS 2 GOING 2 SIXTH FORM- I THINK I'M PROBABLY TOO YOUNG YET- NOT FRM ACADEMIC POINT OF VIEW BUT I I WILL PROBABLY NOT BE COMFY WITH KIDS 2 -2 AND HALF YRS SENIOR 2 ME. JUST A SOCIAL ISSUE. ALSO, I MIGHT BE HELD BACK AT UNI FOR NOT BEING 17. SO WHY TAKE THE RISK? BETTER 2 B WITH KIDS UR AGE THAN GOING WITH OLDER KIDS AND THEN HAVING TO COMPULSORILY TAKE GAP YR BCOS THEY WONT LET U IN UNI?
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    There's a lot involved in regards to choosing the boards for your chosen subjects, completing the entire syllabus in two years (including coursework specification which may be hard to squeeze in amongst revision and practice past papers - unless you do IGCSES of course).

    You're still 14.
    Since your birthday is in November, it makes sense for you to start in Year 10 and start your GCSES properly with enough time and preparation. If you were 15 already, going onto 16, then yeah, it might be best for you to start straight in Year 11 but Year 10 students are 14-15 whereas Year 11 students are aged 15-16, majority being 16.

    It is evident that the Irish and English education system is a conflict for you but I do advise that it'd be best to do both years and start in Year 10 if you have to because the stress throughout the second year is really tough and will be a whole lot stressful if you think you'll be able to complete between 9-11 coursework specifications, up to 12 possible modular exams, learn new methods and techniques for questions and the taught syllabus in general - oh and then there's revision and past papers to do. I don't want to put you off but this is based on my experience over the past two years. It was very stressful at times, especially when it came to staying up for about 3 nights in a row each month when the coursework load became unbearable.

    You must note that two years worth of experience and preparation will allow you to reach your full potential than just cramming it all in one year. Universities (some of them anyways) do take a look at GCSE results to differentiate the applicants that have been consistantly hard working and those who flunked their GCSEs but have progressed during their A-Levels. It's a very important choice you have to make and I hope I've given you some insight in regards to your queries.

    Good luck.
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    i would strongly advise that you start from year 10. i really doubt you can squeeze the whole sylabus into one year and come out with decent grades at the end of it.
    i have a mate that was in another school for year 10 so was doing the igcse sylabus, she was predicted all A's. she then came to my school where gcse's are studied and had a lot of coursework to catch up on, she's found it very difficult this year and is unlikely to get the kind of grades she was predicted at her old school at igcse.
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    Well, starting in yr 11 would be quite problematic, if you just go straight in, half way through the course. However, if you did the whole course in just one year in half the subjects-perhaps ones you didn't study in Ireland-that would be a better option, but I don't know anywhere that would do that. There's also the issue of coursework, as Hodan said. And if you start in yr 11, when the class was in yr 10, they might have covered bits of the syllabus that might not have been on the Irish equivalent. So going straight into yr 11 would be a bit odd really, if you haven't done the first year.

    Starting in year 10 would be a better idea, although you've already done GCSE equivalents. But the English syllabuses might be quite different to the Irish ones, so there might not be that much overlap. And if there is, you'll just have an advantage! And you're the age at which most people go into yr 10 anyway, so you'll be with people exactly your age. And also you could choose subjects that you didn't do in Ireland, if you wanted, to make it more interesting for you.

    Starting in yr 12 would feel odd, I'd think. You'd be with people mostly 2 years older than yourself, so you'd feel quite young I'd think. And the A-Level course might build from stuff in the GCSE that wasn't in the Irish certificate, so there would be some completely new stuff that you're expected to already know. Then there'd be the issue, when the time comes, of going to university. I don't know if there's a minimum age you can go, but if you go into yr 12 now, you'll only be 16 when you start uni (unless you take a gap year), and hence you won't be able to do certain things that other students would be able to do for at least a year. However it'd mean that you finish education 2 years early and hence be at a degree level early so get a career early and stuff.
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    OP: you hurt my eyes

    you've finished something that is equivalent to the GCSEs that UK students do at the age of 14. if i were you i'd go straight to college as it would be unnecessary to do GCSEs all over again. you don't have to go to a sixth form, where they obviously want you aged 16-19. there are colleges around that still do alevels.

    if you didn't do very well in your junior certificate exams, then starting GCSEs all over again in year 10 would probably be best. there's also another option: home schooling. open university has a whole range of courses.
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    I know that these are the mandatory subjects:
    Irish† (Higher, Ordinary and Foundation), English (Higher, Ordinary and Foundation), Mathematics (Higher, Ordinary and Foundation),A modern European language; French, Spanish, German or Italian (Higher and Ordinary),
    Civic, Social and Political Education (Common) and Social, Personal and Health Education (not examined).

    Shubhoo, I was woundering what other courses you took? When do you recieve your grades or do you already have them ?
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    To the OP,

    Just some advice- firstly don't type in all capital letters as it is hard to read.
    Secondly, I know this girl who came to my school from Ireland in year 11 with a similar situation to you. She got all As in her Irish Leaving Certificates and tried to do GCSEs in one year- she ended up getting Ds and Es in her mocks after lots of revision and only sat Foundation Level papers in English, Bio, Chem, Physics whilst the majority of other students sat Higher. For your information, the highest you can get at Foundation level is grade C-- not A/A*.

    Therefore, I would say if you are confident to do all coursework and exam prep in one year then go for it, but personally I would rather do the course over 2 years so that you would achieve your maximum potential- afterall many As and A* would look better than Cs and Ds IF you are capable of getting high grades, which judging from your posts you are.

    Hope this helps, if you have any more questions drop me a PM!
    Princess
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    if i was you i would go straight to college, and do a levels!
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    (Original post by usa1981)
    I know that these are the mandatory subjects:
    Irish† (Higher, Ordinary and Foundation), English (Higher, Ordinary and Foundation), Mathematics (Higher, Ordinary and Foundation),A modern European language; French, Spanish, German or Italian (Higher and Ordinary),
    Civic, Social and Political Education (Common) and Social, Personal and Health Education (not examined).

    Shubhoo, I was woundering what other courses you took? When do you recieve your grades or do you already have them ?


    Hi USA -- I did 10 courses- all at a Higher level. The courses I did were: English / French/Irish/ Science (as a single subject,new syllabus)/ Maths/Business studies/History/Geography/Technical Graphics and CSPE- which of course, as u say is not examined-- so 9 courses in total.
    The results are not due until 12 th September-- which makes it hard 2 wait to start school , cos school starts in england on 5th, and i have 2 decide quick, so that my parents and I can move !! Very tight situation. Thanx.
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    (Original post by *Princess*)
    To the OP,

    Just some advice- firstly don't type in all capital letters as it is hard to read.

    Therefore, I would say if you are confident to do all coursework and exam prep in one year then go for it, but personally I would rather do the course over 2 years so that you would achieve your maximum potential- afterall many As and A* would look better than Cs and Ds IF you are capable of getting high grades, which judging from your posts you are.

    Hope this helps, if you have any more questions drop me a PM!
    Princess
    Hi Princess-Sorry 'bout the capitals!! But like everything in this world- there was a reason !! anyway- thanx 4 ur advice.
    Well u have a point re: doing good in GCSEs than not doing so good-- but then, dont I have the option 2 put forward my Irish Junior Cert results forward
    when it comes to revealing them 2 Uni? I can fall back on either Irish Jr Cert or GCSEs, whichever are better---cant I ? Its just a question of filling up my time in the coming academic year after all --- I cant change my Irish results- whatever they r gonna be-- and doing GCSEs, albeit just 1 yr can be looked upon as a chance 2 better urself -- or just whiling away time in a useful manner? or mayb someone can suggest useful courses/time fillers that wont make me 4get my past studies and hence make it difficult for A-levels?. Thanx.
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    (Original post by Chezua)
    OP: you hurt my eyes

    you've finished something that is equivalent to the GCSEs that UK students do at the age of 14. if i were you i'd go straight to college as it would be unnecessary to do GCSEs all over again. you don't have to go to a sixth form, where they obviously want you aged 16-19. there are colleges around that still do alevels.

    if you didn't do very well in your junior certificate exams, then starting GCSEs all over again in year 10 would probably be best. there's also another option: home schooling. open university has a whole range of courses.
    Hi Chezua--

    No more assault on your eyes !! Sorry.
    Is there a difference between Sixth Form and A-levels ? I wasnt aware of that !!! Please enlighten me further.
    Also, I cant wait until Irish Junior Cert results 2 decide- cos results will only be out on 12th september- and schools in England start Sept 3/4/5 !! That wd be missing valuable time if i were 2 go 2 yr 11-- and also we have 2 move countries in the intervening time !! Help !!
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    6 days isn't really 'valuable time' when you take into consideration you've already missed years. If I were you I'd wait for my results and then decide, ask the sixth form and the schools willing to take you if it's possible to go in a week or so later.
    To be quite honest, if I were you I would want to do my GCSE's unless my Junior Cert results were really brilliant. A-levels will probably be a much bigger struggle for you as you will have covered some different material and you'll find it much more difficult socially as well. At the moment it's only 16/17 year olds but who can't yet go to clubs etc. But when your in the second year a lot of your peers will be 18 and you will be left out of a lot of the fun. The people around you will be more mature and might be judgmental because of your age. It would be a lot more fun in my opinion to be around people my own age.
    Universities are also often unwilling to take students younger than 17. A friend of mine had this problem, she was 16 going on 17 and was asked to take a year out. This time would be better spent now, getting extra qualifications than later when you really want to be getting on with your life. A gap year at 16 is hard because many options are only available to 18 year olds.
    Seeing as you've already done the Junior Cert why not just do the GCSE's and then use whichever results are better? It's a chance lots of kids would jump at. You'll have had the experience of formal exams already and will have covered some similar contents. You've got a great advantage, why not use it?
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    (Original post by shubhoo)
    Hi Chezua--

    No more assault on your eyes !! Sorry.
    Is there a difference between Sixth Form and A-levels ? I wasnt aware of that !!! Please enlighten me further.
    Also, I cant wait until Irish Junior Cert results 2 decide- cos results will only be out on 12th september- and schools in England start Sept 3/4/5 !! That wd be missing valuable time if i were 2 go 2 yr 11-- and also we have 2 move countries in the intervening time !! Help !!
    A-levels are the exams taken and the qualifications; sixth form refers to the establishment you take them in. There's a big difference between college (which generally expects you to be independent, sometimes employs a "turn up to your lessons or don't, it's your life" policy, takes people of more or less any age), school (where years 12 and 13 are essentially a continuation of the rest of your school life, it's all very sheltered from the 'real world', same teachers, similar rules albeit more relaxed, less independence needed, better work ethic, but they generally only take people of the right age) and sixth form (which, in my understanding, is kind of a cross between the two; but meanings of this term differ, it can also simply mean "years 12 and 13" in a school, which is generally how I use the term). These establishments will vary by region and individually though, so don't feel compelled not to consider any colleges / schools, but do be aware of the differences in style.

    I still say that no 14-year-old should jump straight into sixth form, but then I don't know what it's like at a college.

    Sorry about the huge sentence. Hope that clears it up though.
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    ^ freakin' hell that reminds me that pm i saved up in pc ages ago #zomg#

    if i was that 14-year old, i won't like to mix with people a lot older than me but then again, (erm, i'm confused, in your other thread it was your 'son') you can't very well do GCSEs again.

    um hangon, i thought when you say 'school' that basically means 'sixth form' my understanding is you have a sixth form college and a sixth form school where college you get more 'freedom' and voc. subjects and the latter the opposite. no?
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    (Original post by Chezua)
    (erm, i'm confused, in your other thread it was your 'son')
    Three guesses why I failed to make any references to "you" in the above post.

    (Original post by Chezua)
    um hangon, i thought when you say 'school' that basically means 'sixth form' my understanding is you have a sixth form college and a sixth form school where college you get more 'freedom' and voc. subjects and the latter the opposite. no?
    Yes and no. As I said, meanings vary by region. Maybe someone in Warwickshire can sort this out. :p: My... educational establishment :p:... wasn't a college or a sixth form school, it was my school that I'd gone to for the last 9 years, and I spent another 2 years there. It was more or less the same as it had always been. A bit more relaxed, smaller class sizes, some different classrooms, different common rooms, but that had happened every single year. When someone refers to "a sixth form" I generally think of years 12 and 13, but I know there are specialist schools out there that are basically normal schools, except that they contain only years 12 and 13, and they're called "sixth forms" too.

    Meh. Not worth losing sleep over... checking out the establishment itself rather than the proper term to refer to it by is more the way to go.
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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    Yes and no. As I said, meanings vary by region. Maybe someone in Warwickshire can sort this out. :p: My... educational establishment :p:... wasn't a college or a sixth form school, it was my school that I'd gone to for the last 9 years, and I spent another 2 years there. It was more or less the same as it had always been. A bit more relaxed, smaller class sizes, some different classrooms, different common rooms, but that had happened every single year. When someone refers to "a sixth form" I generally think of years 12 and 13, but I know there are specialist schools out there that are basically normal schools, except that they contain only years 12 and 13, and they're called "sixth forms" too.

    Meh. Not worth losing sleep over... checking out the establishment itself rather than the proper term to refer to it by is more the way to go.
    i wonder which 'school' you went to :ninja: bloody hell, 9 years. you mean it's a primary + sec + sixth form school? le blimey...

    the one in bold, that's more or less like a sixth form school. i went to a king edward open day and basically they have both secondary and sixth form years in there as well, and KE's sixth form's classified as 'school'.
 
 
 

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