Doing biomedical science then medicine postgraduate

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    I am currently just started A levels; doing biology, chemistry and psychology.

    Do you think doing biomedical science then doing medicine postgraduate is a good way?
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    Why not work hard and apply straight to medicine? Post grad will also be competitive
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    I would recommend doing the best you can and trying to get into medicine as a school leaver. I'm doing GEM and it's longer, financially worse and more competitive as there are a lot fewer places than there are on 5 year courses.
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    (Original post by Going_To_California)
    I would recommend doing the best you can and trying to get into medicine as a school leaver. I'm doing GEM and it's longer, financially worse and more competitive as there are a lot fewer places than there are on 5 year courses.
    I've heard biomedical students progressing onto medicine have more knowledge in the subject and a better advantage over students.

    Getting AAA at A levels is a very low chance for me; let alone I got 5 A's and 5 B's at GCSE's.
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    (Original post by studentshavefun)
    I've heard biomedical students progressing onto medicine have more knowledge in the subject and a better advantage over students.

    Getting AAA at A levels is a very low chance for me; let alone I got 5 A's and 5 B's at GCSE's.
    You say you've only just started your A-Levels, so it's too early to tell how you'll do overall. I know people with average GCSEs who then performed really well at A-Level.

    My GEM course accepts grads from all disciplines, and I've definitely found it less overwhelming than students from non life-sciences backgrounds, but the gap starts to narrow as you go through the course.

    It's good to have a back-up plan, but try to avoid GEM as much as possible.
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    (Original post by Going_To_California)
    You say you've only just started your A-Levels, so it's too early to tell how you'll do overall. I know people with average GCSEs who then performed really well at A-Level.

    My GEM course accepts grads from all disciplines, and I've definitely found it less overwhelming than students from non life-sciences backgrounds, but the gap starts to narrow as you go through the course.

    It's good to have a back-up plan, but try to avoid GEM as much as possible.
    Ah okay, I understand. Also, Can you do Pharmacy postgraduate or is is just Medicine and Dentistry?
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    (Original post by studentshavefun)
    I've heard biomedical students progressing onto medicine have more knowledge in the subject and a better advantage over students.

    Getting AAA at A levels is a very low chance for me; let alone I got 5 A's and 5 B's at GCSE's.
    Why don't you apply for foundation courses for medicine. King's, Glasgow, Southampton and Nottingham are some that offer it. The entry requirements are way lower.

    You could do Biomedical Science and work really hard for 3 years but GEM is way more competitive.
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    Studying biomedical sciences doesn't make you eligible to study postgraduate medicine, sorry.
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    (Original post by Etomidate)
    Studying biomedical sciences doesn't make you eligible to study postgraduate medicine, sorry.
    Hey, what does make you eligible to study post graduate medicine?
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    (Original post by Shazen)
    Hey, what does make you eligible to study post graduate medicine?
    Having a medical degree.
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    (Original post by Etomidate)
    Having a medical degree.
    I meant as in there are other alternate degrees that you can do which gives you access to do a normal medicine degree.
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    You mean graduate entry medicine, postgraduate medicine is something you do AFTER getting a degree within medicine.
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    (Original post by studentshavefun)
    Ah okay, I understand. Also, Can you do Pharmacy postgraduate or is is just Medicine and Dentistry?
    You can do as many undergraduate degrees as you like, as long as you can pay for it.
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    (Original post by gemmac123455)
    Why don't you apply for foundation courses for medicine. King's, Glasgow, Southampton and Nottingham are some that offer it. The entry requirements are way lower.

    You could do Biomedical Science and work really hard for 3 years but GEM is way more competitive.
    Foundation courses are only for people who are disadvantaged (come from a poor background) but it does look like an easier route into medicine.
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    (Original post by Etomidate)
    Studying biomedical sciences doesn't make you eligible to study postgraduate medicine, sorry.
    It says you need a 2:1 science degree to study postgraduate medicine?
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    (Original post by ArabianPhoenix)
    You mean graduate entry medicine, postgraduate medicine is something you do AFTER getting a degree within medicine.
    I thought postgraduate course is after getting your undergraduate degree?
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    (Original post by studentshavefun)
    I thought postgraduate course is after getting your undergraduate degree?
    You are thinking of graduate entry medicine. Postgraduate medicine is what you study after you have a medical degree
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    (Original post by studentshavefun)
    I thought postgraduate course is after getting your undergraduate degree?
    You are right. But "postgraduate medicine" may refer to additional training in medicine after graduating with a basic medical degree. Graduate Entry Medicine, on the other hand, refers to applying for the basic medical degree post-undergrad (in any other subject). It's just semantics really.
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    I did that & I'm in a 5 year undergrad program.

    The only downside is the cost and you will be amongst the older students in your year. But you'll have more experience than just starting out as a fresh faced 18 year old. For my best friend it will be her 3rd degree after a masters. My also cousin got into a 4 year GEP in Ireland. Do what works best for you.
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    (Original post by Lemons1990)
    I did that & I'm in a 5 year undergrad program.

    The only downside is the cost and you will be amongst the older students in your year. But you'll have more experience than just starting out as a fresh faced 18 year old. For my best friend it will be her 3rd degree after a masters. My also cousin got into a 4 year GEP in Ireland. Do what works best for you.
    The cost will be fine for me, personally (as I currently go to a private school etc), and I am also one of the youngest in my year so it would work out well in age wise. I just worry what will happen, say once I get a biomedical science degree but do not get into graduate entry medicine. So it is quite risky but the sound of graduate entry medicine does sound to be better especially with gaining more knowledge.
 
 
 
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