Explain how the oxidation of glucose results in the formation of ATP?

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    What kind of keywords would I have to use?
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    This occurs in Glycolysis, the first step of aerobic respiration.
    1. Glucose is phosphorylated by 2ATP molecules.
    2. Glucose is now Hexose Phosphate
    3. 4ATP are produced by substrate-level phosphorylation from 4ADP

    those are the main bits
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    (Original post by valbrechts)
    This occurs in Glycolysis, the first step of aerobic respiration.
    1. Glucose is phosphorylated by 2ATP molecules.
    2. Glucose is now Hexose Phosphate
    3. 4ATP are produced by substrate-level phosphorylation from 4ADP

    those are the main bits
    Thank you
    But what is a substrate-level phosphorylation? Is it glycerine 3 phosphate
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    (Original post by Hazel99)
    Thank you
    But what is a substrate-level phosphorylation? Is it glycerine 3 phosphate
    Oh its too hard to explain. This question is for A2 right? If you're AS then this is all too much detail so you should ignore my reply
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    Yeah this is A2, would the hexose sugar be "phoshorylated 6C sugar" and I know "GP" and "pyruvate" would these come into the answer ?
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    (Original post by Hazel99)
    Yeah this is A2, would the hexose sugar be "phoshorylated 6C sugar" and I know "GP" and "pyruvate" would these come into the answer ?
    Dont think pyruvate would be relevant to the question since it only asks about ATP. How many marks would this be?

    Basically:

    Glucose (6C) is phophorylated
    > converted into Hexose Phosphate (6C)
    > Hexose Phosphate splits into x2 Triose Phosphates (3C)
    >Triose Phophate converted to Pyruvate whilst 2NAD is reduced (to form NADH2), and 4ADP is converted to 4ATP via 'substrate level phosphorylation (ATP is formed directly from phosphate compounds)

    Thats basically the whole process of glycolysis. Thats all I can help with othewise!
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    (Original post by valbrechts)
    Dont think pyruvate would be relevant to the question since it only asks about ATP. How many marks would this be?

    Basically:

    Glucose (6C) is phophorylated
    > converted into Hexose Phosphate (6C)
    > Hexose Phosphate splits into x2 Triose Phosphates (3C)
    >Triose Phophate converted to Pyruvate whilst 2NAD is reduced (to form NADH2), and 4ADP is converted to 4ATP via 'substrate level phosphorylation (ATP is formed directly from phosphate compounds)

    Thats basically the whole process of glycolysis. Thats all I can help with othewise!
    Thank you for going step by step, I get it now 👌🏻😊
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    You might find this link helpful for the entire process: http://www.s-cool.co.uk/a-level/biology/respiration

    Good luck!
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    Wait i've been told this differently.

    1. glucose is goes through 2 phosphorylation reactions using 2 ATP this forms a more reactive fructose 1,6 bisphosphate and 2 ADP molecules
    2. fructose 1,6 bisphosphate splits into 2 triose phosphate
    3. the 2 triose phosphate then converted into 2 pyruvate molecules through oxidation. using 2 NAD,and producing 2 NADH. Additionally 4 ADP and 4 Pi are turned into 4 ATP during this stage.
    4. resulting in a net gain of 2 ATP molecules.

    i've been told its fructose 1,6 bisphosphate not hexose phosphate.
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    (Original post by KappaRoss)
    Wait i've been told this differently.

    1. glucose is goes through 2 phosphorylation reactions using 2 ATP this forms a more reactive fructose 1,6 bisphosphate and 2 ADP molecules
    2. fructose 1,6 bisphosphate splits into 2 triose phosphate
    3. the 2 triose phosphate then converted into 2 pyruvate molecules through oxidation. using 2 NAD,and producing 2 NADH. Additionally 4 ADP and 4 Pi are turned into 4 ATP during this stage.
    4. resulting in a net gain of 2 ATP molecules.

    i've been told its fructose 1,6 bisphosphate not hexose phosphate.
    You do realise fructose is a hexose sugar, right?
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    (Original post by valbrechts)
    This occurs in Glycolysis, the first step of aerobic respiration.
    1. Glucose is phosphorylated by 2ATP molecules.
    2. Glucose is now Hexose Phosphate
    3. 4ATP are produced by substrate-level phosphorylation from 4ADP

    those are the main bits
    Glucose is now glucose DIPHOSPHATE, because 2 ATP molecules have been used.
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    Yes I do you clapped tard. I'm asking for guidance on the correct terminology. And its not DIPHOSHATE its bisphosphate.

    Pic from page 138 ocr a2 pearson book.

    Fructose is not hexose. Fructose is an example of an hexose sugar. All it means is a 6 carbon sugar of which there are many more such as glucose itself and if you'd like it even has two forms alpha and beta.
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    (Original post by Nikita Verma)
    You might find this link helpful for the entire process: http://www.s-cool.co.uk/a-level/biology/respiration

    Good luck!

    PLEASE READ THE LINK, it will clear all doubts.
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    (Original post by KappaRoss)
    Posted from TSR Mobile

    Yes I do you clapped tard. I'm asking for guidance on the correct terminology. And its not DIPHOSHATE its bisphosphate.

    Pic from page 138 ocr a2 pearson book.

    Fructose is not hexose. Fructose is an example of an hexose sugar. All it means is a 6 carbon sugar of which there are many more such as glucose itself and if you'd like it even has two forms alpha and beta.
    If you've done Chemistry A Level, you'd know di is a lot more frequently used than bi. "Fructose is not a hexose sugar, it's an example of one". Are you thick? You've just said it's a hexose sugar right there, lol.
    It's amazing how you put so much belief into the terminology of an OCR textbook when it's not even representative of the real chemistry nomenclature.

    Fructose IS a hexose sugar, because it's an isomer of glucose, so it must have the same number of carbon atoms (6).
 
 
 
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