Are there any Computing/Computer Science undergraduate degrees which teach C/C++?

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    I've been coding in C/C++ for almost 5 years now. I would like to take a degree where I can be taught either of those languages. The courses I have looked into, have only specified C# or Java, which I'd rather not like to learn.
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    You generally learn multiple languages. And if you want a job to do with programming, you probably will need multiple languages. If you really want to work with C/C++ all I can suggest is looking at specific modules at each university and see if they teach that specific language. Just know that you will most likely have a module for a different language too
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    City University has a C++ module in Year 2, but you learn Java in your first year as well.
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    If you've been doing c++ for 5 years then why do you need to be taught it again Lool, it's the theory you need not syntax. So any comp sci course will do


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    (Original post by xSnowfall)
    I've been coding in C/C++ for almost 5 years now. I would like to take a degree where I can be taught either of those languages. The courses I have looked into, have only specified C# or Java, which I'd rather not like to learn.
    That's not the point in a CS degree. You're meant to learn the fundamentals with the degree then build on that with some personal studying. Anyway, it's not like picking up a new language is that hard.

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    (Original post by xSnowfall)
    I've been coding in C/C++ for almost 5 years now. I would like to take a degree where I can be taught either of those languages. The courses I have looked into, have only specified C# or Java, which I'd rather not like to learn.
    If you have learnt c and c++ its not so difficult to move to a new language.
    Trust me i did c and c++ and i do better than my peers at java who haven't done any programming.

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    (Original post by xSnowfall)
    I've been coding in C/C++ for almost 5 years now. I would like to take a degree where I can be taught either of those languages. The courses I have looked into, have only specified C# or Java, which I'd rather not like to learn.
    Typically you will learn a functional programming language such as Haskell then an object orientated language such as Java. The university has picked these languages because they successfully allow them to teach the underlying theory behind the language in a conceptual and practical way.


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    DMU do C and C++ in the first year at the moment.

    http://www.dmu.ac.uk/study/courses/u...sc-degree.aspx

    http://www.dmu.ac.uk/study/courses/u...sc-degree.aspx
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    Most uni's do in 2nd/3rd years as mostly optional modules
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    (Original post by bigboateng_)
    If you've been doing c++ for 5 years then why do you need to be taught it again Lool, it's the theory you need not syntax. So any comp sci course will do


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    Too true. Not like a uni c++ course will teach you anything but basic c++ language features anyways. I don't remember the course I did even containing templates.
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    (Original post by xSnowfall)
    I've been coding in C/C++ for almost 5 years now. I would like to take a degree where I can be taught either of those languages. The courses I have looked into, have only specified C# or Java, which I'd rather not like to learn.
    University is not about 'teaching' you rather than you learning how to learn yourself. They can guide you to the knowledge to pass the course, but you still have to put in the effort to learn it yourself.

    That's why people refer to their courses as 'reading' because it literally means having to read up in order to gain the knowledge.

    There are many good books to teach yourself programming languages. Indeed, university courses will set problems in specific languages and you will have to learn them yourself.

    Try any of the SAMS books like 'teach yourself C++ in 21 days'. Not cheap, but also not expensive by university course book standards.
 
 
 
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