Cant go to uni until im 21!!

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    (Original post by Shado123)
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    21 is far, far, far from old don't worry chances are people won't really be able to tell or treat you differently.
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    Why?
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    (Original post by SeanFM)
    21 is far, far, far from old don't worry chances are people won't really be able to tell or treat you differently.
    Thanks for that!
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    (Original post by Nirvana1989-1994)
    Why?
    And its because i have discretionary leave to remain, lived in the UK since i was 6 and im 19 now, but ineligible for funding.
    Il be 21 when i get indefinite leave to remain and eligible for funding
    Funny thing is if i lived in wales or scotland id be fine for funding but its just in england that im ineligible
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    (Original post by Shado123)
    And its because i have discretionary leave to remain, lived in the UK since i was 6 and im 19 now, but ineligible for funding.
    Il be 21 when i get indefinite leave to remain and eligible for funding
    Funny thing is if i lived in wales or scotland id be fine for funding but its just in england that im ineligible
    Aww, I'm sorry . But, like others said, they shouldn't treat you any different at 21.
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    (Original post by Nirvana1989-1994)
    Aww, I'm sorry . But, like others said, they shouldn't treat you any different at 21.
    Really hope so thank you! Most will be 18/19 and i dont want to feel like an outcast when i go
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    (Original post by Shado123)
    Really hope so thank you! Most will be 18/19 and i dont want to feel like an outcast when i go
    I see what you mean, I'll be 20 when I go, but I'm sure there's a mix of ages there.
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    (Original post by Shado123)
    And its because i have discretionary leave to remain, lived in the UK since i was 6 and im 19 now, but ineligible for funding.
    Il be 21 when i get indefinite leave to remain and eligible for funding
    Funny thing is if i lived in wales or scotland id be fine for funding but its just in england that im ineligible
    Huh? I lived in England since I was 8 and now I'm 18, and I am receiving full funding.
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    Not being able to go to uni until you're 21 is not a bad thing. You'll be treated just the same, especially when there's a good portion of people who are in similar situations to you. I was quite surprised about the number of people that started uni saying they were 19 or 20. I've only spoken to one person older than me so far. And unless you tell people they probably won't realise.

    So uni is exactly the same except you get the added bonus of being older. You're more mature, have more life experience behind you and so on. Going to uni a bit later is in my opinion one of the best things you can do to help yourself do well.
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    (Original post by RDKGames)
    Huh? I lived in England since I was 8 and now I'm 18, and I am receiving full funding.
    They're probably not from an EU country?
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    Not being able to go to uni until you're 21 is not a bad thing. You'll be treated just the same, especially when there's a good portion of people who are in similar situations to you. I was quite surprised about the number of people that started uni saying they were 19 or 20. I've only spoken to one person older than me so far. And unless you tell people they probably won't realise.

    So uni is exactly the same except you get the added bonus of being older. You're more mature, have more life experience behind you and so on. Going to uni a bit later is in my opinion one of the best things you can do to help yourself do well.
    Thank you
    Are there any other perks to going to uni at an older age
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    (Original post by Shado123)
    Thank you
    Are there any other perks to going to uni at an older age
    There's loads but some of them are specific to the person and their situation.

    For example with me going to uni later meant I have more disposable income because I was able to save more by working for longer. The result of which is that I have money spare to join societies I'm interested in. Specifically I've joined Archery and am trialing Fencing on Friday. Between them they'd cost £140 and having that income spare means I don't need to worry about whether I'd have enough loan left to eat and pay rent. The generic version is to just have more money.

    And that sort of leads back to the maturity thing. I know a lot of people that spent far too much last week at freshers and are in desperate need of a job. Being that bit older (and hopefully more mature) means you're more able to manage yourself in general. Not to say an 18 year old couldn't live perfectly fine of course, it's just nice to have that little extra experience.

    You have more time to build up life skills like cooking and cleaning. I'm not an amazing cook but I can make food with no trouble. I've seen people struggle to cook things like chicken nuggets. And again I'm not saying 18 year olds can't cook, just that having more experience is nice.

    In general you'll have more experiences. This can manifest in many ways, such as being a more interesting person which opens all sorts of doors, being more confident, more outgoing and so on. And in general it just helps to improve your standard of living.

    You have more time to prepare. If at a younger age you know what you want to do but don't decide to go straight to uni you have time to get to know your discipline. You can try to get relevant work experience, self teach yourself content, work on projects and so on. Not only does this help with your uni application but having an understanding of the content makes university itself easier. Employers like to see people that have an extended interest, who take initiative and work on their own stuff as well.

    Carrying on from that work experience is super helpful later in life. I had 4 years work experience before starting uni, all with the same company. It's only retail but it's still 4 years of dedicated service. I hope to get a position as a student ambassador as well which could potentially add another 3 years work experience. Factor in a potential placement year and all of a sudden I could leave uni with 8 years work experience across a variety of roles, possibly in a relevant industry too. Compare that to your average 18 year old with a part time job at college and maybe a part time job through uni. And this isn't even factoring in what you learn on the job, the money you make and so on.

    On a similar note, opportunities pop up all over the place. For example my 4 years experience were at Sainsbury's. I want to go into IT Security in some way. They may seem completely unrelated but a series of jobs was cropping up close to my leave date that my manager informed me of. I could have applied, I would have already been part of the company and so on. Not what I went for but it was an opportunity that only popped up by being in the right job at the same time. This isn't unique and opportunities crop up all the time. Having more time to appreciate them rather than jumping straight into uni could end up leading to your dream job.

    Another important one is that you have time to really consider if uni is what you want. I didn't go straight to uni because there wasn't a course I wanted to do. When I realised I wanted to go into IT Security I looked at apprenticeships. I applied to IBM and was in the recruitment process for over a year (again, opportunities). I later thought about doing a degree in Electronic Engineering and applied to university. I changed my mind and went back to IT leading to my current situation. This decision making went on for almost 2 years and it's not something I would ever have come to a decision about during my years at college. I'm glad I had time to think it through and decide what I want to do because now I'm on the right course and doing something I'm excited about.

    There's a few of the benefits I can think up off the top of my head, I'm sure there's loads more but you can see how starting uni in your 20's (or later) is only a problem if you let yourself think it's a problem. Instead look at it as an opportunity and make use of the time between now and then.
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    There's loads but some of them are specific to the person and their situation.

    For example with me going to uni later meant I have more disposable income because I was able to save more by working for longer. The result of which is that I have money spare to join societies I'm interested in. Specifically I've joined Archery and am trialing Fencing on Friday. Between them they'd cost £140 and having that income spare means I don't need to worry about whether I'd have enough loan left to eat and pay rent. The generic version is to just have more money.

    And that sort of leads back to the maturity thing. I know a lot of people that spent far too much last week at freshers and are in desperate need of a job. Being that bit older (and hopefully more mature) means you're more able to manage yourself in general. Not to say an 18 year old couldn't live perfectly fine of course, it's just nice to have that little extra experience.

    You have more time to build up life skills like cooking and cleaning. I'm not an amazing cook but I can make food with no trouble. I've seen people struggle to cook things like chicken nuggets. And again I'm not saying 18 year olds can't cook, just that having more experience is nice.

    In general you'll have more experiences. This can manifest in many ways, such as being a more interesting person which opens all sorts of doors, being more confident, more outgoing and so on. And in general it just helps to improve your standard of living.

    You have more time to prepare. If at a younger age you know what you want to do but don't decide to go straight to uni you have time to get to know your discipline. You can try to get relevant work experience, self teach yourself content, work on projects and so on. Not only does this help with your uni application but having an understanding of the content makes university itself easier. Employers like to see people that have an extended interest, who take initiative and work on their own stuff as well.

    Carrying on from that work experience is super helpful later in life. I had 4 years work experience before starting uni, all with the same company. It's only retail but it's still 4 years of dedicated service. I hope to get a position as a student ambassador as well which could potentially add another 3 years work experience. Factor in a potential placement year and all of a sudden I could leave uni with 8 years work experience across a variety of roles, possibly in a relevant industry too. Compare that to your average 18 year old with a part time job at college and maybe a part time job through uni. And this isn't even factoring in what you learn on the job, the money you make and so on.

    On a similar note, opportunities pop up all over the place. For example my 4 years experience were at Sainsbury's. I want to go into IT Security in some way. They may seem completely unrelated but a series of jobs was cropping up close to my leave date that my manager informed me of. I could have applied, I would have already been part of the company and so on. Not what I went for but it was an opportunity that only popped up by being in the right job at the same time. This isn't unique and opportunities crop up all the time. Having more time to appreciate them rather than jumping straight into uni could end up leading to your dream job.

    Another important one is that you have time to really consider if uni is what you want. I didn't go straight to uni because there wasn't a course I wanted to do. When I realised I wanted to go into IT Security I looked at apprenticeships. I applied to IBM and was in the recruitment process for over a year (again, opportunities). I later thought about doing a degree in Electronic Engineering and applied to university. I changed my mind and went back to IT leading to my current situation. This decision making went on for almost 2 years and it's not something I would ever have come to a decision about during my years at college. I'm glad I had time to think it through and decide what I want to do because now I'm on the right course and doing something I'm excited about.

    There's a few of the benefits I can think up off the top of my head, I'm sure there's loads more but you can see how starting uni in your 20's (or later) is only a problem if you let yourself think it's a problem. Instead look at it as an opportunity and make use of the time between now and then.
    Thank you so much, i've really learnt a lot from this!
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    (Original post by Shado123)
    Thank you so much, i've really learnt a lot from this!
    Worth mentioning that obviously my opinion is biased and I don't know what it'd be like if I had gone straight from college. But you get the idea that the age isn't really important.
 
 
 
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