What do most drivers do in this situation?

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    Just wanted opinions on this situation. Its annoying/frustrating and arguably dangerous when this happens. When you are on a A road/or motorway, an exit off it has a long que and cars are in the second lane waiting with indicators on to jump in the que - it holds the lane up and the cars behind are made to slow down and wait. I never use my horn though, i think beeping someone is a bit soft if done out of anger, i just wait till they are in the que.

    However today this situation happened to me. I turned right onto a a A road/dual carriageway with 4 lanes. I didnt know the area and after looking at the sat nav realised i needed to get to the left lane to take the exit but i couldnt join behind even though i was still half a mile or so from the exit. I tried to get in as soon as possible but the cars wouldnt let me in. I was conscious of holding up a van right behind me so kept going looking for some gap. I saw a slight gap so waited, after about 10 secs they let me in. Then the van behind me rushed off and beeped his horn continuously.

    So whats the best thing to do in this situation? What do you tend to do? Do most people just drive on if they cant get in the que and figure out another route home. This is the safest thing but realisticaly what do people do?
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    I wait to get in. The guy behind can honk his horn all he wants, he'd do the same thing
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    As I'm sure you know you'd get an immediate test fail for doing that since you're holding up traffic. If you miss your turning you're supposed to carry on and try and find an alternative route.

    In reality, it's a matter of judgement. If you block the road for too long then you're definitely being a knob, but if you're only stuck for a few seconds or so, it's probably fine to get away with. Just so long as you're not causing a danger, e.g. by going across several lanes to reach the exit, or switching lanes at the very last moment and cutting another driver off.
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    Today's experience has taught us all a lesson which we should all remember the next time we're in that queue. The person on the right trying to come in isn't necessarily a "queue jumper", but possibly somebody who doesn't know the area well, couldn't read the road markings (queuing traffic is obstructing them after all) or simply made a mistake. Nobody would predict that a queue would be over half a mile long, so it wouldn't be reasonable to expect everybody to join the back of the queue, while being psychic enough to determine that this is the queue for that particular exit.

    Officially, if you are caught out alongside a queue you wished you'd joined, you should judge the speed of the queue in relation to the speed of free-flowing traffic on that road. If you can't match your speed and join into the queue without holding up following free-flowing traffic, then you should continue on to another exit.

    If the queue is stationary, then it's a lost cause and you must not stop on a motorway or clearway in order to join a queue from the side. Just carry on to the next exit and find another route.

    In generally congested conditions - where all the lanes are moving slower than usual, then you may get lucky and find a moment alongside the queue where it moves temporarily at a similar speed to you. That's when you can seize the moment to ask to be let in while the gaps between vehicles is larger and without having to change speed significantly.
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    Drive to the front, and wait there, that way you are not blocking anyone, unless it is a small road.

    I wouldnt drive off and find another route unless I knew the area well

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    (Original post by Advisor)
    Today's experience has taught us all a lesson which we should all remember the next time we're in that queue. The person on the right trying to come in isn't necessarily a "queue jumper", but possibly somebody who doesn't know the area well, couldn't read the road markings (queuing traffic is obstructing them after all) or simply made a mistake. Nobody would predict that a queue would be over half a mile long, so it wouldn't be reasonable to expect everybody to join the back of the queue, while being psychic enough to determine that this is the queue for that particular exit.

    Officially, if you are caught out alongside a queue you wished you'd joined, you should judge the speed of the queue in relation to the speed of free-flowing traffic on that road. If you can't match your speed and join into the queue without holding up following free-flowing traffic, then you should continue on to another exit.

    If the queue is stationary, then it's a lost cause and you must not stop on a motorway or clearway in order to join a queue from the side. Just carry on to the next exit and find another route.

    In generally congested conditions - where all the lanes are moving slower than usual, then you may get lucky and find a moment alongside the queue where it moves temporarily at a similar speed to you. That's when you can seize the moment to ask to be let in while the gaps between vehicles is larger and without having to change speed significantly.
    I agree
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    If there's such a huge discrepancy between the speed of the queue and the other lane then it probably isn't a great queue to be joining in the first place.
 
 
 
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