2015: 78% of students experienced mental health issues

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    A survey by the National Union of Student (NUS) has found that 78% of students experienced mental health issues in the past year - with over half of these (54%) reporting that they didn't seek any help for the things they were going through. This is a huge jump from a recent YouGov poll which suggested this number was around 25% of all students.

    University is pushed by many as 'the best time of your life', these figures suggest that the pressure for university to live up to this expectation is infact leading to university life to be the exact opposite of what it's hyped up to be.

    With many students either recently starting their 1st year of university or returning for their 2nd and 3rd year's; moving away from home and with it the safety net of living with their parents not being there anymore and coupled with pressures such as academic stress, trying to fit in and the financial stress that can come with being a student mean that many students struggle and many slip through the net.

    Have you ever experienced a mental health issue whilst studying at university, if so; what advice would you give those who may be feeling stressed at this time? Is there anything more you feel universities could do to try and support those who do experience a mental health problem during their time as a student? Is the support available publicised enough?

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    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk...-a7328836.html
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    Honestly, that's just shocking.
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    I would like to say I am shocked at how high the statistics are but I am not uni is a stressful time for many and no wonder. For a lot of people its the first time they are away from home, the work load can be overwhelming, meeting different people can be daunting.

    I deferred uni due to my own mental health and a little because of my physical health but mainly due to mental health last year and I'm still not back. I did things the wrong way. I didn't tell uni about my problems right from the start so I didn't get any support such as extra time for assessments and things like that. I was ashamed even though my problems were almost lifelong and my previous schools and colleges knew about them. I wanted uni to be a clean slate and didn't want anyone to know. The pressure made me more ill and even when I missed lectures and assignments, I still didn't tell uni. I literally just didn't show up or submit anything. It wasn't until my GP finally contacted uni directly that they found out. I was able to defer and I am due to go back in Oct 2017 but with how slow treatment is going, I don't know if I'll be able to go back by then but I'm not worrying about that atm. Taking things a day at a time :yep:

    How I dealt with things was a perfect example of how people shouldn't deal with MH problems at uni and in general - burying your head in the sand doesn't help anything. My biggest tip would be to do the reverse of what I done. Seek support from your tutors, student services, GP etc asap. If you do have a condition before uni, be sure to let them know so you get the support you deserve and that will hopefully lessen a load on you and make things a little easier. If you do have to defer, don't feel ashamed. Sometimes you need to take a step back for a while to get better and that is ok. Uni will always be there, your health, happiness and wellbeing always has to come first.
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    Doesn't help that many of these problems can be traced back to Academy. The school's aren't helping their students when this starts and let it build up. My own school were highly unhelpful last year when I had an operation that prevented me from returning to school normally after summer. This caused me to stress and worry about the subjects and even rush myself back to recovery and school. This in turn has created further problems for both my mental and physical health which the school have tried to turn a blind eye too.

    The stress placed on young people currently is not healthy. The pressure to do well in school, have a job, have a great social life and still do everything else is overwhelming and I can't imagine the pressure it would be at University. It's my main worry for when I go hopefully next year. I found talking helps but to a certain degree. No one but you is ever going to truly understand your thought process and the thoughts going through your mind. I found talking to some people made it worse as they tried to pass over it or explain about themselves in that situation.
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    Many years ago, a student could go to uni survive on a grant and be happy with a 2.1 or 2.2.

    Now everyone wants a solid 2.1 or a first.
    Students also need a part time job, be a member of at least one society, volunteer for some good cause, work on their professional development, have an active social life and keep fit.

    Perhaps for many students their mental and physical energy is spread too thinly?
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    (Original post by st*r)
    Many years ago, a student could go to uni survive on a grant and be happy with a 2.1 or 2.2.

    Now everyone wants a solid 2.1 or a first.
    Students also need a part time job, be a member of at least one society, volunteer for some good cause, work on their professional development, have an active social life and keep fit.

    Perhaps for many students their mental and physical energy is spread too thinly?
    Everyone NEEDS a 2.1 in today's ever so competitive and demanding job market. With so many choosing uni these days, it seems employers are getting pickier and pickier.
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    (Original post by cbreef)
    Everyone NEEDS a 2.1 in today's ever so competitive and demanding job market. With so many choosing uni these days, it seems employers are getting pickier and pickier.
    Especially with the filtering software that recruitment agencies and HR departments use. I'm mainly doing a degree as a mature student just to get over this hurdle.
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    I would be sceptical of these stats. What are Nus calling Mental health problems.
    Is it actually having a problem or just asking have you ever felt sad or ever been stressed about a assignment or have you ever had a mental breakdown.
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    my dad's mate had a mental breakdown and he basically walked out of his house, bought a tent and stayed in the middle of a field. that's what crippling depression looks like. not being a bit bored and unsatisfied with your life because you don't actually do anything with it.
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    (Original post by Deyesy)

    Have you ever experienced a mental health issue whilst studying at university, if so; what advice would you give those who may be feeling stressed at this time? Is there anything more you feel universities could do to try and support those who do experience a mental health problem during their time as a student? Is the support available publicised enough?

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    Similarly to Spock's Socks , I am not surprised (though I am saddened, obviously) by this statistic :nope:

    My advice to everyone would be:

    a) If you are entering uni with a pre-existing mental health condition, PLEASE register with your uni's disability service ASAP. Ideally before you get there but if not, then as soon as you get there. Have everything in place, just in case you should ever need it. Always have hope but be practical: put in measures to deal with the absolute worst-case scenarios.

    b) If you are entering uni without any such diagnosis but you later feel as though your mental health is sliding, PLEASE reach out to people ASAP. Don't do what I did and wait til you're waaaaay up **** creek without a paddle, to try and get help. It'll bite you in the arse and you'll live to regret it, most likely.

    University counselling services are overstretched, which is even more reason to try and get in there early, if you foresee yourself possibly needing it at any point.

    As for what unis can do, I can only speak of the three unis I have attended in my life. My current one has excellent mental health provision from the disability office and is fairly visible, in that it works with the SU, etc. The second uni I attended had a far smaller team but they were nice and dedicated. As for my first uni, it was fairly appalling tbh, though I am told things are (at least a bit) better now.

    Based on my experiences as an undergrad, I would say that support isn't always publicised enough after Freshers' Week. I also think that most unis could probably benefit from being more transparent about how extenuating circumstances (if given at all) work in their uni and what one has to do and at what point, to register for them and what counts as eligible, so that students can make informed decisions and think about these things in advance if possible, rather than trying to deal with it whilst in an episode/crisis :sadnod:
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    I'm both shocked and not. I knew the numbers would be high (much higher than the YouGov poll), but over three quarters of students?! That's a huge amount. Do you have a source for this? I'm very interested to learn more about it.
    I'm not at a university but I've been to two schools and a college and can say that none of them have been very helpful when it comes to mental health. My college was the most sympathetic and tutors tried to help but just didn't know how. Places of education need to buck up their ideas, fast, because...well, people can and do die as a result of mental illness.
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    I'd be wary of the stats. I very much doubt the data collected was a fair representation, or if it was, that answers were accurate. That said, there's no doubt that there is a problem and it troubles me a-lot because I'm not sure on the exact reason why mental illness is so rampant in these recent decades. My best guess is that it relates to technology (always connected, "multitasking" (less efficient) and related higher stress), high standards (related to the latter), and special-snowflake ideologies propagated in the school system (related to loony lefties). I don't know what the answer is.

    (I wonder if rates of depression increases as a country develops, education increases, and pattern-recognition based IQ goes up - that general correlation holds true, but we all know what the hip thing is to say about causation, and the special case of England is interesting, as I'm not sure our education system has improved enough/at-all over the past decades to justify the decline in mental health for young people - though that could be due to the factors I speculated above.)
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    (Original post by dragonzrmetal)
    I'd be wary of the stats. I very much doubt the data collected was a fair representation. That said, there's no doubt that there is a problem and it troubles me a-lot because I'm not sure on the exact reason why mental illness is so rampant in these recent decades. My best guess is that it relates to technology (always connected, "multitasking" (less efficient) and related higher stress), high standards (related to the latter), and special-snowflake ideologies propagated in the school system (related to loony lefties). I don't know what the answer is.
    I'd say at least one of the reasons is just increased awareness (which technology certainly does play a part in). You don't have to wait to have a full-on breakdown before you're diagnosed anymore.
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    (Original post by thebluepenguins)
    I'd say at least one of the reasons is just increased awareness (which technology certainly does play a part in). You don't have to wait to have a full-on breakdown before you're diagnosed anymore.
    That's true, and although I'm glad it benefits some people, I think overall it's miss-representative. I know plenty of people who've gone and had counselling etc and without being rude, it really looks like they didn't need it - there's this obnoxious romanticism of mental issues going on, and a result, a lot of people making an ado about nothing.
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    has an nyone loooked at the stats and accounted for the difference in figures?
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    (Original post by dragonzrmetal)
    That's true, and although I'm glad it benefits some people, I think overall it's miss-representative. I know plenty of people who've gone and had counselling etc and without being rude, it really looks like they didn't need it - there's this obnoxious romanticism of mental issues going on, and a result, a lot of people making an ado about nothing.
    Hmm. I absolutely hate romanticisation of mental illness, but I think the Internet makes that seem more of a thing than it is. IRL I've met a lot of people with mental health issues and not a single one thinks there's anything mysterious or cute about it (the sort of things teen fiction novels or silly tumblr users associate with mental illness).
    As for the bolded part...at the end of the day, you don't know someone's story. I'm the personification of the word 'stoic', and on more than one occasion someone has implied that I don't actually have depression because they don't know what goes on inside my head, only what I show on the outside. Besides, there's no harm in a bit of therapy if you feel like you need it. It's not like you can overdose on it or anything.
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    I would treat such a claim with extreme scepticism. I suspect this is a self-report survey where people are asked questions like "have you felt anxious?", which is no way to identify those who have mental health problems.

    Unfortunately we have become very keen to pathologize any negative emotions. Getting homesick and feeling down, getting stressed over exams or having a rough time after a relationship breakup are part of the slings and arrows of life and not, in and of themselves, mental health problems.
 
 
 
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