Reproductive anatomy and basic science questions

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    Could anyone explain what these two statements mean?
    'Anterior superior iliac spine and the pubic tubercles are in the same coronal place'
    - I know the anatomy of the pelvis and I know what the coronal place means but I can't envisage this image in my head, can anyone explain what this actually
    means?

    'Pelvic surface of the sacrum faces more downward than foreward'
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    Are you sure it doesn't say 'the same coronal*plane'?

    If it's 'plane', not 'place', then I think what it's suggesting is that if a person was standing up straight and you drew a perfectly vertical line through their ASIS, it would also pass through the pubic tubercles - i.e. the ASIS is neither further forward (i.e. more ventral) nor further back (i.e. more dorsal) than the pubic tubercles.*
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    What is meant by
    'the true pelvis defines the birth canal'?
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    In a sagittal midline [dividing, left and right] of a female pelvis, what structures are aligned along the midline from anterior to posterior ?

    Really confused with this question..
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    (Original post by AqsaMx)
    What is meant by
    'the true pelvis defines the birth canal'?
    There is a 'true pelvis' and a 'false pelvis'.

    Do understand the anatomical planes? It should help you understand the question.

    There are some good anatomy apps if you're struggling to picture things in 3d
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    (Original post by ForestCat)
    There is a 'true pelvis' and a 'false pelvis'.

    Do understand the anatomical planes? It should help you understand the question.

    There are some good anatomy apps if you're struggling to picture things in 3d
    I do understand the anatomical planes, but I am struggling a bit with the anatomy so I'll definitely download some of the apps. Thanks!
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    So, I've started the Pelvis/Pelvic floor and although I understand most of it, some of it is difficult to understand. What are the best books for anatomy in general with lots of labelled diagrams?
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    Name:  Screen Shot 2016-09-28 at 19.31.42.jpg
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    I know anteverted means tilted forward and anteflexed means bending forward but could anyone apply that to these 4 pictures, and explain which one is which?

    Would the first one be antiverted because it's slightly tilted forward? And the second retroflexed? Unsure about the final two..
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    What 4 pictures?
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    (Original post by AqsaMx)
    Name:  Screen Shot 2016-09-28 at 19.31.42.jpg
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    I know anteverted means tilted forward and anteflexed means bending forward but could anyone apply that to these 4 pictures, and explain which one is which?

    Would the first one be antiverted because it's slightly tilted forward? And the second retroflexed? Unsure about the final two..
    I would say 1) anteverted 2) retroflexed 3) anteflexed 4) retroverted

    The difference is the 2nd and 4th are both pointed backwards ultimately, hence 'retro'. But the 2nd initially points forwards and so flexed backwards. The last points backwards initially and then backwards fully as well, so the whole thing is retro verted. Equally the 1st and 3rd ultimately end up pointing anterior - 'ante' but the 1st points anteriorly all the way 'verted' and the 3rd changes direction via a flexion hence 'flexed'. I hope that makes sense.
    Also as a medical student, you are unlikely to need to know this. Unless you want to go into Obs and Gynae in the future. So I wouldn't stress.
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    (Original post by AqsaMx)
    Name:  Screen Shot 2016-09-28 at 19.31.42.jpg
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    I know anteverted means tilted forward and anteflexed means bending forward but could anyone apply that to these 4 pictures, and explain which one is which?

    Would the first one be antiverted because it's slightly tilted forward? And the second retroflexed? Unsure about the final two..
    With regards to female pelvic anatomy flexion and version are describing two different things and therefore both should be stated as either ante- or retro-.

    Version described the relatioship between the long axis of the uterus and the long axis of the vagina, whereas flexion simply describes the bending of the uterus itself (aka relationship of the fundus compared to the cervix).

    For your pictures therefore:

    1 - anteverted anteflexed
    2 - anteverted retroflexed
    3 - retroverted anteflexed
    4 - retroverted retroflexed
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    I understand that if fertilisation doesn't occur, the corpus luteam degrades spontaneously due to no hCG present [could anyone explain why hCG causes this to happen?].
    Then I also understand that oestrogen and progesterone levels decrease rapidly so endometrial support is lost. However, in my notes it says uterine prostaglandins leads to vasoconstriction and then tissue death, Could anyone explain simply how this happens and the whole uterine prostaglandins part? Thank you so much!
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    I'm trying to get my head around the formation of the morula and the Bilaminer Embryonic Germ Disc - could anyone explain or does anyone know any good sites/videos/animations for this?
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    So, I've finally understood gastrulation as a process. I was wondering if anyone could explain how errors in gastrulation can result in the congenital malformation of sirenomelia [mermaid syndrome].
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    Finally got my head around it but would still like a video/animation to consolidate what I've learnt. Anyone??
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    Is it because prostaglandins [hormone-like substances] cause vasoconstriction to occur therefore reducing blood supply to the endometrial lining so the tissues it's composed of lose oxygen, resulting in tissue death?

    Anyone confirm and add to this?
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    (Original post by AqsaMx)
    Is it because prostaglandins [hormone-like substances] cause vasoconstriction to occur therefore reducing blood supply to the endometrial lining so the tissues it's composed of lose oxygen, resulting in tissue death?

    Anyone confirm and add to this?
    Sorry but prostaglandins are well known vasodilators
    #1

    (Original post by Farmacee)
    Sorry but prostaglandins are well known vasodilators
    So, why does it say prostaglandins-vasoconstriction-tissue death..?
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    So, why does it say prostaglandins-vasoconstriction-tissue death..?
    Where does it say this?
    #1

    (Original post by ForestCat)
    Where does it say this?
    On my lecturer's slide..
 
 
 
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