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So I'm in year 10 and I want to be a police constable

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    Would the met be hiring at 2020 or would it be full up as I'm dead set on becoming a police constable but I don't know if they would be hiring at that time period and don't know if I should waste my time studying for it ..
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    (Original post by Batuhxn)
    Would the met be hiring at 2020 or would it be full up as I'm dead set on becoming a police constable but I don't know if they would be hiring at that time period and don't know if I should waste my time studying for it ..
    The met need to recruit new staff all the time to replace people who leave/retire.
    Nobody can possibly know for sure how many new constables they will need to hire/train in 2020. A lot will depend on government decisions on police funding. I'm sure their HR will have some planning assumptions.

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    (Original post by Batuhxn)
    Would the met be hiring at 2020 or would it be full up as I'm dead set on becoming a police constable but I don't know if they would be hiring at that time period and don't know if I should waste my time studying for it ..
    Getting good GCSE and A-levels are the things you should concentrate on - if plan A fails, these qualifications will open up a whole heap of other opportunities.

    Why don't you drop into your local Police station and they will put you in touch with their careers advisory people.
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    (Original post by uberteknik)
    Getting good GCSE and A-levels are the things you should concentrate on - if plan A fails, these qualifications will open up a whole heap of other opportunities.

    Why don't you drop into your local Police station and they will put you in touch with their careers advisory people.
    I don't know if this is how I reply but I'll try thanks , and luckily I have 2 police constables that roam around my school lunch and break areas so I'll talk to one of them ?
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    (Original post by gdunne42)
    The met need to recruit new staff all the time to replace people who leave/retire.
    Nobody can possibly know for sure how many new constables they will need to hire/train in 2020. A lot will depend on government decisions on police funding. I'm sure their HR will have some planning assumptions.

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    Thanks bro I'll just focus on getting good levels and when I'm at the legal age I'll give in my CV and try my best , also can I do anything in my teen years to make my CV look better ?
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    (Original post by Batuhxn)
    Thanks bro I'll just focus on getting good levels and when I'm at the legal age I'll give in my CV and try my best , also can I do anything in my teen years to make my CV look better ?

    https://nationalcareersservice.direc...ceOfficer.aspx

    Police cadets
    http://content.met.police.uk/Site/cadets


    Plus i bet there are soem things to do with youth and community justice.
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    (Original post by Batuhxn)
    Thanks bro I'll just focus on getting good levels and when I'm at the legal age I'll give in my CV and try my best , also can I do anything in my teen years to make my CV look better ?
    Not much in your GCSE years, though being involved in the community in some way looks good and the met have a cadets programme that might interest you. Oh and obviously it's better if you keep out of trouble

    Edit: beat me to it tigger
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    If you're still interested in joining when you reach eighteen, you could look at joining the specials. They're usually recruiting even when other positions are closed, as they are now.

    Once in the specials, you can apply to get a transfer to a full time officer's position later on (usually after two years on the beat). That way you also get to learn a bit more about what the police do, and you can see if you really want to work there full time.

    If you want to join because because you think people will respect you, I would consider thinking again. If you want to join because you want to help people then I hope to see you out on patrol in a few year's time
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    (Original post by Batuhxn)
    Would the met be hiring at 2020 or would it be full up as I'm dead set on becoming a police constable but I don't know if they would be hiring at that time period and don't know if I should waste my time studying for it ..
    Good on you
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    (Original post by sek510i)
    If you're still interested in joining when you reach eighteen, you could look at joining the specials. They're usually recruiting even when other positions are closed, as they are now.

    Once in the specials, you can apply to get a transfer to a full time officer's position later on (usually after two years on the beat). That way you also get to learn a bit more about what the police do, and you can see if you really want to work there full time.

    If you want to join because because you think people will respect you, I would consider thinking again. If you want to join because you want to help people then I hope to see you out on patrol in a few year's time
    i personally want to join because i often like helping people and i feel good after i do it and whenever i see a video of the police in action or real police in action i get the chills and have respect for them.
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    (Original post by Batuhxn)
    i personally want to join because i often like helping people and i feel good after i do it and whenever i see a video of the police in action or real police in action i get the chills and have respect for them.
    Please make sure that you fully research the role of a PC; do not just watch some videos and make assumptions about what the job will entail. Being a police officer is 2% excitement 98% routine. What these TV shows/videos don't reveal is the sheer amount of paperwork involved after an arrest (e.g. nick someone for a shoplifting offence and you could spend 6-7 hours in custody).

    Also please bare in mind that part of the role involves going to deaths - this may involve hangings, people hit by trains, decomposed bodies (3 weeks - 3 months+), bodies found in rivers after a long time etc. You will be required to search these bodies for signs of injury and may very well assist with body/body parts recovery. So make sure you are not squeamish!

    You will find that there is very little support from the public, government and media nowadays which means morale is low - officers do extraordinary things every single day (as do paramedics/fire fighters/ nurses etc) and it is rarely reported, while the negative things are. Do not expect thanks on a regular basis in this job, even if you go above and beyond.

    To join most forces nowadays you need to obtain a "Certificate in the Knowledge of Policing", which costs around £900-£1000 and can be done over 10 weekends or online at your own pace before completing a final exam. I would say get good GCSE/A levels simply so that you have a backup plan. Lots of officers want to leave due to low morale but don't due to a lack of avenues/qualifications. Can't say if the Met will be recruiting in 2020 but the way things are going most forces will be recruiting to fill ever-increasing gaps.

    Sorry to highlight the negatives but they need to be stated just so that you are aware. Of course the job has positive aspects and I don't want to put you off but far too many people join/want to join for the wrong reasons or without realising what they'll actually be doing. Any questions just ask (although please note I did not serve with the Met so I am unaware of their workings).
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    I am aware of everything here but aren't the medical examiners meant to check the bodies for signs of entry by weapon etc
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    (Original post by Batuhxn)
    I am aware of everything here but aren't the medical examiners meant to check the bodies for signs of entry by weapon etc
    Basically when a PC attends a sudden death their main initial task (as well as the preservation of life and limb when applicable) is to determine whether the death was suspicious or non-suspicious, as this will effect what happens next.

    In order to make this determination the body/surrounding area must be examined for any signs of a struggle/break-in/marks and wounds etc. This is also done for possible suicides (which could have been staged) and sometimes decomposed bodies; it depends on how long the body has remained undiscovered.

    So for example if you were called to someone who has been found hanged, after "cutting them down" you would have to sensitively carry out a brief search of the body to make sure that there were no suspicious marks or wounds.

    Only after an officer reasonably believes that a death is suspicious will the scenes of crime unit attend and a whole bunch of other stuff takes place, and you'd suddenly be factoring in cross contamination and evidence.

    Just for further info; this process also occurs when people are hit by trains. The police must determine whether the death is suspicious/non-suspicious and only once it is confirmed as non-sus (through CCTV/witnesses etc) will officers start the gruesome task of body recovery. This is again so that no evidence is lost in case it is a suspicious death.

    Hope that helps.
 
 
 
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