Missing guns. Watch

Apollo
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#21
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#21
(Original post by 6+6=12)
Syria has, and will for the forseeable future allow its citizens to continue using the Syrian/Iraq border.
And yet many times you agreed to bar "undesireables" from entering Iraq, and yet now you take no action.

We cannot be held to account for the actions of all our citizens, to suggest we should be is beyond absurd. Perhaps if the US was so concerned about its invasion force coming under attack, it would do well to advise its puppet government to seal the borders, rather than simply shift the blame to Syria.
We already did, and they already have. And yet, syrian terrorists continue to show up in iraq. Puzzling. Speaking of puppet governments, I'm sure the Lebanese citizens would have something to say about that. Kill any more Prime Ministers lately?

It would also help your security if you didn't lose weapons that will most likely end up in the hands of these aggressors.
Syria thanks the RSA delegate for his rebuttal of the US' underhand remarks.
These weapons were delivered to Iraqi security forces. This is war, weapons inevitably fall into the wrong hands. Whether or not 200,000 weapons have been taken by insurgents remains to be seen.
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Ethereal
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#22
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#22
(Original post by Apollo)
I have done no such thing.
You made a direct reference to Syrian suicide bombers in a way that implied they were state sponsered.

If these subversive groups were attempting to travel to another country and commit acts of terror, then yes, we would do all we could to "discourage" that. During Saddam's regime, it was nearly impossible for someone for someone the Iraqi's didn't want to pass through the Syrian/Iraqi border. Today, it's more a sieve than a border.


Interestng that you admit Iraq is now less secure than during the regime you toppeled.

With regards you doing all you can to discourage the individuals commiting acts of terror; you haven't exactly stopped it in your own country so how would you stop them going across to another? Your borders are so open you don't even have an idea how many people cross them every day yet you are expecting Syria to have a higher level of border control than you can acheive.



*cough* invasion of lesotho *cough*
(OOC I don't know anything about this so in time honoured MUN fashion I am going to defend my country anyway)

Was this invasion widely criticised by other governments, humaitarian and aid organizations, and civil liberties organizations as being illegal? Were we accused of severel serious breaches of international conventions by people such as the ICRC?

No, you can't. That would be an empty promise and a waste of time. These weapons are missing, not known to be held by insurgents. You could very well be asking for an assurance that we won't misplace paperwork.
So the US has absolutely no intention whatsoever of finding out what went wrong and taking steps to prevent it happening again? That is a derelection of moral duty in the highest degree.
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Apollo
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#23
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#23
(Original post by Ethereal)
You made a direct reference to Syrian suicide bombers in a way that implied they were state sponsered.
Not at all. We asked that Syria prevent their (as in Syrian) suicide bombers from entering Iraq.

Interestng that you admit Iraq is now less secure than during the regime you toppeled
We have done no such thing. Iraq sealed it's border, Syria didn't.

With regards you doing all you can to discourage the individuals commiting acts of terror; you haven't exactly stopped it in your own country so how would you stop them going across to another? Your borders are so open you don't even have an idea how many people cross them every day yet you are expecting Syria to have a higher level of border control than you can acheive.
Hence why legislation is well under way that will step up border security. Besides, the two scenarios are hardly comparable. If suicide bombers were streaming into our country, we would obviously act with more urgency.

(OOC I don't know anything about this so in time honoured MUN fashion I am going to defend my country anyway)

Was this invasion widely criticised by other governments, humaitarian and aid organizations, and civil liberties organizations as being illegal? Were we accused of severel serious breaches of international conventions by people such as the ICRC?
Let's just say that serious questions remain about the true intentions of the RSA and and desires of the Lesothian government.

So the US has absolutely no intention whatsoever of finding out what went wrong and taking steps to prevent it happening again? That is a derelection of moral duty in the highest degree.
Where on earth did we say that? We've already said that the Pentagon is attempting to track these weapons. Of course we can't "promise" that this (if you believe the weapons have been stolen) won't happen again, how could we possibly be expected to guarantee this won't happen again? The Pentagon is also reviewing distribution strategies.
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A Y A Z
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#24
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#24
We would love an update.
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Apollo
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#25
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#25
So would we. Unfortunately, there isn't one to give.
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A Y A Z
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#26
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#26
We trust the US is doing all it can to get those weapons back?
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Apollo
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#27
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#27
Assuming they're really lost, of course. We aren't exactly thrilled about the situation; they're our troops out there.
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anonymous1985
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#28
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#28
Tuvalu would like to say that we don't hold America responsible for this incident as it was practically certain that some weaponry would go missing. 80,000 pistols may seem to be a large amount, but it truly is only a fraction of the total amount being shipped. Tuvalu would also like to remind the U.A.E that the weapons can just as easily be bought illegally from neighbouring regions. The U.S.A appears to be as regretful as everyone else in this situation. Tavulu would like to know form the US though whether security is deemed to be tightening concerning shipping of weaponry to the East?
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A Y A Z
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#29
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#29
How can America not be held responsible? They've agreed to losing those weapons! We don't care about the 'total amount of weapons involved', 80,000itself is a very large number and a cause for concern.

Weapons bought off neighbouring states is a different matter all together; that said, you can buy weapons anywhere and everywhere in the world.

The US 'appears' to be regretful alright; we don't care. We would just like to know what it is doing to find those weapons.
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ukebert
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#30
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#30
Liechtenstein is troubled at this unfortunate turn of events, but thinks that attempting to recover the missing weapons will merely escalate tensions in the area. What should be done however is make sure that this situation will not happen again.
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Apollo
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#31
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#31
(Original post by The Anthropologist)
Tuvalu would like to say that we don't hold America responsible for this incident as it was practically certain that some weaponry would go missing. 80,000 pistols may seem to be a large amount, but it truly is only a fraction of the total amount being shipped. Tuvalu would also like to remind the U.A.E that the weapons can just as easily be bought illegally from neighbouring regions. The U.S.A appears to be as regretful as everyone else in this situation. Tavulu would like to know form the US though whether security is deemed to be tightening concerning shipping of weaponry to the East?
It's hard to say that shipping security needs to be tightened because we simply don't know where they are. It may not be a case of needing increased security at all. Right now the pentagon is re-examining distribution methods, but appropriate action will be taken once conclusive evidence of what happened is found.
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brimstone
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#32
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#32
(Original post by The Anthropologist)
Tuvalu would like to say that we don't hold America responsible for this incident as it was practically certain that some weaponry would go missing. 80,000 pistols may seem to be a large amount, but it truly is only a fraction of the total amount being shipped.
India condemns the Tuvaluese (?) representative for his reckless comments. How can America not be responsible?
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lodzinski
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#33
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#33
'that some weaponry would go missing??' it isn't a batch of CDs that have fallen off the back of a truck or some knock off wallets! these are instruments of death, and any loss or misplacement of such items is a highly serious issue. nontheless, we understand the issues surrounding the delivery of ordinance to warzones, and can understand the pressure on the US at this time, and can only hope that this will not happen again, and that this will be a lesson to all of the need for the maximum possible security.
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A Y A Z
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#34
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#34
Easy guys, hes new. So are alot of people here.
If they make a mistake, just tell them to make it right!
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Craghyrax
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#35
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#35
(Original post by brimstone)
India condemns the Tuvaluese (?) representative for his reckless comments. How can America not be responsible?
Tuvali, in all likelihood.
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Craghyrax
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#36
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#36
(Original post by A Y A Z)
Easy guys, hes new. So are alot of people here.
If they make a mistake, just tell them to make it right!
Exactly.
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Catsmeat
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#37
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#37
(Original post by A Y A Z)
How can America not be held responsible? They've agreed to losing those weapons! We don't care about the 'total amount of weapons involved', 80,000itself is a very large number and a cause for concern.

Weapons bought off neighbouring states is a different matter all together; that said, you can buy weapons anywhere and everywhere in the world.

The US 'appears' to be regretful alright; we don't care. We would just like to know what it is doing to find those weapons.
Poland would also like to register its concern over the loss of these weapons.

Whilst the UAEs speculation that they are in the hands of the insurgency is unfounded, it does clarify a particular concern for the safety of Iraq's continued development towards democracy and stability.

Poland would like to reaffirm the UAEs request to know what America is doing to retrieve these weapons, and would also like to know how such logistical errors will be avoided in the future?
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dismal_laundry
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#38
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#38
Denmark is concerned about the loss of the weapons. These may also find their way into the hands of insurgent groupings in other highly unstable countries, Afghanistan for example.
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