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Law Conversion Course Advice GDL

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    I graduated from university last summer, in a completely unrelated degree. However after doing some work within a legal department I have become interested in studying a law conversion course and wondering what advice people would give for going down this route?

    I have very limited knowledge of the law other than what has come up from my work, so if there was any beginners books someone could recommend so I can prepare what to expect from the course.
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    (Original post by Ems_22)
    I graduated from university last summer, in a completely unrelated degree. However after doing some work within a legal department I have become interested in studying a law conversion course and wondering what advice people would give for going down this route?

    I have very limited knowledge of the law other than what has come up from my work, so if there was any beginners books someone could recommend so I can prepare what to expect from the course.
    Hi there! Specific advice is a little difficult without knowing what area of law or whether it's the Bar or solicitor route you are considering. However, if you're considering doing the GDL, you will likely want to look into funding options at some point - which is usually a TC with a firm (solicitor route) or a scholarship from one of the Inns of Court (barrister route).*

    If you're not sure on your route yet, the best thing to do is apply for vacation schemes and mini pupillages so you can see what you enjoy.*

    As for beginner textbooks, there isn't really a book on general law that you read - you tend to get prescribed different textbooks for different subjects. In any case, reading textbooks is terribly dull unless you know you're reading for something specific! I'd recommend looking up a few basic cases/concepts that you start looking at as part of the course - e.g. offer and acceptance in contract (see Carlill v Carbolic Smoke Ball Co - you can google it). This ought to give you an idea of whether you can stomach the GDL, which costs a lot of money if you don't like it after all.
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    (Original post by Ems_22)
    I graduated from university last summer, in a completely unrelated degree. However after doing some work within a legal department I have become interested in studying a law conversion course and wondering what advice people would give for going down this route?

    I have very limited knowledge of the law other than what has come up from my work, so if there was any beginners books someone could recommend so I can prepare what to expect from the course.
    If its solicitor you want, then get a TC and put your efforts in that direction. Hopefully it will be one of the better commercial firms, who in turn will pay your FDL and LPC for you. Not a fan of self funding if you can persuade someone else to pay. If the legal department where you were cna take you for x months, then an opportunity to get further experience on the table and make contacts that could make it easier to open doors if you did well.
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    You are doing the right thing by gaining legal work experience first. Too many people go into the GDL with little understanding of the sector (in my opinion).

    It really depends on which area of law you are looking to get into. If it is more commercial, then continue to build up your CV with open days/work experience and apply for vacation schemes this year. You will find firms who are willing to sponsor you through the GDL course, and then the LPC. If you are looking at more of the criminal/family areas of law, then it is more likely you will need to self-fund.

    As for the course itself, my knowledge is limited as to how to prepare. From seeing people go through it, the only advice given is just keeping on top of modules once you have started. It is those who fall behind who tend to struggle more when it comes to assessments and depending on how you are assessed, you can be juggling very different modules where the style of learning or theory contrasts greatly against another module.
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    If I was going for a book, then i'd almost say dont bother. You just need to pass the exams. You could nip to your uni bookshop and look at books on passing law exams. I've seen a few in my time. Toy should pick it up ok if your degree or A levels had any essay writing in them.
 
 
 
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