Social Life at LSE

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    Hey guys. I've heard a lot of people saying that the social life is pretty bad at LSE. I just don't know what to believe! I'm thinking of applying for Anthropology but I've heard it's impossible to make friends and that people never go out. Is that true? It seems like such a good uni.
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    Yup I've heard that too.

    A massive sausage fest apparently. Boring nerds, posh *****, Nigerian ****boys, fat Chinese kids who all dress like their favourite rapper.

    If you have a decent personality you won't fit in.
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    I'd be very interested to hear where you guys got this stuff from.
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    Apply for accommodation at Passfield or Carr Saunders and your social life will be pretty typical of any other uni. It's not the most social university - of course it isn't - but it definitely can be social. Some people go out multiple times weekly, some never do. If you like going out you'll find the people that do.
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    (Original post by JohnGreek)
    I'd be very interested to hear where you guys got this stuff from.
    SR mainly! I'm by no means saying its true. Do you go there?
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    (Original post by p0laris)
    Apply for accommodation at Passfield or Carr Saunders and your social life will be pretty typical of any other uni. It's not the most social university - of course it isn't - but it definitely can be social. Some people go out multiple times weekly, some never do. If you like going out you'll find the people that do.
    Ah ok thanks, this was helpful. Did you enjoy your time there?
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    (Original post by LizzyDymond)
    SR mainly! I'm by no means saying its true. Do you go there?
    Yep - first year. While I can certainly identify issues with the social life at LSE, the stereotype of it being full of rahs and cliquey Asian kids couldn't be further from the truth. I'll expand on what I mean by this tomorrow if you want me to.
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    (Original post by LizzyDymond)
    Ah ok thanks, this was helpful. Did you enjoy your time there?
    Still there atm and it is much more social than I expected tbh. Something else I remembered that might help - there is actually a student union night out weekly - if the uni had no people who went out, this wouldn't exist!
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    (Original post by JohnGreek)
    Yep - first year. While I can certainly identify issues with the social life at LSE, the stereotype of it being full of rahs and cliquey Asian kids couldn't be further from the truth. I'll expand on what I mean by this tomorrow if you want me to.
    could you elaborate on this?
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    (Original post by Caedite eos)
    could you elaborate on this?
    Yep

    The whole "rich Nigerian/Asian" stereotype is very rarely seen around LSE. Most of the people who come from African countries, in fact, have lived in the UK for most of their lives, and behave in a fairly decent ways (at least the ones that I've encountered). The overseas Asian students, meanwhile, are some of the humblest people I've met. You don't need to go to a super-wealthy private school in Singapore to get to an international university - state schools offer the same support, and most government ministries offer a number of high-paying scholarships to those who promise to return and work in their country after graduation (a similar system applies to Hong Kong). This means that, short of coming across as arrogant, most Asian students at LSE are, in fact, fairly serious academic weapons who have more or less sorted what direction they wanna take in life and make most of what London offers. You'd be surprised at how hard some of them party

    In terms of halls, the only issue that I have is that certain ones are chock full of the richer internationals who are often unwilling to chat to others in general. High Holborn is often cited as a must avoid, due to the way in which you're going to have to be in contact with your flatmates a lot as a result of how the flats are structured (it's uncatered, and you share a kitchen and toilet with several others), and the fact that the only people who can afford it are fairly wealthy. My hall was superb, in that it has a large bar that many frequent, a good mix of internationals and Home/EU students, and a decent committee that put on plenty of events that gave Freshers' Week some structure.

    The myth about foreigners not speaking English is just that - all of them have a capacity to speak English (remember the IELTS requirement?), and, indeed, countries such as HK and Singapore speak English as an administrative language alongside more native tongues such as Mandarin, Canton, etc. Virtually all the people I've met from these places have a high enough level of English not to impede day to day communication. The real issue can be found in the far smaller society of mainland Chinese, who have not had the same exposure to English and often appear exceedingly polite or frigid because they don't feel comfortable enough with the intricacies of it.

    Regarding social cliqueing during teaching time, whether this happens in your course depends a lot on what you're studying. In A&F, which is dominated by Asian students, one may feel a bit left out, particularly considering that their majority gives them the comfort to speak in their native language in front of everyone else. My law lectures, on the other side, couldn't be farther from that. As for people only hanging out with others from their country, I've seen it happen on occasion, and many at LSE do openly acknowledge (and lambast it), but there's such a wide variety of students in societies and halls that it shouldn't be an issue. I've personally hung out with a group of friends who range from Greek to Iraqi, and I can honestly say that globalisation has made us feel more intimate with each other than one would have expected based on the cultural difference.

    The main structural issues I feel are present are that a sizeable part of halls are taken by first year Master's and General Course students, who, while being perfectly good people, tend to be 2-3 years older than the freshers and often don't socialise as much in the communal areas (this is untrue for a couple of GC students I've met from the US, but they are the exception). Secondly, the large distance between halls means that you can't really go about setting up a social circle with people from other places until societies start kicking up into gear the second and third week. I've managed to avoid this with a few people I knew from different halls before I came to LSE, but your social circle will largely be limited to your accomodation at first. However, for those glorifying the collegiate systems of Oxbridge and Durham, this cannot in itself be seen as too bad a thing, considering that the popular halls cater to a minimum of 300-400 people (with Bankside, the largest, having 600+).
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    (Original post by JohnGreek)
    Yep

    The whole "rich Nigerian/Asian" stereotype is very rarely seen around LSE. Most of the people who come from African countries, in fact, have lived in the UK for most of their lives, and behave in a fairly decent ways (at least the ones that I've encountered). The overseas Asian students, meanwhile, are some of the humblest people I've met. You don't need to go to a super-wealthy private school in Singapore to get to an international university - state schools offer the same support, and most government ministries offer a number of high-paying scholarships to those who promise to return and work in their country after graduation (a similar system applies to Hong Kong). This means that, short of coming across as arrogant, most Asian students at LSE are, in fact, fairly serious academic weapons who have more or less sorted what direction they wanna take in life and make most of what London offers. You'd be surprised at how hard some of them party

    In terms of halls, the only issue that I have is that certain ones are chock full of the richer internationals who are often unwilling to chat to others in general. High Holborn is often cited as a must avoid, due to the way in which you're going to have to be in contact with your flatmates a lot as a result of how the flats are structured (it's uncatered, and you share a kitchen and toilet with several others), and the fact that the only people who can afford it are fairly wealthy. My hall was superb, in that it has a large bar that many frequent, a good mix of internationals and Home/EU students, and a decent committee that put on plenty of events that gave Freshers' Week some structure.

    The myth about foreigners not speaking English is just that - all of them have a capacity to speak English (remember the IELTS requirement?), and, indeed, countries such as HK and Singapore speak English as an administrative language alongside more native tongues such as Mandarin, Canton, etc. Virtually all the people I've met from these places have a high enough level of English not to impede day to day communication. The real issue can be found in the far smaller society of mainland Chinese, who have not had the same exposure to English and often appear exceedingly polite or frigid because they don't feel comfortable enough with the intricacies of it.

    Regarding social cliqueing during teaching time, whether this happens in your course depends a lot on what you're studying. In A&F, which is dominated by Asian students, one may feel a bit left out, particularly considering that their majority gives them the comfort to speak in their native language in front of everyone else. My law lectures, on the other side, couldn't be farther from that. As for people only hanging out with others from their country, I've seen it happen on occasion, and many at LSE do openly acknowledge (and lambast it), but there's such a wide variety of students in societies and halls that it shouldn't be an issue. I've personally hung out with a group of friends who range from Greek to Iraqi, and I can honestly say that globalisation has made us feel more intimate with each other than one would have expected based on the cultural difference.

    The main structural issues I feel are present are that a sizeable part of halls are taken by first year Master's and General Course students, who, while being perfectly good people, tend to be 2-3 years older than the freshers and often don't socialise as much in the communal areas (this is untrue for a couple of GC students I've met from the US, but they are the exception). Secondly, the large distance between halls means that you can't really go about setting up a social circle with people from other places until societies start kicking up into gear the second and third week. I've managed to avoid this with a few people I knew from different halls before I came to LSE, but your social circle will largely be limited to your accomodation at first. However, for those glorifying the collegiate systems of Oxbridge and Durham, this cannot in itself be seen as too bad a thing, considering that the popular halls cater to a minimum of 300-400 people (with Bankside, the largest, having 600+).
    This was really helpful, thanks.
    Could you also give you opinion on Carr Saunders vs Rosebery hall since these are the two I would apply to if I get an offer.
    Also do you know the international makeup of the history course at LSE? Would I be right in saying the essay based degrees tend to have a greater domestic intake than courses like AF?
    Thanks for your insight mate
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    (Original post by Caedite eos)
    This was really helpful, thanks.
    Could you also give you opinion on Carr Saunders vs Rosebery hall since these are the two I would apply to if I get an offer.
    Also do you know the international makeup of the history course at LSE? Would I be right in saying the essay based degrees tend to have a greater domestic intake than courses like AF?
    Thanks for your insight mate
    I honestly don't know that much about these halls, other than that they have the highest proportion of home students and are fairly close to the UCL ones. They're reputed to be quite sociable (at least from the 2 people I met who go there), even though they're not that big. If you come down to choosing a hall, the bar, whether you share a room with others, and the diversity of transport options to get to LSE should also be considerations - they may prove to be the deciding factor.

    A hall being catered (dinners in particular) will also do loads in improving sociability, as people sit together at the end of the day and get to chat to new people and reinforce their ties with acquaintances. With everyone having different schedules, being able to catch up towards the end of the day is a massive bonus.

    I think that qualitative subjects are fairly diverse (note: this is not the same as saying that they are 100% British), even though I only know one guy who's doing History, as it's not a very large course. Generally speaking, I wouldn't worry too much about the composition of the students - few people make friendships around lectures later on. Having one or two decently close friends from it should be enough, and I'm sure that you could find some in any subject you apply to (including A&F and Maths with/and Econ).
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    (Original post by JohnGreek)
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    Hi,
    I am a postgrad. I received an offer for Msc A&F and will be starting school in Sept 2017.

    I was wondering if it is better to stay at one of the college halls or if private housing was the way to go (in terms of safety, distance from the school, flatmates and rent among other things).

    Also, just curious, what course are you studying and where are you staying this year?

    Thanks.
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    (Original post by swkr)
    Hi,
    I am a postgrad. I received an offer for Msc A&F and will be starting school in Sept 2017.

    I was wondering if it is better to stay at one of the college halls or if private housing was the way to go (in terms of safety, distance from the school, flatmates and rent among other things).

    Also, just curious, what course are you studying and where are you staying this year?

    Thanks.
    College halls - quite a few postgrads stay there and they're as safe as the inter-collegiate/private ones (note that not all intercollegiate halls are owned privately, as many are owned by the University of London).
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    PMed you the rest on your wall.
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    I'm pretty nervous about going to LSE purely because of what I've heard about its social life... it sounds stupid but I'm a fairly uncultured, basic person who enjoys going out and getting absolutely rat-arsed. I'm no good at being fake and am really hoping I meet some down-to-earth, approachable people. Do these people exist at LSE? Haha :P

    I've also been told that a good way of making decent friends is by joining a sports social - is this true?
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    (Original post by geob96)
    I'm pretty nervous about going to LSE purely because of what I've heard about its social life... it sounds stupid but I'm a fairly uncultured, basic person who enjoys going out and getting absolutely rat-arsed. I'm no good at being fake and am really hoping I meet some down-to-earth, approachable people. Do these people exist at LSE? Haha :P

    I've also been told that a good way of making decent friends is by joining a sports social - is this true?
    Yes

    You're thinking of the AU Carol
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    The opinion of someone who went there And left said It was quiet And the conversations were really mature. Most of the applicants arr foreign too. This was Someone I lives with who previoisly attended It had said about it.
 
 
 
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