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    (Original post by mrsmann)
    For god's sake, stop saying "I can't believe no one did anything." YOU wouldn't have if you were in that position. You would be **** scared and extremely shocked. If you think you're so much of a hero then be a policeman. It's just stupid to say "omg I'm so disgusted at people that didn't do anything," if a 20 year old's that strong you wouldn't dare move.
    How do you know how strong he was?
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    Lol Ebanezer, what a funny name. It's so reminiscent of Charles Dickens.
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    (Original post by mrsmann)
    For god's sake, stop saying "I can't believe no one did anything." YOU wouldn't have if you were in that position. You would be **** scared and extremely shocked. If you think you're so much of a hero then be a policeman. It's just stupid to say "omg I'm so disgusted at people that didn't do anything," if a 20 year old's that strong you wouldn't dare move.
    Yes but if a group of people had stepped up and told him to leave the guy alone, he might of stopped. A 20year old isn't going to take on the whole train. Yeah, you would be scared but I think that old man was a lot more scared.
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    I genuinely believe in karma and people who commit actions such as this deserve to - and will - suffer very painful consequences. This is one of the rare instances where I believe the death penalty should be used. People like him don't deserve to even breathe in the air on this planet.
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    There is actually something called as bystander effect, where the more people there are around, the less chance there is of anyone helping.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bystander_effect

    A common explanation of this phenomenon is that, with others present, observers all assume that someone else is going to intervene and so they each individually refrain from doing so. This is an example of how diffusion of responsibility leads to social loafing. People may also assume that other bystanders may be more qualified to help, such as being a doctor or police officer, and their intervention would thus be unneeded. People may also fear "losing face" in front of the other bystanders, being superseded by a "superior" helper, or offering unwanted assistance. Another explanation is that bystanders monitor the reactions of other people in an emergency situation to see if others think that it is necessary to intervene. Since others are doing exactly the same, everyone concludes from the inaction of others that other people do not think that help is needed. This is an example of pluralistic ignorance and social proof. An alternative to explanations of rational motivation is that emotional cues to action can be as powerful as rational ones, and the presence of a group of inactive others is a pre-rational emotional cue to inaction that must be overcome.

    To counter the bystander effect when you are the victim, a studied recommendation is to pick a specific person in the crowd to appeal to for help rather than appealing to the larger group generally. If you are the only person reacting to an emergency, point directly to a specific bystander and give them a specific task such as, "You. Call 911." These steps place all responsibility on a specific person instead of allowing it to diffuse. Furthermore, pluralistic ignorance is countered by the implication that all bystanders are indeed interested in helping, and social proof kicks in when one or more of the crowd steps in to assist.
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    (Original post by _jackofdiamonds)
    There is actually something called as bystander effect, where the more people there are around, the less chance there is of anyone helping.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bystander_effect
    Thanks - that was really interesting.
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    (Original post by mrsmann)
    For god's sake, stop saying "I can't believe no one did anything." YOU wouldn't have if you were in that position. You would be **** scared and extremely shocked. If you think you're so much of a hero then be a policeman. It's just stupid to say "omg I'm so disgusted at people that didn't do anything," if a 20 year old's that strong you wouldn't dare move.
    I agree...im sure everyone was scared out of their wits when this guy was being so violent...but liberton du nord is right....stupid idiot should be in mental hospital
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    heh, in this country if someone beat up someone i would have second thoughts of intervening... political correctness would in the end make me the criminal for helping out someone.
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    (Original post by Logan)
    heh, in this country if someone beat up someone i would have second thoughts of intervening... political correctness would in the end make me the criminal for helping out someone.
    Do you really believe that *******s?
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    (Original post by Libertin du Nord)
    Do you really believe that *******s?
    Yes.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/liv...n_page_id=1770

    Patrick Walsh, 56, awoke to find an intruder in his flat on Corkland Road in Chorlton-***-Hardy, south Manchester.

    Police say "following an exchange of words" the 43-year-old suspect fell from the fourth floor window on to the pavement below.

    ...

    Walsh was arrested on suspicion of causing serious bodily harm and bailed until November pending further police inquirers.
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    he threw him out of a window. the police usually let slide if you hit someone a little to hard when they break in but some things they have to come down upon. I dont agree but the laws the law
    UK law dictates that you can use force to a less than or equal degree than your attacker, so you can stab them in the stomach, providing they stabbed you first. At least so my gf says anyway.
    Also where most people are going to pull is that youve quoted the daily mail

    Oh and Logan i believe your statement is indicative of many people, it may as libitin suggests may not be true but there does seem to be an ever increasing number of people who believe it
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    (Original post by Cadre_Of_Storms)
    he threw him out of a window. the police usually let slide if you hit someone a little to hard when they break in but some things they have to come down upon.
    The reports yesterday were that nobody knew why the bloke supermaned out the window, what's the source?
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    Is no one else disgusted by these calls of "death penalty?" Yeah revenge really is a civilised method we should be proud of :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by mrsmann)
    Is no one else disgusted by these calls of "death penalty?" Yeah revenge really is a civilised method we should be proud of :rolleyes:
    Care to follow that up with your suggestion of an appropriate method of dealing with them?
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    (Original post by Cadre_Of_Storms)
    he threw him out of a window. the police usually let slide if you hit someone a little to hard when they break in but some things they have to come down upon. I dont agree but the laws the law
    UK law dictates that you can use force to a less than or equal degree than your attacker, so you can stab them in the stomach, providing they stabbed you first.
    Inaccurate. You can use any force which is 'reasonable' - if someone was pounding you repeatedly with their fists, it would be acceptable to pick up a blunt object and whack them on the head to make them stop. It would not then be permissible to pick them up and hurl them from your window...
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    (Original post by mrsmann)
    Is no one else disgusted by these calls of "death penalty?" Yeah revenge really is a civilised method we should be proud of :rolleyes:
    Is any ideal of justice really any better than revenge? Let's say I murder somebody when I'm 18 - I then regret it, develop as a person, get married and becoming quite a decent sort of chap who'd never dream of killing anybody - I change. Yet say fifteen or twenty years later, the police link me to the crime - they'd still arrest me, and the law would still dictate that I should receive a mandatory life sentence.

    I think a lot of very noble ideals are floated around, and I disagree with the death penalty in an objective way and as a restriction on the state, but I don't think it's all that morally repugnant. If the person beaten to within an inch of his life in this case had been a close relative of a friend of mine, I'm afraid I could not find any great reason to criticise if my friend then went on to kill said offender in a heated act of revenge.
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    (Original post by bunthulhu)
    Care to follow that up with your suggestion of an appropriate method of dealing with them?
    Battle Royale.
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    (Original post by _jackofdiamonds)
    Battle Royale.
    :rofl: Perhaps a little controversial...
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    (Original post by bunthulhu)
    :rofl: Perhaps a little controversial...
    Good viewing though, I'm thinking maybe a Big Brother meets Battle Royale scenario.
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    (Original post by bunthulhu)
    Care to follow that up with your suggestion of an appropriate method of dealing with them?
    The one we have know, prison.

    I think a lot of very noble ideals are floated around, and I disagree with the death penalty in an objective way and as a restriction on the state, but I don't think it's all that morally repugnant. If the person beaten to within an inch of his life in this case had been a close relative of a friend of mine, I'm afraid I could not find any great reason to criticise if my friend then went on to kill said offender in a heated act of revenge.
    That's why the law exists to stop personal emotions getting in the way. If I worked for 10 years and bought an incredibly expensive house and someone just put a bomb in it and I had no insurance I might feel like killing them, but that wouldn't be justified just because I'd felt angry at that moment.

    I just find it silly to condone revenge when the issue has absolutely nothing to do with anyone we know. You might see it differently if you were a victim but then you're not thinking rationally.
 
 
 
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