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    I am currently half way through an MSc in civil engineering. I have been doing the degree Part time, while working for a structural engineering firm.

    I have recently found out that you no longer need an MSc (or MEng) to become a chartered member of the IStructE.

    Because of this, my employer has offered me the opportunity to leave my course now, and get a significant pay rise. (From £26k, to £40k).

    My dimella...

    If I leave the course now, I may regret not getting a masters qualification. I am also in the position where my employer is paying my tuition fees, so I may never get the chance again.

    However, the course is not all that relevant to the work I am doing. In fact, this second year in particular will not be very useful for my job.

    Furthermore, if I go full time at work now, I will be a year closer to becoming chartered. Also, I will be able to gain much more experience and work on much larger projects if on a full tike schedule (whereas this was difficult when only working 3 days).

    On the other side, I enjoy having the uni days as its slightly more relaxing, albeit extremely difficult. - First lectures arent until 11am , so I also get a slight lie in!!

    I am not looking to move jobs or go abroad anytime in the next, say, 5-10 years - by which time I should be chartered. So, the MSc may not be all that relevant anyway.

    Apart from friends and colleagues, I have struggled to find input from anyone else in similar positions or those in senior engineering positions with views on BEng vs MSc vs CEng etc.

    Any input would be great, as I am finding this decision rather difficult to make!
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    (Original post by SGray115)
    I am currently half way through an MSc in civil engineering. I have been doing the degree Part time, while working for a structural engineering firm.

    I have recently found out that you no longer need an MSc (or MEng) to become a chartered member of the IStructE.

    Because of this, my employer has offered me the opportunity to leave my course now, and get a significant pay rise. (From £26k, to £40k).

    My dimella...

    If I leave the course now, I may regret not getting a masters qualification. I am also in the position where my employer is paying my tuition fees, so I may never get the chance again.

    However, the course is not all that relevant to the work I am doing. In fact, this second year in particular will not be very useful for my job.

    Furthermore, if I go full time at work now, I will be a year closer to becoming chartered. Also, I will be able to gain much more experience and work on much larger projects if on a full tike schedule (whereas this was difficult when only working 3 days).

    On the other side, I enjoy having the uni days as its slightly more relaxing, albeit extremely difficult. - First lectures arent until 11am , so I also get a slight lie in!!

    I am not looking to move jobs or go abroad anytime in the next, say, 5-10 years - by which time I should be chartered. So, the MSc may not be all that relevant anyway.

    Apart from friends and colleagues, I have struggled to find input from anyone else in similar positions or those in senior engineering positions with views on BEng vs MSc vs CEng etc.

    Any input would be great, as I am finding this decision rather difficult to make!
    Since you're halfway through the MSc course I would say just stick with it and finish it. It will only help you in future not hurt you.....besides you don't want to wake up one day and say I wish I did this.

    You will get the pay rise regardless and still work towards chartership so it's a good move in my opinion
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    (Original post by SGray115)
    I have recently found out that you no longer need an MSc (or MEng) to become a chartered member of the IStructE.
    That's not what it says here:

    https://www.istructe.org/membership/...red-membership
    "Candidates wishing to apply for Chartered Membership should hold an Institution accredited MEng degree (normally 4 years full time or the equivalent). Those holding a BEng (Hons) degree can also apply, but a period of Further Learning must also be demonstrated e.g. through an accredited MSc degree, via the Institution’s Technical Report Route or completion of the Institution's Chartered Membership Examination."
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    (Original post by jneill)
    That's not what it says here:

    https://www.istructe.org/membership/...red-membership
    "Candidates wishing to apply for Chartered Membership should hold an Institution accredited MEng degree (normally 4 years full time or the equivalent). Those holding a BEng (Hons) degree can also apply, but a period of Further Learning must also be demonstrated e.g. through an accredited MSc degree, via the Institution’s Technical Report Route or completion of the Institution's Chartered Membership Examination."
    He's right....this is a new development by the IStructE (someone working in the industry also told me about this) and IMechE are apparently considering something similar although unlikely for IMechE.

    Edit: Found the link, here it is:

    https://www.istructe.org/news-articl...eers-transform

    Edit 2: This is SO good....I wish IMechE would do this as well. Then again we don't have rigorous exams of professional competence like structural engineers do..so I don't think they will do this for mechanical engineers

    Smack did you know this?
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    (Original post by a10)
    He's right....this is a new development by the IStructE (someone working in the industry also told me about this) and IMechE are apparently considering something similar although unlikely for IMechE.

    Edit: Found the link, here it is:

    https://www.istructe.org/news-articl...eers-transform

    Edit 2: This is SO good....I wish IMechE would do this as well. Then again we don't have rigorous exams of professional competence like structural engineers do..so I don't think they will do this for mechanical engineers

    Smack did you know this?
    Interesting, but you still have to do an exam. Which you would need to study for.

    I'd have thought if you are already in a masters programme you would be best to complete it.

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    (Original post by jneill)
    Interesting, but you still have to do an exam. Which you would need to study for.

    I'd have thought if you are already in a degree programme you would be best to continue.

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    Yeah, he will still need to do an exam even if he completed the MSc which is why I think completing the MSc will give him a well rounded knowledge base coupled with his job experience rather than just relying on job experience alone which if he has been working for only few years will be hard to get.
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    (Original post by a10)
    He's right....this is a new development by the IStructE (someone working in the industry also told me about this) and IMechE are apparently considering something similar although unlikely for IMechE.

    Edit: Found the link, here it is:

    https://www.istructe.org/news-articl...eers-transform

    Edit 2: This is SO good....I wish IMechE would do this as well. Then again we don't have rigorous exams of professional competence like structural engineers do..so I don't think they will do this for mechanical engineers

    Smack did you know this?
    Wasn't aware of that until now, thanks for the heads up.

    Makes sense, though. The actual requirements for chartership are to demonstrate masters level knowledge, but this does not necessarily have to be through a masters degree. The IMechE told me as much when I was at one of their get chartered events recently. I believe this comes top down from the ECUK, and page 30 of the UK-SPEC also clearly demonstrates the viability of routes other than just formal education.

    What appears to be the case with the IStructE is that previously, in order to sit their exam, candidates already had to demonstrate masters level knowledge, whereas now they acknowledge that being able to pass their exam demonstrates masters level knowledge. Which is fair enough - their exam is notoriously difficult (I hear it has something like a 33% pass rate), and widely acknowledged to be above masters level.

    And, yes, you can get chartered via the IMechE without a masters degree, although as they don't have an exam like the IStructE, you would need another way of demonstrating masters level knowledge. I think this is usually done via a technical report, if you are not prepared to undertake further academic learning. It would not be viable for the IMechE to utilise an exam like the IStructE anyway.

    Formal academic study will probably still be necessary for many, though, as not everyone has jobs that allow them to demonstrate masters level knowledge.
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    (Original post by Smack)
    Wasn't aware of that until now, thanks for the heads up.
    The IMechE told me as much when I was at one of their get chartered events recently. I believe this comes top down from the ECUK, and page 30 of the UK-SPEC also clearly demonstrates the viability of routes other than just formal education.
    No prob

    Thanks for the link, it was a good read. How do you know about the events by the way? Do IMechE send emails about them?


    (Original post by Smack)
    Formal academic study will probably still be necessary for many, though, as not everyone has jobs that allow them to demonstrate masters level knowledge.
    Yeah this is a very good point...my year 3 project supervisor also told me this and I ended up swapping back to the MEng course. May as well finish the extra year now and forever.
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    (Original post by a10)
    No prob

    Thanks for the link, it was a good read. How do you know about the events by the way? Do IMechE send emails about them?
    Go to IMechE Near You:

    http://nearyou.imeche.org/

    Select your region, and there will hopefully be events nearby. You should be able to narrow down to your local area - e.g. if I select the Scottish region, I can select various "areas", like Aberdeen, Glasgow and the like.

    IMechE also send emails, but you may have your settings set such that emails are turned off, or they may go to your spam, or you may not be signed up for them etc.
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    (Original post by Smack)
    Go to IMechE Near You:

    http://nearyou.imeche.org/

    Select your region, and there will hopefully be events nearby. You should be able to narrow down to your local area - e.g. if I select the Scottish region, I can select various "areas", like Aberdeen, Glasgow and the like.

    IMechE also send emails, but you may have your settings set such that emails are turned off, or they may go to your spam, or you may not be signed up for them etc.
    Wouldn't let me rep! Thanks
 
 
 
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