Economics with mediocre maths skills?

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    My maths is mediocre. Achieved a B at GCSE, good with numbers, hate shapes/graphs and all the complicated bits. However, Economics looks like a very interesting subject, could I do well in it without good maths skills?
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    (Original post by Mvpmb)
    My maths is mediocre. Achieved a B at GCSE, good with numbers, hate shapes/graphs and all the complicated bits. However, Economics looks like a very interesting subject, could I do well in it without good maths skills?
    You need maths a-level for almost every economics (bsc) degree. The reality is that there is no such thing as economics without maths because you need to apply maths to understand economics

    maybe take A-level maths?
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    (Original post by samantham999)
    You need maths a-level for almost every economics (bsc) degree. The reality is that there is no such thing as economics without maths because you need to apply maths to understand economics

    maybe take A-level maths?

    Not true. Many top universities(Exeter, Lougboroough, Lancaster) offer economics without A level maths. I understand I have to do Maths, im just asking do you need to be GOOD at maths to do economics. Im really good at essays/arguements/research etc. and I could probably tolerate maths. Im just curious if you have to be super competent in maths to stand a chance on the degree
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    (Original post by Mvpmb)
    Not true. Many top universities(Exeter, Lougboroough, Lancaster) offer economics without maths. I understand I have to do Maths, im just asking do you need to be GOOD at maths to do economics. Im really good at essays/arguements/research etc. and I could probably tolerate maths. Im just curious if you have to be super competent in maths to stand a chance on the degree

    Thats subjective. They are good unis but if you want to go into banking you have to go to target unis such UCL/LSE/OXBRIDGE/IMPERIAL/WARWICK

    Additionally, you could do a BA in economics, this will have less maths and way more essays
    those unis you have stated are more essay based economics not maths because you need maths a level to understand economics at most unis
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    (Original post by samantham999)
    Thats subjective. They are good unis but if you want to go into banking you have to go to target unis such UCL/LSE/OXBRIDGE/IMPERIAL/WARWICK

    Additionally, you could do a BA in economics, this will have less maths and way more essays
    those unis you have stated are more essay based economics not maths because you need maths a level to understand economics at most unis
    Not really interested in banking at the moment personally so thats not an issue. My sister went to bristol and did spanish and she got into banking comfortably though, so I wouldn't stress uni name to much. Could Always try for one of them post grad if i change my mind. Do you study economics?
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    I do not believe you have to be super competent (otherwise they would specify A-Levels maths) and am pretty sure your degree will include a module on maths (statistics) in the first year so you are competent mathematically to complete the degree.

    I absolutely abhorred maths but did a stats module and came out with 93%. So far with my economics modules, the maths has consisted of brackets, square roots, a bit of algebra (substitution); all of which is very do-able with practice.

    hamza ahmad luton 786 hertfordshire hamzaahmad786
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    (Original post by Mvpmb)
    Not really interested in banking at the moment personally so thats not an issue. My sister went to bristol and did spanish and she got into banking comfortably though, so I wouldn't stress uni name to much. Could Always try for one of them post grad if i change my mind. Do you study economics?
    bristol is a semi-target uni
    its very difficult for people to into top banks without going to target unis
    yeah i guess so, I think you should stick with BA economics as you said you love essays
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    (Original post by samantham999)
    bristol is a target uni
    its very difficult for people to into top banks without going to target unis
    yeah i guess so, I think you should stick with BA economics as you said you love essays
    How does Exeter fair in the banking world? Its smashing the league tables now days but its reputation is fairly new. I only ask because I can go there without A level maths
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    (Original post by Mvpmb)
    How does Exeter fair in the banking world? Its smashing the league tables now days but its reputation is fairly new. I only ask because I can go there without A level maths
    its not a target uni (target unis are UCL/LSE/OXBRIDGE/IMPERIAL/WARWICK)

    semi target: KCL, durham, bristol, cass and some others not sure
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    (Original post by samantham999)
    its not a target uni (target unis are UCL/LSE/OXBRIDGE/IMPERIAL/WARWICK)

    semi target: KCL, durham, bristol, cass and some others not sure
    My dilemma is that I am very confident I can get a first in a Politics and IR degree, however, I believe a quantitative subject like economics opens more doors. Cant decide whether the career prospects opened by economics justify a more difficult degree?
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    (Original post by Mvpmb)
    My dilemma is that I am very confident I can get a first in a Politics and IR degree, however, I believe a quantitative subject like economics opens more doors. Cant decide whether the career prospects opened by economics justify a more difficult degree?
    politics & ir at which uni?
    economics opens a lot of doors because its analytical and employers like to see it.
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    (Original post by samantham999)
    politics & ir at which uni?
    economics opens a lot of doors because its analytical and employers like to see it.
    At York

    I got 100% accross all my AS/A2 for politics and worked with Zac Goldmsith during his london mayor campagn. So obviously its my natural subject, most people are telling me just to stick to it and not risk the jump to something like economics. I failed my chemistry A level(D), not sure if thats representative of by ability to do economics, however, it does show my academic skill set is more niche than diverse
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    (Original post by Mvpmb)
    At York

    I got 100% accross all my AS/A2 for politics and worked with Zac Goldmsith during his london mayor campagn. So obviously its my natural subject, most people are telling me just to stick to it and not risk the jump to something like economics. I failed my chemistry A level(D), not sure if thats representative of by ability to do economics, however, it does show my academic skill set is more niche than diverse
    Chemistry doesn't have anything to do with economics, even though I get what you mean because it is somewhat analytical

    How about you stick with politics & IR - maybe apply to lse? and then do a masters in economics or something finance related and that will still open a lot of doors
    the fact that you worked with zac goldsmith is impressive and will make your politics & ir shine with passion
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    (Original post by samantham999)
    Chemistry doesn't have anything to do with economics, even though I get what you mean because it is somewhat analytical

    How about you stick with politics & IR - maybe apply to lse? and then do a masters in economics or something finance related and that will still open a lot of doors
    the fact that you worked with zac goldsmith is impressive and will make your politics & ir shine with passion
    I'm thinking of flexible honours at Exeter
    It allows you to choose the proporiton of each subject you study and drop/swap out your subjects between years

    This way I can minimise my economics work load if i don't like it

    LSE will probably scoff me off given my D in chemistry, I'd have to take a new A level to apply for anywhere else, infact getting into York was a bit of a miracle in itself(had to blag a lot)
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    To the OP: B in GCSE Maths is a good grade and you can be proud of your achievement. The top 10 BSc Econ courses require A or even A* in A level maths. But there are some Russell Group and mid tier unis where you can get admitted with a B or even C in maths. A few don't require A level maths. Maths is an analytical tool that support problem solving, forecasting and proof of modelling.

    Econ maths is relatively intermediate compared to maths in STEM subjects. My friends in engineering laugh at my maths assignments. If you prefer a discursive rather maths based curriculum in econ, there are less quant heavy BA Econ courses (Liverpool, SOAS).
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    Agree ^ the maths in economics at ucl/lse/oxbridge is high apparently but other unis theres less of it
 
 
 
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