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    Earlier today in another thread I read that the Institution of Structural Engineers (IStructE) is going to allow candidates to sit their Chartered Membership Exam without either having a masters level degree, or completed the technical report, providing they have a BEng(Hons) degree. Based on this, one could make a reasonable argument that, for those wishing to become structural engineers, beyond individual company qualification requirements, there is no reason to pursue a masters level qualification, as bachelors candidates are allowed to sit the chartership exam without any extra obstacles. The IStructE believe that if one can pass their exam (and it is renowned to be very difficult (example - Jan 2016 past paper), with a very low pass rate, that clearly demonstrates masters level knowledge.

    Ultimately, chartership is governed by the Engineering Council UK (ECUK), and the details can be found in the UK Standard for Professional Engineering Competency (UK-SPEC), with the individual institutions administering the process for their respective disciplines, so the exact process varies a little between institution (as far as I am aware, it's only the IStructE that has an exam, for example).

    A masters level qualification is not a requirement for chartership. Page 30 of the UK-SPEC states that:

    "Applicants who do not have exemplifying qualifications may demonstrate the required knowledge and understanding in other ways, but must clearly demonstrate they have achieved the same level of knowledge and understanding as those with exemplifying qualifications." (Exemplifying qualifications are accredited degrees/modules.)

    Although you certainly could be forgiven for thinking that you need a masters for chartership. I used to think that, too.

    But, given this, would you still do an MEng/MSc if you knew you could become chartered without it? Certainly, given many will be facing £9,000 fees and a possible year of lost earnings, it's food for thought.

    Although a possible obstacle may be that not everyone will have positions that allow them to demonstrate masters level knowledge, and there is no signs of the bar being lowered. If you already have a suitable masters degree, there is no question about being able to demonstrate that you can meet this requirement.
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    I'm not studying structural engineering, but I would still do an MSc after my BEng even with the possibility of getting a chartership without because I'm interested in further study/research
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    I don't do structural either, I do chem eng, and I would still do an MSc because quite a few grad roles require a Masters level degree
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    (Original post by Eternalflames)
    I'm not studying structural engineering, but I would still do an MSc after my BEng even with the possibility of getting a chartership without because I'm interested in further study/research
    This applies to all engineering disciplines, not just structural.

    (Original post by DoodleDee)
    I don't do structural either, I do chem eng, and I would still do an MSc because quite a few grad roles require a Masters level degree
    Job prospects are certainly a good reason to complete further study. (One of the main reasons I did my MEng, actually.)

    However, one of the reasons that the MEng (and MSc) offers generally enhanced prospects are because of chartership. What about if the company would support you to complete the technical report with a bachelors?
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    I think it would come down to how long it would take you to gain the required experience to even write up the technical report. It might take you longer to achieve the same goal (CEng) therefore this would somewhat halt your career progression for a little period of time.


    If it took the same amount of time to gain the required experience as it is to do an MSc then work towards chartership (in 3-4 years) then a lot of people would avoid the MSc/MEng route. Although to my understanding this is not the case so personally i would still do the MEng/MSc for these reasons.
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    (Original post by a10)
    I think it would come down to how long it would take you to gain the required experience to even write up the technical report. It might take you longer to achieve the same goal (CEng) therefore this would somewhat halt your career progression for a little period of time.


    If it took the same amount of time to gain the required experience as it is to do an MSc then work towards chartership (in 3-4 years) then a lot of people would avoid the MSc/MEng route. Although to my understanding this is not the case so personally i would still do the MEng/MSc for these reasons.
    That's a good point. Although I haven't seen much info about the technical report, I think it may take a bit longer. Provided that you are doing suitable work. Although this also applies to the MEng/MSc route, too.
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    At my uni yes because the content you do on the MEng is a lot more interesting than the BEng as a result of not having the 3rd year dissertation and certain modules being able to be pushed back to 4th year.
 
 
 
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