Join TSR now and get all your revision questions answeredSign up now

Maths GCSE Question

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I was doing a past paper question and found this I've gotten part of the way through looked at the mark scheme and tried but failed to work it out. Hopefully someone can help me understand how to do this. The question is to solve:
    3 - 4
    ------ -------
    X-1 X+2

    I got to

    3x+6-4x+4
    --------------
    X^2+X-2

    Help is greatly appreciated many thanks .
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    i got 2-x all over (x-1) (x+2) but i have a feeling i am wrong
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Snowystar)
    I was doing a past paper question and found this I've gotten part of the way through looked at the mark scheme and tried but failed to work it out. Hopefully someone can help me understand how to do this. The question is to solve:
    3 - 4
    ------ -------
    X-1 X+2

    I got to

    3x+6-4x+4
    --------------
    X^2+X-2

    Help is greatly appreciated many thanks .
    You can't solve it unless it is equal to something. In terms of the numerator, you can simplify that by collecting the like terms...
    The denominator is fine, although you should leave it in its factorised form.



    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Chittesh14)
    You can't solve it unless it is equal to something. In terms of the numerator, you can simplify that by collecting the like terms...
    The denominator is fine, although you should leave it in its factorised form.



    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Oh whoops it's equal to 2.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Snowystar)
    Oh whoops it's equal to 2.
    So, if the numerator is equal to -X + 10. The denominator is (X-1)(X+2).

    -X + 10
    -------------- = 2
    (X-1)(X+2)

    So, to get rid of the denominator and equate two equations in X, what do you have to do next?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Chittesh14)
    So, if the numerator is equal to -X + 10. The denominator is (X-1)(X+2).

    -X + 10
    -------------- = 2
    (X-1)(X+2)

    So, to get rid of the denominator and equate two equations in X, what do you have to do next?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    No clue
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Snowystar)
    No clue
    Multiply the denominator by 2 to get rid off it. Now, it's on the right hand side.
    -X + 10 = 2[(X-1)(X+2)]


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Chittesh14)
    Multiply the denominator by 2 to get rid off it. Now, it's on the right hand side.
    -X + 10 = 2[(X-1)(X+2)]


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Thanks so much I finally got the answer
    X=-7/2 or X=2
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Snowystar)
    Thanks so much I finally got the answer
    X=-7/2 or X=2
    No problem . Keep posting if you need more help.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
 
 
 
Poll
Which party will you be voting for in the General Election 2017?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Quick reply
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.