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The$W£D£
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When do we move in?
When is freshers?
When is the start of lectures?

Thanks!
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tuppatopbrer
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#2
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1) www.imperial.ac.uk
2) www.imperial.ac.uk
3) During "freshers". But it depends on your subject.

To be honest, the answers to your questions aren't urgent. You will be given this information well within the next month.

Though... take note. If you do computing you dont have a freshers week. Unless you count being assigned and having to complete your first assignment by the end of freshers week as fun.
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fonzievision
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#3
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God.. computing guys have it tough. Not going to be entertaining sharin an adjacent building with them...
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tuppatopbrer
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Dont ever ever ever go into Huxley if you can help it, unless you want to use their nice showers or your tutorials are there. God help you if u are in the Huxley Mezzanine, that place is a frigging maze.

NB, On a computing not Fonzie (or all other Physics heads), brush (look) up on C++ if u can. If Computing is ur 1st lab session out of the 3 its not helpful or fun looking at a computing script still hung over.
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Alexthepenguin
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#5
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http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/studentha...m/datesofterm/
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D.Hilbert
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#6
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(Original post by tuppatopbrer)
Dont ever ever ever go into Huxley if you can help it, unless you want to use their nice showers or your tutorials are there. God help you if u are in the Huxley Mezzanine, that place is a frigging maze.
NB, On a computing not Fonzie (or all other Physics heads), brush (look) up on C++ if u can. If Computing is ur 1st lab session out of the 3 its not helpful or fun looking at a computing script still hung over.
Sounds bad. Is it uggly too? god, why couldn't they have the maths depart. in a better building :p:

OP:
1. sept. 29
2. oct. 1 - oct. 7 (I'm guessing)
3. oct. 8

2 and 3 for maths anyway...
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Alexthepenguin
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#7
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actually i have no idea when the first lecture will be lol
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Mehh
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#8
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(Original post by tuppatopbrer)
Dont ever ever ever go into Huxley if you can help it, unless you want to use their nice showers
There are showers there?!
Now you tell me after a whole year of cycling into the uni from Camden....
Not so much a pain for me, twas the others I feel sorry for...:p:
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Gimperial
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(Original post by tuppatopbrer)
1)
Though... take note. If you do computing you dont have a freshers week. Unless you count being assigned and having to complete your first assignment by the end of freshers week as fun.
No freshers week !?!?!?!?

How hard is the first assignment? Surely we should be able to complete it in 20 minutes if we have previous programming experience. It would really blow not having freshers
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s.e.r.e.n.e
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#10
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I read that for Maths people we are going to have a diagnostic test (on all the A-level topics, Maths + Further Maths) in the first lecture on 1st October!! Is that true?

If you/I don't do too well will I be called to have a cup of tea with my tutor?
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xaxa
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#11
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Computing - yes, the first assignment is easy. My first assignment (due on the Monday of the 2nd week) said this:
"The objectives of this first exercise are to gain some familiarity with the Linux operating system, the screen editor nedit [...] you will be working in the Linux programing environment using the nedit editor for much of the first year.
Although this exercise is not assessed, you should still submit it."

It's easy if you've done programming before, if not, find a friend in the lab if you have any trouble. It's pretty straightforward.

If you want to prepare in some way, the most useful thing you can do is download and install GNU/Linux on your PC. When they say "You will be working in the Linux programing environment using the nedit editor for much of the first year" they really mean "most of the course, unless you're really stubborn and make things awkward for yourself".
Install GNU/Linux and figure out how to do things with the command line, it turns out to be really useful. If you know basic things like copying/moving files, editing them, and what else you can do and how to find out how to do it (i.e. how to use the command-line manual in Linux) then when you need to do something you can concentrate on the programming problem instead of not being able to fully use your OS.

Things people ask me quite often:
"How do I copy files and stuff?"
cp source destination
mv source destination
rm delete-this
man command-name
reads the manual, which is usually just a page or so of options for a particular command, and examples of how to use it. It's probably the most useful thing to know, if you know what the program you need to use is then it's quicker than Googling for something.
"How do I see where all my disk space is being used?"
du -ms * | sort -n
"Argh! How do I cancel that print job?"
lpq -Pprintername [shows print queue]
lprm -Pprintername jobnumber [from lpq]
lprm -Pprintername username [deletes all your print jobs]
"How do I copy a file from Linux at home to DoC?"
scp filename [email protected]:
or a directory
scp -r directory [email protected]:
"and the other way round?"
scp -r [email protected]ath/to/fileOrDirectory .
"How do I edit a file without using a GUI?"
nano filename
"How can I access a DoC computer remotely from Linux?"
ssh [email protected]
"How do I print a text file from the command line?"
enscript -Pprintername filename
"How do I change my password?"
passwd
"How do I print a pdf, 4 pages-to-one, on the command line?"
pdf2ps file.pdf
psnup -4 file.ps > file-4.ps
lpr -Pprintername file-4.ps
"I can't find the file called X!"
find ~ -iname X
or
find ~ -iname '*X*'
"I can't remember what it's called. But it has the word "linux" in it."
grep -R linux ~
(~ means your home directory)

I could go on, but you get the idea


Maths -- there was a test at some point in the first week, I think I got full marks, or almost full marks. They people that didn't do very well had extra help. I think they also use it to see what you've been taught (as in "damn, yet another thing they must have taken off the A-level syllabus).

Edit: oh... link needed! Computing will be using KUbuntu Linux from next term (so I've heard). It doesn't really matter what you choose, the only difference between KUbuntu, Mandriva, Fedora, Debian, Slackware, Red Hat, SuSE, etc is how you automatically install supported software (which on Linux is loads of stuff since it's often free), what software is supported/available, and the default wallpaper when you first log in.
I usually recommend KUbuntu or Ubuntu anyway though: http://www.kubuntu.com/download.php#latest (download with Bittorrent if you can, since that verifies the file as it downloads).
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tuppatopbrer
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#12
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Physics: you'll get a diagnostic test after your week of "foundation maths". Its ridiculously easy. Still 16 people failed last year to my surprise. If you fail, the new Bob will speak to you and generally ask if you have taken a gap year. Dont fail the test. You will have more lectures (or classworks) under the heading of extra maths. You will then have a second chance of the test in January or the 2nd term. And if that is failed again, I think they politely tell you that your £3000 is not enough money to teach you the laws of logs. (aka **** off)
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tuppatopbrer
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#13
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#13
(Original post by Mehh)
There are showers there?!
Now you tell me after a whole year of cycling into the uni from Camden....
Not so much a pain for me, twas the others I feel sorry for...:p:
Yes, a phD student told me. He also said keep it quiet.
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Gimperial
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#14
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#14
(Original post by xaxa)
Computing - yes, the first assignment is easy. My first assignment (due on the Monday of the 2nd week) said this:
"The objectives of this first exercise are to gain some familiarity with the Linux operating system, the screen editor nedit [...] you will be working in the Linux programing environment using the nedit editor for much of the first year.
Although this exercise is not assessed, you should still submit it."

It's easy if you've done programming before, if not, find a friend in the lab if you have any trouble. It's pretty straightforward.

If you want to prepare in some way, the most useful thing you can do is download and install GNU/Linux on your PC. When they say "You will be working in the Linux programing environment using the nedit editor for much of the first year" they really mean "most of the course, unless you're really stubborn and make things awkward for yourself".
Install GNU/Linux and figure out how to do things with the command line, it turns out to be really useful. If you know basic things like copying/moving files, editing them, and what else you can do and how to find out how to do it (i.e. how to use the command-line manual in Linux) then when you need to do something you can concentrate on the programming problem instead of not being able to fully use your OS.

Things people ask me quite often:
"How do I copy files and stuff?"
cp source destination
mv source destination
rm delete-this
man command-name
reads the manual, which is usually just a page or so of options for a particular command, and examples of how to use it. It's probably the most useful thing to know, if you know what the program you need to use is then it's quicker than Googling for something.
"How do I see where all my disk space is being used?"
du -ms * | sort -n
"Argh! How do I cancel that print job?"
lpq -Pprintername [shows print queue]
lprm -Pprintername jobnumber [from lpq]
lprm -Pprintername username [deletes all your print jobs]
"How do I copy a file from Linux at home to DoC?"
scp filename [email protected]:
or a directory
scp -r directory [email protected]:
"and the other way round?"
scp -r [email protected]ath/to/fileOrDirectory .
"How do I edit a file without using a GUI?"
nano filename
"How can I access a DoC computer remotely from Linux?"
ssh [email protected]
"How do I print a text file from the command line?"
enscript -Pprintername filename
"How do I change my password?"
passwd
"How do I print a pdf, 4 pages-to-one, on the command line?"
pdf2ps file.pdf
psnup -4 file.ps > file-4.ps
lpr -Pprintername file-4.ps
"I can't find the file called X!"
find ~ -iname X
or
find ~ -iname '*X*'
"I can't remember what it's called. But it has the word "linux" in it."
grep -R linux ~
(~ means your home directory)

I could go on, but you get the idea


Maths -- there was a test at some point in the first week, I think I got full marks, or almost full marks. They people that didn't do very well had extra help. I think they also use it to see what you've been taught (as in "damn, yet another thing they must have taken off the A-level syllabus).

Edit: oh... link needed! Computing will be using KUbuntu Linux from next term (so I've heard). It doesn't really matter what you choose, the only difference between KUbuntu, Mandriva, Fedora, Debian, Slackware, Red Hat, SuSE, etc is how you automatically install supported software (which on Linux is loads of stuff since it's often free), what software is supported/available, and the default wallpaper when you first log in.
I usually recommend KUbuntu or Ubuntu anyway though: http://www.kubuntu.com/download.php#latest (download with Bittorrent if you can, since that verifies the file as it downloads).
Why on earth would you use command line when there is GNOME / KDE. Yes its useful sometimes, but I wouldnt use it very much.
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Mehh
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#15
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#15
(Original post by wais)
Why on earth would you use command line when there is GNOME / KDE. Yes its useful sometimes, but I wouldnt use it very much.
Because some people have to remotely manage computers with stuff like ssh. Using KDE in such a situation is not benefitial...
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xaxa
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#16
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#16
(Original post by wais)
Why on earth would you use command line when there is GNOME / KDE. Yes its useful sometimes, but I wouldnt use it very much.
Find all the java source files (my current project has several hundred) with "SOME_CONSTANT = "old value"".
KDE/Gnome: K menu, Find Files, "Browse" to the folder, Contents tab, type "old value" into box, Find, scroll through results (this is the first time I've used that...)
Command line:
grep "old value" *.java
or maybe
grep -R "old value" .
5 or 6 seconds? Depending how fast I'm typing.

Hmm... now I need to see the matching line after and the matching line before (i.e. the lines surrounding the lines with "old value" on them). I can't do that with the GUI unless I open up every file.
grep "old value" *.java -A1 -B1
(which is quick to type, as pressing the up arrow brings up the previous command.)

Delete all the *.class files in a folder with lots of other files too:
GUI, on Windows: click them all, maybe do sort by type first; press delete
KDE: same, or Edit menu -> Selection -> Select, type *.class, if you know you can do that
Command: rm *.class

Make a string of new directories
GUI: Right click or File -> New -> Directory -> Type name -> OK -> Open directory -> Repeat.
Command: mkdir -p string/of/directories

Resize all my holiday photos, keeping the originals. Rename them from 'dsc000NN.jpg' to '2007 06 Festival NN.jpg', and compress into a zip file to email.
GUI: Open some graphics program, work out how to do the batch processing, resize them. Or do each one individually. Or find some shareware software that will do it, or maybe the crappy stuff that came with the camera will do it, or just give up.
Select the files (hopefully they're in a separate folder so this is easy?) and Right click -> add to zip. Renaming them was too much effort, you'd probably want a free/shareware program to do it.
CLI:
mkdir smaller
for p in *.jpg; do convert $p -resize 40% smaller/$p; done
rename 'dsc00' '2007 06 Festival ' smaller/*
zip photos.zip smaller/*
(Or do the renaming in one: for p in *.jpg; do convert $p -resize 800 "2007 Festival ${i##[0-9]*}"; done -- but that's pretty advanced and not worth the effort in this case)

Email me when my slow-running simulation finishes
./long-running-simulation; mail [email protected] -s finished < /dev/null

Shut down the computer in 15 minutes:
shutdown -h 15

And I haven't even used pipes yet! (Where the output of one command becomes the input of another).
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Gimperial
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#17
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#17
(Original post by xaxa)
Find all the java source files (my current project has several hundred) with "SOME_CONSTANT = "old value"".
KDE/Gnome: K menu, Find Files, "Browse" to the folder, Contents tab, type "old value" into box, Find, scroll through results (this is the first time I've used that...)
Command line:
grep "old value" *.java
or maybe
grep -R "old value" .
5 or 6 seconds? Depending how fast I'm typing.

Hmm... now I need to see the matching line after and the matching line before (i.e. the lines surrounding the lines with "old value" on them). I can't do that with the GUI unless I open up every file.
grep "old value" *.java -A1 -B1
(which is quick to type, as pressing the up arrow brings up the previous command.)

Delete all the *.class files in a folder with lots of other files too:
GUI, on Windows: click them all, maybe do sort by type first; press delete
KDE: same, or Edit menu -> Selection -> Select, type *.class, if you know you can do that
Command: rm *.class

Make a string of new directories
GUI: Right click or File -> New -> Directory -> Type name -> OK -> Open directory -> Repeat.
Command: mkdir -p string/of/directories

Resize all my holiday photos, keeping the originals. Rename them from 'dsc000NN.jpg' to '2007 06 Festival NN.jpg', and compress into a zip file to email.
GUI: Open some graphics program, work out how to do the batch processing, resize them. Or do each one individually. Or find some shareware software that will do it, or maybe the crappy stuff that came with the camera will do it, or just give up.
Select the files (hopefully they're in a separate folder so this is easy?) and Right click -> add to zip. Renaming them was too much effort, you'd probably want a free/shareware program to do it.
CLI:
mkdir smaller
for p in *.jpg; do convert $p -resize 40% smaller/$p; done
rename 'dsc00' '2007 06 Festival ' smaller/*
zip photos.zip smaller/*
(Or do the renaming in one: for p in *.jpg; do convert $p -resize 800 "2007 Festival ${i##[0-9]*}"; done -- but that's pretty advanced and not worth the effort in this case)

Email me when my slow-running simulation finishes
./long-running-simulation; mail [email protected] -s finished < /dev/null

Shut down the computer in 15 minutes:
shutdown -h 15

And I haven't even used pipes yet! (Where the output of one command becomes the input of another).
Haha right, I get your point. Still its a bit of a chore having to learn a lot of commands in linux, undoubtedly at first I'd find it 2x faster to use the GUI.
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tahngarth
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#18
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#18
Maths: Don't worry about the diagnostic test it s not worth anything and even if you get bad results it wont mean anything it doesnt mean you're crap, especially if you're an international student your syllabus probably was totally different anyway . ( i was so rusty i forgot to add the constants when integrating , I got no points for the whole question (lol) ..)

Computing : yeah you do get a few things to do during freshers week but it really is nothing at all , don't let it spoil your week .... you don't even have to do it ... it s not assessed and it wont help you at all....
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xaxa
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#19
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#19
(Original post by wais)
Haha right, I get your point. Still its a bit of a chore having to learn a lot of commands in linux, undoubtedly at first I'd find it 2x faster to use the GUI.
It's an investment, like loads of things. It doesn't seem to pay off immediately, but a couple of months later you realise how useful it is. (In my case, when I use a Windows machine.)

The other useful thing is learning to touch-type (less useful than the command line or having Linux installed). I learnt to touch-type in the summer after 1st year, but not with a qwerty layout, my keyboard goes "aoeui dhtns" across the middle -- much better! (more words at your fingertips...). See http://www.dvzine.org/zine/01-toc.html if you're interested. Everyone I know who's used this layout hasn't looked back (admittedly, that's about 5 people, but not many people can touch type anyway).
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Gimperial
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#20
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(Original post by xaxa)
It's an investment, like loads of things. It doesn't seem to pay off immediately, but a couple of months later you realise how useful it is. (In my case, when I use a Windows machine.)

The other useful thing is learning to touch-type (less useful than the command line or having Linux installed). I learnt to touch-type in the summer after 1st year, but not with a qwerty layout, my keyboard goes "aoeui dhtns" across the middle -- much better! (more words at your fingertips...). See http://www.dvzine.org/zine/01-toc.html if you're interested. Everyone I know who's used this layout hasn't looked back (admittedly, that's about 5 people, but not many people can touch type anyway).
Really? I'd expect that most people in computing could touch type! Anyway, good that you turned to dvorak, I hear its much much more efficient than qwerty.
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