Should I study Biology or Psychology at university?

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    So, I have no idea what I want to do as a career. I have been wanting to study Law but after writing my first draft of my personal statement and sitting in court, I've realised that I'm not as interested as I thought in the subject. So, these are my other choices. I really enjoy both subjects equally if I'm honest, but I don't know what would lead to better career prospects?
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    (Original post by AndrewKn0x)
    So, I have no idea what I want to do as a career. I have been wanting to study Law but after writing my first draft of my personal statement and sitting in court, I've realised that I'm not as interested as I thought in the subject. So, these are my other choices. I really enjoy both subjects equally if I'm honest, but I don't know what would lead to better career prospects?
    Do you have any idea what you want to do after University? What interests you the most?
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    There are so many other courses within those fields too. Work out what grades you're likely to get and crack open a university perspectus within that grade range However, out of those two I'd suggest Biology only because there's soooo many people getting Psychology degrees.
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    (Original post by Kvothe the Arcane)
    Do you have any idea what you want to do after University? What interests you the most?
    I have no idea what I want to do after university, hence why I'm also considering a Law degree because I know it's well respected. All I know is I love nature programmes and the behavioural and biological study of animals in particular. I feel like through A-Level and even GCSE we've studied a little bit of ecology and quite a lot of human biology, but literally nothing of zoology and I'd love to learn about that. Psychology is just so interesting to me!
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    (Original post by bellalalaxo)
    There are so many other courses within those fields too. Work out what grades you're likely to get and crack open a university perspectus within that grade range However, out of those two I'd suggest Biology only because there's soooo many people getting Psychology degrees.
    That's the problem with Psychology degrees I think - they're literally everywhere! I'm leaning towards biology because of this really. I think I know where I'm at in terms of grades so I'm aiming for Russell Group universities really.
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    Do Biology. It gives you so many options and you develop a lot of skills. Some unis do offer animal behaviour-orientated degrees. And don't forget that some unis rank highly for Biology but aren't Russell Group - one example is Plymouth, it ranks very highly for marine biology and asks for very high grades (Some unis are actually of Russell Group standard but refuse to join the Group.). If you're more interested in evolution, animal behaviour, animal anatomy and taxonomy you may need to consider Zoology. Zoology still goes into biology but a Biology degree focuses on biological processes - Zoology doesn't.
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    I have the same problem too and it's stressing me out so much. Do you mind studying for a long time because for psychology you have to do undergraduate to get a job whereas Biology isn't as strict about that. Most biology jobs are heavy in research so do you like doing experiments/practicals and doing reports. Psychology is focused on research as well but you can do counselling etc not just limited to research.
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    I had the same problem too, ended up picking Psychology because I figured there would be elements of Biology within Psychology (i.e. neuroscience, psychological drugs, etc) but I ended up switching into Biology after a year.

    My experience of Psychology was it just wasn't interesting to me. Yeah, documentaries about criminal psychology are interesting, but they're a very small component of your degree. The British Psychological Society (BPS) requires Psych degrees to have breadth as well as depth. So you'll be covering a lot of different things, from how to learn, how children develop, sport psychology, memory processes, etc (have a look at uni's lists of modules on offer). Additionally, the studies, to me, are quite basic e.g. a study showed children would copy an adult displaying aggression. It's kind of obvious through just making observations as you go about life and I don't think it warrants a proper, clinical study to prove something so simplistic.

    Neuroscience was my favourite part, but I noticed all my Neuroscince lecturers weren't even from a Psychology-background, and instead had gone Biology/Biomed type degrees. So I decided to switch into Biology.

    My experience with Biology has been positive. Mainly due to my uni giving a really large selection of modules so you can really tailor your degree (I keep away from all the plant biology modules, for example). Again, check the lists of modules on the uni's websites. Biology has a lot more contact hours (20-25hrs per week for me at the moment) compared to Psychology (around 7hrs per week). Again, this will vary uni-to-uni so contact head of admissions if you want more details about workloads and timetables. Biology has a heavier workload, too. Biology is roughly 70% exam and 30% coursework (essays, lab reports, online tests) whilst Psychology was 100% exams in first year. Biology is a lot more difficult and requires a lot more effort, but you get more contact hours in lectures and labs which aid understanding. You also have practicals every week which can be 2-4 hours long but are really interesting, you're using proper equipment and doing things like PCR that you will have only read about so far.

    So to summarise, Biology is a lot more difficult but, in my opinion, a lot more rewarding and interesting to study. If you like getting your teeth into complex pathways then Biology is for you. Psychology is easy to understand but requires a lot of rote memorisation of studies and findings.

    Quote me if you have any specific questions.
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    (Original post by LeaX)
    I had the same problem too, ended up picking Psychology because I figured there would be elements of Biology within Psychology (i.e. neuroscience, psychological drugs, etc) but I ended up switching into Biology after a year.

    My experience of Psychology was it just wasn't interesting to me. Yeah, documentaries about criminal psychology are interesting, but they're a very small component of your degree. The British Psychological Society (BPS) requires Psych degrees to have breadth as well as depth. So you'll be covering a lot of different things, from how to learn, how children develop, sport psychology, memory processes, etc (have a look at uni's lists of modules on offer). Additionally, the studies, to me, are quite basic e.g. a study showed children would copy an adult displaying aggression. It's kind of obvious through just making observations as you go about life and I don't think it warrants a proper, clinical study to prove something so simplistic.

    Neuroscience was my favourite part, but I noticed all my Neuroscince lecturers weren't even from a Psychology-background, and instead had gone Biology/Biomed type degrees. So I decided to switch into Biology.

    My experience with Biology has been positive. Mainly due to my uni giving a really large selection of modules so you can really tailor your degree (I keep away from all the plant biology modules, for example). Again, check the lists of modules on the uni's websites. Biology has a lot more contact hours (20-25hrs per week for me at the moment) compared to Psychology (around 7hrs per week). Again, this will vary uni-to-uni so contact head of admissions if you want more details about workloads and timetables. Biology has a heavier workload, too. Biology is roughly 70% exam and 30% coursework (essays, lab reports, online tests) whilst Psychology was 100% exams in first year. Biology is a lot more difficult and requires a lot more effort, but you get more contact hours in lectures and labs which aid understanding. You also have practicals every week which can be 2-4 hours long but are really interesting, you're using proper equipment and doing things like PCR that you will have only read about so far.

    So to summarise, Biology is a lot more difficult but, in my opinion, a lot more rewarding and interesting to study. If you like getting your teeth into complex pathways then Biology is for you. Psychology is easy to understand but requires a lot of rote memorisation of studies and findings.

    Quote me if you have any specific questions.
    Sorry I'm not the OP but I have the same problem as well. I presume you do biomedical science and I have some questions about the practical side. Are they like A-level Chemistry practicals e.g. handling a lot of chemicals cos I suck/scared of doing practicals and I'm not really good at it. I like the other modules but the heavy lab work is really off putting...
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    (Original post by Mnatalie99)
    Sorry I'm not the OP but I have the same problem as well. I presume you do biomedical science and I have some questions about the practical side. Are they like A-level Chemistry practicals e.g. handling a lot of chemicals cos I suck/scared of doing practicals and I'm not really good at it. I like the other modules but the heavy lab work is really off putting...
    I also hate practicals lol, they really trigger a lot of anxiety for me. The good thing is because everyone is from different schools with a wide distribution of experience doing practicals then they offer a lot of guidance. Most of my practicals have been pretty straight forward though. For example, Microbiology practicals where you're just pipetting samples onto agar plates or into test tubes. Again, it will vary depending on the university but in mine you do all the practicals in partners or groups which helps, also practical schedules are uploaded online before the practical so you can read ahead and see what you'll be doing, and if you don't understand a process (e.g. how to set up a gel electrophoresis) you can look it up on Google/Youtube for help. There's also a lot more demonstrators around watching over you and you can ask them questions, or you can ask your classmates around you. It's important to remember that everyone else is probably doing these practicals for the first time too. Just last week I was working in a group doing a genetics practical and the people in my group seemed so confident and sure, they got right into the practical whilst I was still trying to understand the handout, I got intimidated with how clever they seemed but they ended up completing messing it up and doing it completely wrong! Just goes to show that people who look like they know what they're doing sometimes don't. I've messed up several times, you just tell the demonstrator and they'll go fetch the stuff to start the experiment again, no big deal.

    I would say though, biomedical sciences is very lab-based, I do Biological Sciences so I do some of the same modules as the biomedics but also have some modules that have no lab component at all.
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    (Original post by LeaX)
    I also hate practicals lol, they really trigger a lot of anxiety for me. The good thing is because everyone is from different schools with a wide distribution of experience doing practicals then they offer a lot of guidance. Most of my practicals have been pretty straight forward though. For example, Microbiology practicals where you're just pipetting samples onto agar plates or into test tubes. Again, it will vary depending on the university but in mine you do all the practicals in partners or groups which helps, also practical schedules are uploaded online before the practical so you can read ahead and see what you'll be doing, and if you don't understand a process (e.g. how to set up a gel electrophoresis) you can look it up on Google/Youtube for help. There's also a lot more demonstrators around watching over you and you can ask them questions, or you can ask your classmates around you. It's important to remember that everyone else is probably doing these practicals for the first time too. Just last week I was working in a group doing a genetics practical and the people in my group seemed so confident and sure, they got right into the practical whilst I was still trying to understand the handout, I got intimidated with how clever they seemed but they ended up completing messing it up and doing it completely wrong! Just goes to show that people who look like they know what they're doing sometimes don't. I've messed up several times, you just tell the demonstrator and they'll go fetch the stuff to start the experiment again, no big deal.

    I would say though, biomedical sciences is very lab-based, I do Biological Sciences so I do some of the same modules as the biomedics but also have some modules that have no lab component at all.
    Oh thank god I found someone who understands my pain! All my classmates don't get why I'm so nervous and that I hate practicals more than sitting in the classroom -_- The chemistry practicals are the ones that get me- all the complicated steps and handling so many chemicals are so intimidating. Thank you for sharing your experience with me, it's really helpful and encouraging

    If you don't mind me asking, which uni do you go to? Your uni sounds really nice and supportive
 
 
 
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