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    I dunno. Look up coeliac disease on a site better suited to dispensing medical advice, I suggest.

    My hunch would be to avoid gluten, which shouldn't be too difficult nowadays.
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    Source - http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Coeliac...Treatment.aspx

    Treating coeliac disease Coeliac disease is usually treated by simply excluding foods that contain gluten from your diet.This prevents damage to the lining of your intestines (gut) and the associated symptoms, such as diarrhoea and stomach pain.If you have coeliac disease, you must give up all sources of gluten for life because eating foods that contain it will cause your symptoms to return, as well as long-term damage to your health.This may sound daunting, but your GP can give you help and advice about ways to manage your diet.Your symptoms should improve considerably within weeks of starting a gluten-free diet.However, it may take up to two years for your digestive system to heal completely. You will also need to return to your GP for regular check-ups.A gluten-free dietWhen you are first diagnosed with coeliac disease, you will be referred to a dietitian to help you adjust to your new diet without gluten. They can also ensure your diet is balanced and contains all the nutrients you need.If you have coeliac disease, you will no longer be able to eat foods that contain barley, rye or wheat, including farina, graham flour, semolina, durum, cous cous and spelt.Even if you only consume a small amount of gluten, such as a spoonful of pasta, you may have very unpleasant intestinal symptoms. If you keep consuming gluten regularly, you will also be at greater risk of osteoporosis and cancer in later life.Read more about complications of coeliac disease.As a protein, gluten is not essential to your diet and can be replaced by other foods. Many gluten-free alternatives are widely available in supermarkets and health food shops, including pasta, pizza bases and bread. A range of gluten-free foods is also available on prescription.Many basic foods – such as meat, vegetables, cheese, potatoes and rice – are naturally free from gluten so you can still include them in your diet. Your dietitian can help you identify which foods are safe to eat and which are not. If you are unsure, use the lists below as a general guide.Foods containing gluten (unsafe to eat)If you have coeliac disease, do not eat the following, unless they are labelled as gluten-free versions:
    • bread
    • pasta
    • cereals
    • biscuits or crackers
    • cakes and pastries
    • pies
    • gravies and sauces
    It is important to always check the labels of the foods you buy. Many foods – particularly those that are processed – contain gluten in additives, such as malt flavouring and modified food starch.Gluten may also be found in some non-food products, including lipstick, postage stamps and some types of medication. Cross-contamination can occur if gluten-free foods and foods that contain gluten are prepared together or served with the same utensils.Gluten-free foods (safe to eat)If you have coeliac disease, you can eat the following foods, which naturally do not contain gluten:
    • most dairy products, such as cheese, butter and milk
    • fruit and vegetables
    • meat and fish (although not breaded or battered)
    • potatoes
    • rice
    • gluten-free flours, including rice, corn, soy and potato
    By law, food labelled as gluten free can contain no more than 20 parts per million (ppm) of gluten.For most people, these trace amounts of gluten will not cause any problem. However, there are a minority of people with coeliac disease who are unable to tolerate even trace amounts of gluten and require a diet completely free from cereals.Read information about the law on gluten-free on the Coeliac UK website.The Coeliac UK website also contains information and advice about living with the condition, including a gluten-free diet and lifestyle.OatsOats do not contain gluten, but many people with coeliac disease avoid eating them because they can become contaminated with other cereals that do contain gluten.There's also some evidence to suggest a very small number of people may still be sensitive to products which are gluten-free and don't contain contaminated oats. This is because oats contain a protein called avenin, which is suitable for the majority of people with coeliac disease, but may trigger symptoms in a few cases.If, after discussing this with your health professional, you want to include oats in your diet, check the oats are pure and there is no possibility contamination could have occurred.It is recommended you should avoid eating oats until your gluten-free diet has taken full effect and your symptoms have been resolved. Once you are symptom free, gradually reintroduce oats into your diet. If you develop symptoms again, stop eating oats.Advice on feeding your babyDo not introduce gluten into your baby's diet before they are six months old. Breast milk is naturally gluten free and all infant milk formulas are, too.If you have coeliac disease, Coeliac UK recommends gluten-containing foods are introduced gradually when a child is six months old. This should be monitored carefully.Read more about support for parents on the Coeliac UK website.Other treatments As well as eliminating foods that contain gluten from your diet, a number of other treatments are available for coeliac disease. These are described below.VaccinationsIn some people, coeliac disease can cause the spleen to work less effectively, making you more vulnerable to infection.You may therefore need to have extra vaccinations, including:However, if your spleen is unaffected by coeliac disease, these vaccinations are not usually necessary.SupplementsAs well as cutting gluten out of your diet, your GP or dietitian may also recommend you take vitamin and mineral supplements, at least for the first six months after your diagnosis.This will ensure you get all the nutrients you need while your digestive system repairs itself. Taking supplements can also help correct any deficiencies, such as anaemia (a lack of iron in the blood).Dermatitis herpetiformisIf you have dermatitis herpetiformis (an itchy rash that can be caused by gluten intolerance), cutting gluten out of your diet should clear it up.However, sometimes it can take longer for a gluten-free diet to clear the rash than it does to control your other symptoms, such as diarrhoea and stomach pain.If this is the case, you may be prescribed medication to speed up the healing time of the rash. It is likely this will be a medicine calledDapsone, which is usually taken orally (in tablet form) twice a day.Dapsone can cause side effects, such as headaches and depression, so you will always be prescribed the lowest effective dose.You may need to take medication for up to two years to control your dermatitis herpetiformis. After this time, you should have been following a gluten-free diet long enough for the rash to be controlled without the need for medication. Refractory coeliac diseaseA rarer type of coeliac disease is refractory coeliac disease. In this form of the condition, for reasons that are still unclear, the symptoms continue to persist even when a person has switched to a gluten-free diet.It is estimated around 1 in every 140 people with coeliac disease will develop the refractory form of the condition.If you do develop suspected refractory coeliac disease, it is likely you will be referred for a series of tests to make sure your symptoms are not being caused by some other condition.If no other cause can be found and the diagnosis is confirmed, you will likely be referred to a specialist. Treatment options include steroid medication (corticosteroids), which can help block the harmful effects of the immune system.
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    I think my youth minster has this, she has to blend all her food and had to have a piece of intestine taken out from her.
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    (Original post by saraxh)
    Thank you
    "Greater risk at cancer". Well that scared me.
    I think I have something similar I don't know if it were coeliac or lactose intolerance or something. Either way, I haven't confirmed yet. I may even have some form of cancer but idk. Anyway, if I did discover something like a terminal condition, I'd just try my best to make light of it and get on with my life. Don't you think that's a good thing to do? I mean, if you can't eat something, you can't eat it just like if you're allergic to something, there's no point hanging around it.

    I would probably get a re-test after a month or something.
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    (Original post by saraxh)
    I got a blood test for Coeliac disease.
    Coeliac disease - A disease in which the small intestine is hypersensitive to gluten, leading to difficulty in digesting food.

    My results haven't come back yet. If I do have Coeliac disease what do I do to overcome this?
    I had the same test recently too and it came back clear. I hope yours does too! If you do have it, it's a lot easier to deal with than it used to be. There's 'free from' sections in supermarkets that are a great help. I used to use them when I stopped eating wheat. There's also loads of great gluten free recipes out there as well. Your doctor will be able to go through the rest with you. Don't scare yourself about all of the information online. I know it'll be tough, but there's plenty of people here to help you out
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    Please remember that diagnosing people with specific medical conditions is not allowed, as is trying to scare people with worst case scenarios. Also that worst case scenarios are just that- it doesn't mean they will actually happen

    Hope you're okay OP! It's not the end of the world, you'll get used to avoiding gluten and it's far better to know what you're dealing with. Also the intestine comment sounds far more like chrons disease or similar but I obviously can't say for certain! Cross that bridge if you come to it
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    (Original post by saraxh)
    Thanks Letting go of pizza & cereal That's really difficult.

    .
    The gluten free versions aren't bad The pasta takes a little getting used to, and I think it cooks a bit quicker which I didn't realise at first, but you get used to it
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    (Original post by saraxh)
    I got a blood test for Coeliac disease.
    Coeliac disease - A disease in which the small intestine is hypersensitive to gluten, leading to difficulty in digesting food.

    My results haven't come back yet. If I do have Coeliac disease what do I do to overcome this?
    As you said, it means a sensitivity to gluten (or wheat I believe). All you need to do id limit your intake of foods containing it. I say "all", but it can be difficult especially if your case is somewhat severe. You may find that you can eat things with small ammounts and just need to cut out the big offenders like bread and pasta or you may find you need to be very strict about it. I suggest you start off being strict and after a while start to introduce a couple of bits. If there is a specific food you feel bad you can't have anymore you could start with that. By doing this (you can eep a food diary to help you keep track) you'll start to get a better idea of your boundares.
    It's best to have as little as possible but it helps to know if you have a bit of leaway.
    You can find advice and recipies in loads of places for it and most supermarkets will have a free from section. It's not the end of the world. You just need to pay more attention to what you eat.

    You can also look at methods to ease your symptoms when you do have flare ups. My personal favirote relief for IBS (a simmilar reaction) is pepermint tablets. They stop the cramping feeling and I find it works better than buscopan.

    I was tested for coeliacs when I started with gut issues along with a bunch of other stuff. Mine came back clear and i've been told I have IBS instetad- basically a more random version of other intolerances with no clear trigger like gluten. They test you for coeliac because it's an easy one to test for, but you stand a decent chance of not having it so don't worry too much for now.
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    (Original post by saraxh)
    Thanks Letting go of pizza & cereal That's really difficult.

    .
    There are free-from alternatives for them which taste close and places like dominos and pizza hut offer gluten free options. You may find that you need to make your own a bit more (like buying a plain pizza and adding your own toppings) but you won't have to miss out completely.
    You may also find that small quantities are okay so you can still have the real thing now and then or find a brand with reduced ammounts.
 
 
 
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