Canadian honors requirement for postgraduate study in the UK

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Valucet
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Hi,

I am currently studying in Canada at McGill University. I want to apply for my masters in the UK. I see that most of the programs I am interested in require a "2:1 honors degree".

At my uni, "honors" is different section of a degree. You apply in your last year. You get in based on your grades. If you get in, you have to accomplish more credits in this last year. Those additional credits are research experience credit where you conduct a year long research project. You then get the denomination honors on your degree if you finish your project with a good grade.

Beside that, if students want to do research or need research experience, they are also allowed to take a year-long class that also allow them to to research without getting the denomination honors on their degree.

My question is the following: do I need to follow the first path (honors) to get into a masters in the uk? More fundamentally, do people who are awarded with a honors for their bachelor in the uk have more research experience than there other students?

I know you guys are required to write a dissertation in your final year. It is not the case in Canada. The two options described above are - I think - the equivalent of what you guys called a dissertation.

Thanks in advance!
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by Valucet)
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Check the websites of Universities with large overseas applicant pools eg Cambridge, Manchester, UCL - they will have pages for each country giving examples of comparative grades. Off the top of my head, I suspect, yes, you will need to do the research/Honors year.
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Valucet
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(Original post by threeportdrift)
Check the websites of Universities with large overseas applicant pools eg Cambridge, Manchester, UCL - they will have pages for each country giving examples of comparative grades. Off the top of my head, I suspect, yes, you will need to do the research/Honors year.
I've done this, and i'm still confused. I even sent email to them (no reply yet).

For instance, UCL says my degree needs to be NARIC approved. They don't want to take any risk by stating a minimum grade.

ICL says the following:

To be considered for admission to a Master's e.g. MSc, MRes, MBA etc,applicants should have completed a first degree with a minimum cumulative GPA score of 78% or 3.1+/4 from a mainstream university. A higher overall GPA is however normally required for most of our courses.Applicants for research should also be in possession of a Master's degree.

This is still imprecise to me. And all the websites are like that.
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by Valucet)
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Cambridge -

University Minimum RequirementBachelor’s Degree with honours or a four-year Bachelor’s Degree with an overall grade of 3.3/4, 3.6/4.3, B+ or 78% (on a 1-100 scale) Professional Degree (Naric) with a minimum overall grade of B+ or 78% Bachelor’s (3 years, without Honours) from Quebec with a grade of 3.3/4, 3.6/4.3, 10/12, B+ or 78% overall (on a 1-100 scale)

If the academic requirement of the course is a first:Bachelor’s Degree with honours or a four-year Bachelor’s Degree with an overall grade of 3.7/4, 4/4.3, 8, A, 83% (on a 1-100 scale) Bachelor’s (3 years, without Honours) from Quebec with a grade of 3.7/4, 4/4.3, 8, A, 83% (on a 1-100 scale)

As this seems to be the same as UCL are saying, I suspect UCL aso require the Honors route.

In England and Wales (it's different in Scotland), the only way that you don't get an honours degree is if you just scrape a pass. You have to do spectacularly badly, but not quite badly enough to fail. The honours element is so embedded in every degree that we often don't even mention it in the literature.
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Valucet
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(Original post by threeportdrift)
In England and Wales (it's different in Scotland), the only way that you don't get an honours degree is if you just scrape a pass. You have to do spectacularly badly, but not quite badly enough to fail. The honours element is so embedded in every degree that we often don't even mention it in the literature.
But as I showed, what you call honors is different than us in Canada. I wonder if they mean the Canadian sense of honors or the English sense...
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by Valucet)
But as I showed, what you call honors is different than us in Canada. I wonder if they mean the Canadian sense of honors or the English sense...
They mean the Canadian sense - it's describing the Canadian equivalent.
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