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Is it worth applying for jobs that I'm not 100% sure I'll like?

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    I'm really struggling to figure out what job I want, I know the kind of things I could do with my degree but there's nothing specific that I'm good at or interested in. There are a couple of things that have stood out in the *tiniest* way but it's not enough for me to think right, I want to do this.

    The ones I'm looking at are grad programmes which will last a few years and involve studying towards professional qualifications. I'm not sure I could commit to something like that if I'm not totally sure it's what I want. I'm also not confident at all in my abilities to even do the job right. Thoughts?
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    Yes, it's better than nothing. You can't always get the dream career. You might never actually find that job that 100% interests you and most people don't. Just apply to anything you find vaguely interesting and which pays a decent salary and has good opportunities.

    The graduate schemes that lead to professional qualifications are especially good since they will provide you with a lot of opportunities.
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    (Original post by rainbow.panda)
    I'm really struggling to figure out what job I want, I know the kind of things I could do with my degree but there's nothing specific that I'm good at or interested in. There are a couple of things that have stood out in the *tiniest* way but it's not enough for me to think right, I want to do this.

    The ones I'm looking at are grad programmes which will last a few years and involve studying towards professional qualifications. I'm not sure I could commit to something like that if I'm not totally sure it's what I want. I'm also not confident at all in my abilities to even do the job right. Thoughts?
    Do you really think you are going to find something you 100% like just from sitting around thinking about it? You have to try things and learn what you do and don't like. You have to crack on and do something and work out if this is 100% what you like, or 80% or 40% or 0%, and then you have to stick it out for as long as employers generally judge to be a reasonable time (about 2 years), before moving on to something that is closer to 100%. THat's how life is, if you don't have a vocation/inspiration.

    Try talking to a few people that have reasonably established careers and see how diverse their routes are, and how they have changed course, gradually or suddenly. Talk to them about how they have changed, because your views on life at 20 and not usually the same when you are 30, or 40. So sitting around waiting for inspiration about a job that you are sure you are going to like 100% is almost certain to be futile, it will never happen.
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    (Original post by rainbow.panda)
    I'm really struggling to figure out what job I want, I know the kind of things I could do with my degree but there's nothing specific that I'm good at or interested in. There are a couple of things that have stood out in the *tiniest* way but it's not enough for me to think right, I want to do this.

    The ones I'm looking at are grad programmes which will last a few years and involve studying towards professional qualifications. I'm not sure I could commit to something like that if I'm not totally sure it's what I want. I'm also not confident at all in my abilities to even do the job right. Thoughts?
    *

    If you are still at uni take the time to get some work experience, although remember many people don't find jobs they 100% and you can move around a bit. As far as confidence in your abilities, I think to an extent we all have that doubt, you have to trust that when you do get a job offer an employer has made it because they believe you are good enough.*
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    The best option is to follow further training - say a Grad Scheme. It is virtually impossible to know what you like until you've tried. You need to stick it out until you have the professional qualification. You may not then pursue a career in that sphere but no experience or qualification is ever a total loss. You will have learned things that will always stand you in good stead how to make a presentation, speak to people, write reports for example, Lots of people qualify as accountants, teachers, doctors, solicitors etc etc. but don't pursue that career but go into journalism administration, the civil service, public relations, politics lecturing etc.

    A lot of whether you like a particular job is the people you are working with. If the atmosphere is jolly and interesting you'll like it whatever.
 
 
 
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