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    (Original post by muncrun)
    The word 'summer' has two meanings: one is a season and begins with a capital letter; the other is used in a poetic/literary context and denotes years, particularly with regard to a person's age.
    or someone who adds things up
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    I love this thread! Why didn't I see it before? Cheers for starting it, edders.

    I haven't had time to read the whole thread, as I'm at work - but has anyone brought up 'who' and 'whom' yet?
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    (Original post by MadNatSci)
    I love this thread! Why didn't I see it before? Cheers for starting it, edders.

    I haven't had time to read the whole thread, as I'm at work - but has anyone brought up 'who' and 'whom' yet?
    I was told you can use 'whom' if it would still sound right replaced with 'him'. Not sure if this rule works 100%
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    (Original post by Gimp)
    I was told you can use 'whom' if it would still sound right replaced with 'him'. Not sure if this rule works 100%
    ... and don't get me started on 'affect' and 'effect'...
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    ...and let us never speak of the split infinitive.
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    (Original post by muncrun)
    ...and let us never speak of the split infinitive.
    I try to not do them but I think I already split a couple in this thread to deliberately annoy grammatical purists , my first post on this thread in fact
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    (Original post by Gimp)
    I try to not do them but I think I already split a couple in this thread to deliberately annoy grammatical purists , my first post on this thread in fact
    It's a rule that's a little blurred at the edges, anway. Fowler notes that they should be avoided except where the clarity and tone of the sentence would be ruined if the rule is applied.
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    (Original post by Gimp)
    I was told you can use 'whom' if it would still sound right replaced with 'him'. Not sure if this rule works 100%
    Yeah, I guess it sort of does.. except in a question: "Of him do you speak?" sounds a bit daft (though admittedly "Of whom do you speak?" sounds a little archaic...)

    Aaaaargh affect and effect! How do you get it into people's heads?! I guess you could say it's "thE Effect", perhaps, and so by elimination "to affect". Although there's the verb "to effect" as well... Oh, pigs' bottoms! There MUST be a good way of teaching it!

    (I wish people still taught grammar properly in English lessons too - it would have made my life a lot easier when learning French and German, since at the beginning I didn't have any idea what adverbs and pronouns and things actually were.)
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    (Original post by MadNatSci)
    (I wish people still taught grammar properly in English lessons too - it would have made my life a lot easier when learning French and German, since at the beginning I didn't have any idea what adverbs and pronouns and things actually were.)
    I had the same problem with things like direct and indirect object pronouns in French.

    (Original post by MadNatSci)
    Yeah, I guess it sort of does.. except in a question: "Of him do you speak?" sounds a bit daft (though admittedly "Of whom do you speak?" sounds a little archaic...)

    Aaaaargh affect and effect! How do you get it into people's heads?! I guess you could say it's "thE Effect", perhaps, and so by elimination "to affect". Although there's the verb "to effect" as well... Oh, pigs' bottoms! There MUST be a good way of teaching it!

    (I wish people still taught grammar properly in English lessons too - it would have made my life a lot easier when learning French and German, since at the beginning I didn't have any idea what adverbs and pronouns and things actually were.)
    at my school we did latin and we spent the first term of y7 latin lessons doing english grammar so we would understand what a noun etc was.. they didn't expect us to have the slightest clue from primary school!

    and it really did help with foreign languages (both that and latin itself)
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    (Original post by crana)
    at my school we did latin and we spent the first term of y7 latin lessons doing english grammar so we would understand what a noun etc was.. they didn't expect us to have the slightest clue from primary school!

    and it really did help with foreign languages (both that and latin itself)
    Bring back Latin!

    (Original post by Geogger)
    Bring back Latin!
    the GCSE is absolutely *******s though because you have to memorise these huge long pages of english for no reason... because you have to be able to translate the latin but the only way unless yoiu are a super genius to translate it so it sounds right (so i am told) is to learn the english translation and how the two relate to each other... you usually cant directly translate into english or it makes no sense...with literature anyway.

    so it is absolutely crap

    i found some text files on my computer of the translations i made as a "revision guide" for myself and it brought back such awful memories of Ovid, Martial etc... Ummidia Quadratilla and the country mouse and his vetch will haunt me forever...

    we also had to learn (not off by heart but the details of all of them) stories about roman mythology from a translated book by Ovid... loads of them... with no actual latin involved at all... and then it would say like "Who was standing next to the person who shot the boar?" and stuff it was really random and evil

    *end rant*

    latin is helpful - GCSE latin is rubbish. i forbade (is that right?) my sister to take it.
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    (Original post by crana)
    the GCSE is absolutely *******s though because you have to memorise these huge long pages of english for no reason... because you have to be able to translate the latin but the only way unless yoiu are a super genius to translate it so it sounds right (so i am told) is to learn the english translation and how the two relate to each other... you usually cant directly translate into english or it makes no sense...with literature anyway.

    so it is absolutely crap

    i found some text files on my computer of the translations i made as a "revision guide" for myself and it brought back such awful memories of Ovid, Martial etc... Ummidia Quadratilla and the country mouse and his vetch will haunt me forever...

    we also had to learn (not off by heart but the details of all of them) stories about roman mythology from a translated book by Ovid... loads of them... with no actual latin involved at all... and then it would say like "Who was standing next to the person who shot the boar?" and stuff it was really random and evil

    *end rant*

    latin is helpful - GCSE latin is rubbish. i forbade (is that right?) my sister to take it.
    Actually I agree - I was taught Latin many, many years ago - NOT using the methods you were. I have always found it logical, helpful and a real boon when it comes to both vocabulary and crosswords!

    (Original post by Geogger)
    Actually I agree - I was taught Latin many, many years ago - NOT using the methods you were. I have always found it logical, helpful and a real boon when it comes to both vocabulary and crosswords!

    I dont think it was my teacher's fault kinda... it wasn't the method we actually learnt any latin by, it was just the rather stupid requirements of the exam board..

    and i dont even remember most of them now
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    (Original post by Jools)
    a Grade B in GCSE English Lit...
    ...and an A in A'Level English Language. :rolleyes:
    Qualifications are hardly necessary to be good at grammar though. Anyone can do it if they put their mind to it!
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    Note to grammarians everywhere: my girlfriend from the US is visiting me and will be staying until 11 August, so I won't be checking on the forum often until after then. As such, my rep 'awards' will be rarer too, but please keep up the good debates!

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    Ive only just found this thread - i pride myself on excellent grammer and spelling.
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    (Original post by yellowtaxi)
    Ive only just found this thread - i pride myself on excellent grammer and spelling.
    Lol, did you miss out the apostrophe and misspell grammar on purpose then?
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    (Original post by Nylex)
    Lol, did you miss out the apostrophe and misspell grammar on purpose then?
    no...grammer is spelt rite.
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    Ah, the irony... :rolleyes:
 
 
 
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