edders' campaign for grammatical excellence

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TK
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#101
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#101
(Original post by DazYa777)
Like you did on msn?
That is a physical impossibility, as i'm sure you are aware. Anyhow, this topic has been discussed many a time, and if you wish to continue the discussion, may I suggest that you PM me.
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tis_me_lord
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#102
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#102
(Original post by edders)
Where are the colons? The semicolons? Just think of the children!
I think children prefer shiny things to colons.
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TK
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#103
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#103
(Original post by Fluffy)
You do not always start a sentence with a capital letter. To give an example, the following have very different meanings: "rhp51, rhp55 and rhp57 display homology to..." and: "Rhp51, Rhp55 and Rhp57 display homology to..."

If you capitalise the 'rhps' in example one, then you are no longer talking about genes, but proteins.
Science and English do not mix!
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elpaw
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#104
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#104
(Original post by edders)
Where are the colons? The semicolons? Just think of the children!
they have been colonically irigated
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not1
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#105
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#105
(Original post by Fluffy)
If you capitalise the 'rhps' in example one, then you are no longer talking about genes, but proteins.
That is rather specialist though.
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Pzyko
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#106
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#106
(Original post by DazYa777)
PM? Please do not abbreviate.
We've discussed this, and apparently we're allowed to.
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Quiksilver
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#107
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#107
(Original post by DazYa777)
A's*
no way, its As
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Pzyko
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#108
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#108
(Original post by Quiksilver)
no way, its As
Both are correct.
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TK
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#109
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#109
(Original post by DazYa777)
A's*
Look kiddo - stop being silly. You are making too many mistakes. This is why I do not interfere in the science-dominated academic subforum.

In other words, don't try to correct people who are better informed than yourself in a particular area.
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Pzyko
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#110
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#110
(Original post by DazYa777)
Not in my books.
But we are in edders' campaign, and, in the end, isn't that what really matters?
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elpaw
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#111
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#111
People, it's "starred As".
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Fluffy
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#112
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#112
(Original post by edders)
Ah I see. Should the course not be called 'business language' or something else then?
I don't think, mainly because we were taught grammar not 'business language'. We revised the rules of grammar, but incorparated other factors which result in greater clarity. Clarity is important in business communications, but might not represent 'best grammar usage'.

If the course was called 'business language', then one may have expected to learn terminology. We did not.
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TK
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#113
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#113
(Original post by elpaw)
People, it's "starred As".
Those are not available at A Level (as far as I am aware). I was just referring to the plural of a grade A.
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Fluffy
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#114
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#114
(Original post by DazYa777)
Let me tell you, there is no comma between However and like Trust me.
Sorry, but there is a comma between 'However' and 'like'. The reason that there is is because the word 'however' is a conjuntive adverb.
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not1
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#115
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#115
(Original post by elpaw)
People, it's "starred As".
"Starred A's", you mean?
It is legitimate to put a separating apostrophe between a single letter and its pluralising 's' I think.
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TK
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#116
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#116
(Original post by DazYa777)
Kiddo? Is this even in the dictionary? Science-dominated? Such sterotypical views of someone that cannot comprehend and understand the science lectures in her schooling.

Informed? Please reassess the word and find one that best fits the sentence. It should have been along the lines of: " That have a better understanding in the English Language "
Oh dear...
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Pzyko
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#117
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#117
(Original post by edders)
"Starred A's", you mean?
It is legitimate to put a separating apostrophe between a single letter and its pluralising 's' I think.
As I said, but nobody noticed, both are correct.
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TK
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#118
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#118
(Original post by edders)
"Starred A's", you mean?
It is legitimate to put a separating apostrophe between a single letter and its pluralising 's' I think.
I'm (pretty) sure it's not. Where can we find out for sure? Any ideas?
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Pzyko
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#119
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#119
(Original post by DazYa777)
It can be argued either way. I'd prefer my way as it is fluent when spoken.
No it can't. In this situation, 'however' should always be followed by a comma.
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elpaw
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#120
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#120
(Original post by edders)
"Starred A's", you mean?
It is legitimate to put a separating apostrophe between a single letter and its pluralising 's' I think.
If I had put in the apostrophe you would have criticised me saying that it was perfectly acceptable to leave it out. It's a catch-22 situation with you.
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