Theresa May will abolish EU laws in the UK

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    "Theresa May will on Sunday announce she will repeal the 1972 European Communities Act in a move that will formally begin the process of making Britain’s Parliament sovereign once again.

    Addressing the Conservative Party Conference for the first time as leader, Mrs May will declare that her government will begin work to end the legislation that gives European Union law supremacy in Britain.

    In its place, a new “Great Repeal Bill” will be introduced in Parliament as early as next year to put power for the nation’s laws back into the hands of MPs and peers.
    The announcement is Mrs May’s first firm commitment on Brexit since becoming PM in July and marks a major step on the road to ending the country’s EU membership.

    Leading Eurosceptics are likely to cheer the news after they put repealing the law at the heart of a “Brexit manifesto” published just days before the referendum. Ministers will also announce protections for workers’ rights secured via Brussels, such as parental leave and automatic holiday, to pre-empt Labour attacks.
    It is intended to show critics that No 10 does have a plan for Brexit, after weeks of sniping that the Government does not have a clear strategy for the forthcoming negotiations"

    Source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016...xe-to-eu-laws/

    I am absolutely excited about the good news. Lets make Britain free and independent again. UK is to become sovereign again, and it is very exciting indeed. It is time for us to free ourselves from having our laws controlled by corrupt, dangerous, bad agenda, foreign bureacrats.
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    (Original post by Naveed-7)
    "Theresa May will on Sunday announce she will repeal the 1972 European Communities Act in a move that will formally begin the process of making Britain’s Parliament sovereign once again.

    Addressing the Conservative Party Conference for the first time as leader, Mrs May will declare that her government will begin work to end the legislation that gives European Union law supremacy in Britain.

    In its place, a new “Great Repeal Bill” will be introduced in Parliament as early as next year to put power for the nation’s laws back into the hands of MPs and peers.
    The announcement is Mrs May’s first firm commitment on Brexit since becoming PM in July and marks a major step on the road to ending the country’s EU membership.

    Leading Eurosceptics are likely to cheer the news after they put repealing the law at the heart of a “Brexit manifesto” published just days before the referendum. Ministers will also announce protections for workers’ rights secured via Brussels, such as parental leave and automatic holiday, to pre-empt Labour attacks.
    It is intended to show critics that No 10 does have a plan for Brexit, after weeks of sniping that the Government does not have a clear strategy for the forthcoming negotiations"

    Source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016...xe-to-eu-laws/

    I am absolutely excited about the good news. Lets make Britain free and independent again. UK is to become sovereign again, and it is very exciting indeed. It is time for us to free ourselves from having our laws controlled by corrupt, dangerous, bad agenda, foreign bureacrats.
    There are some sceptics (not necessarily eurosceptics) saying that she doesn't really have a plan. Anyway, as for being "free" from the corrupt, dangerous, bad agenda, foreign bureaucrats, that's funny. Or maybe I'm wrong and that will really happen. Who knows. Maybe you should thrive and evolve from this excitement - indeed, if your perspective's in the positive light, good things are sure to occur.
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    Great news. I was skeptical of TM at first, but she seems to be respecting the referendum result and laying the groundwork for Brexit.
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    Good, get out of single market.
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    (Original post by Naveed-7)
    "Theresa May will on Sunday announce she will repeal the 1972 European Communities Act in a move that will formally begin the process of making Britain’s Parliament sovereign once again.

    Addressing the Conservative Party Conference for the first time as leader, Mrs May will declare that her government will begin work to end the legislation that gives European Union law supremacy in Britain.

    In its place, a new “Great Repeal Bill” will be introduced in Parliament as early as next year to put power for the nation’s laws back into the hands of MPs and peers.
    The announcement is Mrs May’s first firm commitment on Brexit since becoming PM in July and marks a major step on the road to ending the country’s EU membership.

    Leading Eurosceptics are likely to cheer the news after they put repealing the law at the heart of a “Brexit manifesto” published just days before the referendum. Ministers will also announce protections for workers’ rights secured via Brussels, such as parental leave and automatic holiday, to pre-empt Labour attacks.
    It is intended to show critics that No 10 does have a plan for Brexit, after weeks of sniping that the Government does not have a clear strategy for the forthcoming negotiations"

    Source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016...xe-to-eu-laws/

    I am absolutely excited about the good news. Lets make Britain free and independent again. UK is to become sovereign again, and it is very exciting indeed. It is time for us to free ourselves from having our laws controlled by corrupt, dangerous, bad agenda, foreign bureacrats.
    Cant see why its news? This was always the natural consequence of Brexit.

    They will also have to leave a lot of EU law intact till they figure out which bits of legislation we need.
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    (Original post by Naveed-7)

    I am absolutely excited about the good news. Lets make Britain free and independent again. UK is to become sovereign again, and it is very exciting indeed. It is time for us to free ourselves from having our laws controlled by corrupt, dangerous, bad agenda, foreign bureacrats.
    As Sir Humphrey would say, "very courageous Prime Minister"

    Politically, it was clear Theresa May had to do something. It was looking like complete drift at the heart of government.

    However, what she is intending is politically dangerous. She is trying to get the nuts and bolts of Brexit through before the deal is struck. Unquestionably, if she had waited until the deal was struck, any battle would be over the deal and if the deal went through, the technicalities would have gone on the nod.

    She is now giving an opportunity for an argument on the nuts and bolts, possibly involving opponents who support Brexit in principle, without victory in that argument stopping an argument over the Brexit deal.

    The first thing is that she is disappointing the Eurosceptic free market hard right of the Tory Party who have always seen Brexit as an opportunity to roll back the State. They have always assumed that they could reduce what is transferred from the EU to the UK. This proposal shoots that fox. The whole panoply of employment laws and the Common Fisheries Policy etc will move over. They are not that much further forward. True, the decisions will now be taken in Westminster, but they will lose the demonising effect of "EU". The British State will move in a leftwards direction by this proposal.

    Secondly, this proposal is likely to empower government at the expense of Parliament. UK legislation comes in a variety of forms: Acts of Parliament are subject to line by line scrutiny, affirmative statutory instruments that must be approved but cannot be amended by Parliament, negative statutory instruments which will only be debated if politically controversial, and other statutory instruments with no Parliamentary involvement. The EU doesn't have this division. Its law is made the same way, whether important or trivial. If the whole of EU law becomes part of UK law, how is it to be amended?

    There will be a lot of amendments every year to "maintain" the law and many many more to deal with the practicalities of Brexit. If under EU law a document has to be filed in Luxembourg, we are going to have to change that and say it must be filed in Basildon. No-one is going to have any problem with this type of stuff being determined by statutory instrument. But what about big changes that Parliament wouldn't normally allow the UK government to make except by Act of Parliament. Will Parliament be content to allow the government to make "big ticket" decisions by statutory instrument if they are repatriated EU powers? How do you tell the difference between what matters and what doesn't if there is no difference in the format of major and minor provisions? A lot of MPs will be concerned if Brexit doesn't return power to Parliament.

    Thirdly, there is the possibility of wrecking amendments in the Lords. What if they say the Act isn't to come into force without a second referendum? That would mean a battle under the Parliament Act for a government with a small majority (remember the Commons must pass the same legislation twice so the Parliament Act can be defeated by an amendment in the Commons second time around) at the same time as trying to negotiate Brexit.
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    Let's see how many they get rid of
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    I'm a tad suprised that she'd put the leglislation forward so soon but saying that she'll repeal the 1972 act is kind of like saying that i'll need the toilet later.. i.e. it's a fact of life if we're leaving.
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    This proposal will have a big impact on the EU as well.

    Suddenly there will be two authoritative interpreters of EU law. The UK Supreme Court and the European Court of Justice will both be interpreting the same law with co-equal authority. The British court is generally seen as having the better lawyers. That will put a lot of pressure on the ECJ.


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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    This proposal will have a big impact on the EU as well.

    Suddenly there will be two authoritative interpreters of EU law. The UK Supreme Court and the European Court of Justice will both be interpreting the same law with co-equal authority. The British court is generally seen as having the better lawyers. That will put a lot of pressure on the ECJ.


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    Why?

    Wont the ECJ be supreme on matters of EU law until the date we are no longer in the EU, in which case it simply transfer to the Supreme court?
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Why?

    Wont the ECJ be supreme on matters of EU law until the date we are no longer in the EU, in which case it simply transfer to the Supreme court?

    Only in the UK.

    Let's say some question of EU law comes up in 2023.

    If that case originates in France, it will ultimately be determined by the ECJ.

    If it comes up under the EU law adopted into UK law it will ultimately be determined by the UK Supreme Court.

    But it is the same law, so the lawyers in the case in whichever jurisdiction it arises will be using precedents from both jurisdictions to advance their respective arguments.

    Over time "proper" EU law and British EU law may diverge as the EU introduces new provisions if we choose not to adopt them. We will preserve an historic version of EU law. Alternatively commercial reasons may mean we mirror what the EU does. In reality, it is likely to be a bit of both. Generally the more connected regulations are to exports, the more we will follow the EU. The greater the impact on life within the UK, the less likely we are to follow them.






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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    Only in the UK.

    Let's say some question of EU law comes up in 2023.

    If that case originates in France, it will ultimately be determined by the ECJ.

    If it comes up under the EU law adopted into UK law it will ultimately be determined by the UK Supreme Court.

    But it is the same law, so the lawyers in the case in whichever jurisdiction it arises will be using precedents from both jurisdictions to advance their respective arguments.

    Over time "proper" EU law and British EU law may diverge as the EU introduces new provisions if we choose not to adopt them. We will preserve an historic version of EU law. Alternatively commercial reasons may mean we mirror what the EU does. In reality, it is likely to be a bit of both. Generally the more connected regulations are to exports, the more we will follow the EU. The greater the impact on life within the UK, the less likely we are to follow them.






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    Think there are bigger fish to fry. Am sure the supreme court will be aware of it and the implications for the administration of justice. not soemthing I will lose sleep over. In effect once we have left it will become soley UK law despite its unique origins. Not something I will be losing sleep over, although I get your point.
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    (Original post by Naveed-7)
    I am absolutely excited about the good news. Lets make Britain free and independent again. UK is to become sovereign again, and it is very exciting indeed. It is time for us to free ourselves from having our laws controlled by corrupt, dangerous, bad agenda, foreign bureacrats.
    I reluctantly voted for Brexit, but honestly I am much more circumspect than you are. I realised there was risk associated with it, and it remains to be seen what sort of deal we will get. It is true that once again, parliament will be practically unfettered and unchained viz. its legislating for the good of the kingdom. But we should also be realistic; there will be a price to pay for it.

    Excited isn't a word I'd use for my mood on this at the moment. Wary and cautious are a better fit for my mindset at the regarding Brexit. We shall have to wait and see how it all pans out. Though I do not resile from the choice I made, or that the people have spoken and the United Kingdom will be leaving the European Union.
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    (Original post by Naveed-7)
    "Theresa May will on Sunday announce she will repeal the 1972 European Communities Act in a move that will formally begin the process of making Britain’s Parliament sovereign once again.

    Addressing the Conservative Party Conference for the first time as leader, Mrs May will declare that her government will begin work to end the legislation that gives European Union law supremacy in Britain.

    In its place, a new “Great Repeal Bill” will be introduced in Parliament as early as next year to put power for the nation’s laws back into the hands of MPs and peers.
    The announcement is Mrs May’s first firm commitment on Brexit since becoming PM in July and marks a major step on the road to ending the country’s EU membership.

    Leading Eurosceptics are likely to cheer the news after they put repealing the law at the heart of a “Brexit manifesto” published just days before the referendum. Ministers will also announce protections for workers’ rights secured via Brussels, such as parental leave and automatic holiday, to pre-empt Labour attacks.
    It is intended to show critics that No 10 does have a plan for Brexit, after weeks of sniping that the Government does not have a clear strategy for the forthcoming negotiations"

    Source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016...xe-to-eu-laws/

    I am absolutely excited about the good news. Lets make Britain free and independent again. UK is to become sovereign again, and it is very exciting indeed. It is time for us to free ourselves from having our laws controlled by corrupt, dangerous, bad agenda, foreign bureacrats.
    No they are repealing the bill.

    After that they can then choose to abolish and amend laws


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    (Original post by paul514)
    No they are repealing the bill.

    After that they can then choose to abolish and amend laws


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    Agreed. My mistake.
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    Lmao, love how people are celebrating their "freedom" from mandatory refund periods on everything they buy, the safest products in the world, regular work breaks and some of the best workers' rights in the world.

    The turkeys are in the oven and they still don't know what's going on.
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    (Original post by JordanL_)
    Lmao, love how people are celebrating their "freedom" from mandatory refund periods on everything they buy, the safest products in the world, regular work breaks and some of the best workers' rights in the world.

    The turkeys are in the oven and they still don't know what's going on.
    Ah yes because the UK had no holiday pay or other worker's rights before joining the EU...

    The UK actually introduced holiday pay in 1938.

    The EU guarantees workers a minimum of 20 days paid holiday; the UK gives you 28 days.

    The EU gives 14 weeks of maternity leave; the UK gives 52.

    I suggest that you check your facts before posting incorrect information.
 
 
 
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