Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Computer Science Vs Mathematics Watch

Announcements
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Im not sure which degree i should be studying.

    So I love maths , I find it very interesting and fascinating.I'm not sure yet what I want to do in the future but i want to study something relating to maths. Yes i know that Maths has more maths in it than computer science but I think after computer science I will have many more options for jobs compared to maths which i think there are fewer jobs compared to computer science. I also have no programming knowledge and very basic knowledge of computers. Could you way up disadvantages of each degree maybe ? I am finding it very difficult to decide what i want to study .
    • Political Ambassador
    • Welcome Squad
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by HideyoKids)
    Im not sure which degree i should be studying.

    So I love maths , I find it very interesting and fascinating.I'm not sure yet what I want to do in the future but i want to study something relating to maths. Yes i know that Maths has more maths in it than computer science but I think after computer science I will have many more options for jobs compared to maths which i think there are fewer jobs compared to computer science. I also have no programming knowledge and very basic knowledge of computers. Could you way up disadvantages of each degree maybe ? I am finding it very difficult to decide what i want to study .
    You can do a joint honours degree. Mathematics with Computer Science.
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    Don't do a degree because you want to get a job out of it. Computer science is not maths, and maths is not computer science, you sound like you think they're almost the same and they are most definitely not. There are many jobs available to mathematicians from banking to accountancy to investing to finance or economics, or even as a programmer or engineer.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    If you "have no programming knowledge and very basic knowledge of computers." then it's going to be pretty damn difficult pursuing a degree in computer science. I think the reason why you're thinking of computer science is because of the maths element.

    I think Oxidation suggested something good - mathematics with some other subject like computer science. That could be good.
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by HideyoKids)
    Im not sure which degree i should be studying.

    So I love maths , I find it very interesting and fascinating.I'm not sure yet what I want to do in the future but i want to study something relating to maths. Yes i know that Maths has more maths in it than computer science but I think after computer science I will have many more options for jobs compared to maths which i think there are fewer jobs compared to computer science. I also have no programming knowledge and very basic knowledge of computers. Could you way up disadvantages of each degree maybe ? I am finding it very difficult to decide what i want to study .
    You might want to consider a dual program, either joint (50:50) or major/minor (not sure what the ratio is there) studying both maths and computer science. Depending on the type of computer science course you pick, you can easily end up with very small mathematical elements, for example maybe one or two compulsory applied maths modules and maybe a couple of options to pick statistics modules. On the other hand if you went for a more theoretical comp. sci. degree then there would be much more mathematics and much less of the practical stuff.

    Depending on what type of job you want to go for, studying maths alone could be fine. Depending on the modules available, you could find yourself using MATLAB and R programming languages on a maths degree.

    Also, don't worry about not knowing how to programme, you won't be alone. Though I would recommend getting yourself a Raspberry Pi and playing around with that. If you fancy learning a language, python or Java would be a good one to look at (don't expect to pick either up quickly, give them a lot of time to come to grips with).
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Et Tu, Brute?)
    You might want to consider a dual program, either joint (50:50) or major/minor (not sure what the ratio is there) studying both maths and computer science. Depending on the type of computer science course you pick, you can easily end up with very small mathematical elements, for example maybe one or two compulsory applied maths modules and maybe a couple of options to pick statistics modules. On the other hand if you went for a more theoretical comp. sci. degree then there would be much more mathematics and much less of the practical stuff.

    Depending on what type of job you want to go for, studying maths alone could be fine. Depending on the modules available, you could find yourself using MATLAB and R programming languages on a maths degree.

    Also, don't worry about not knowing how to programme, you won't be alone. Though I would recommend getting yourself a Raspberry Pi and playing around with that. If you fancy learning a language, python or Java would be a good one to look at (don't expect to pick either up quickly, give them a lot of time to come to grips with).
    Right thanks. Would a 50/50 degree not be as strong as 1 solid degree or is it the same in the eyes of employers. I have started reading a book based on CS. Are job opportunities in both degrees about the same ? I know that after CS there is a lot i can do because i have personally not decided a field i would like to work in, my ideal degree would have great options for me to go into different industries.
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by HideyoKids)
    Right thanks. Would a 50/50 degree not be as strong as 1 solid degree or is it the same in the eyes of employers. I have started reading a book based on CS. Are job opportunities in both degrees about the same ? I know that after CS there is a lot i can do because i have personally not decided a field i would like to work in, my ideal degree would have great options for me to go into different industries.
    yes and no...it depends on the job you are applying for and the modules you have chosen/final year project. If you are applying for a job in say data analysis then I wouldn't say you would be at a disadvantage whatsoever. On the other hand if you did a comp sci. degree and it was made up of mostly statistics, maths, databases etc type modules then you'd struggle to get a job as a software engineer.

    If you want different options, then definitely go for the joint degree. Just bare in mind that there is a chance you would need to do a masters to specialise in a particular area (which many people coming of ordinary degrees need to do anyway). The joint degree isn't any less solid that an ordinary one, but just be aware that some jobs will want to see certain modules on your application. If you have no idea what you want to do though, I'd say the joint degree is actually your best option.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    computer science is a cool subject .

    it has lots of mathematics

    one of the hardest subject in computer science was "computer oriented numerical methods in c "
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Should Spain allow Catalonia to declare independence?
    Help with your A-levels

    All the essentials

    The adventure begins mug

    Student life: what to expect

    What it's really like going to uni

    Rosette

    Essay expert

    Learn to write like a pro with our ultimate essay guide.

    Uni match

    Uni match

    Our tool will help you find the perfect course for you

    Study planner

    Create a study plan

    Get your head around what you need to do and when with the study planner tool.

    Study planner

    Resources by subject

    Everything from mind maps to class notes.

    Hands typing

    Degrees without fees

    Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

    A student doing homework

    Study tips from A* students

    Students who got top grades in their A-levels share their secrets

    Study help links and info

    Can you help? Study help unanswered threadsRules and posting guidelines

    Sponsored content:

    HEAR

    HEAR

    Find out how a Higher Education Achievement Report can help you prove your achievements.

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.