In Nursing can you avoid...

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    hello, I'm not great with personal care (or poop).
    Is there anyway to avoid this once qualified mainly the personal care such as morning washes and changes bed etc.
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    If you're not good with personal care, why are you considering joining a profession which prides itself in being caring?
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    (Original post by Clfrg)
    hello, I'm not great with personal care (or poop).
    Is there anyway to avoid this once qualified mainly the personal care such as morning washes and changes bed etc.
    Moved to the correct area.

    Basically, no. You may, eventually, move up to a management role where you would have very little clinical contact, however this would require many years practice. Even if you do somehow manage to avoid personal care most of the time, you will not be popular on the ward - no one likes to work with someone who does not want to help out. Nurses need to be happy to pitch in with all aspects of care, and this is one of them. I would strongly suggest reconsidering your career path if this is how you feel. *
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    Hi I'm glad I found this thread. I have a similar question. I'm all for personal care having worked in care with the elderly for 2 years now and counting. I'm considering applying to uni again for adult nursing, I failed my first interview for mental health. The only thing that's putting me off adult nursing is catheterisation. Can someone confirm if learning/applying this in the workforce is an optional module or compulsory. I wouldn't say I'm faint hearted but I do wince each time I've seen patients wince when having a catheter installed and I just can't seem to bring myself round to putting someone through that pain. And as minor as it may sound, it would affect my entire life and career choice if it is indeed an important aspect of being a qualified nurse. I couldn't tolerate it as a care assistant and only allowed to observe but I'm shuddering at the prospect of doing it myself but again t mah be one of those things I will get used to once I've done it a few times. But for now, in relation to the thread, is this something I can avoid or?
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    (Original post by uzkhalid2012)
    Hi I'm glad I found this thread. I have a similar question. I'm all for personal care having worked in care with the elderly for 2 years now and counting. I'm considering applying to uni again for adult nursing, I failed my first interview for mental health. The only thing that's putting me off adult nursing is catheterisation. Can someone confirm if learning/applying this in the workforce is an optional module or compulsory. I wouldn't say I'm faint hearted but I do wince each time I've seen patients wince when having a catheter installed and I just can't seem to bring myself round to putting someone through that pain. And as minor as it may sound, it would affect my entire life and career choice if it is indeed an important aspect of being a qualified nurse. I couldn't tolerate it as a care assistant and only allowed to observe but I'm shuddering at the prospect of doing it myself but again t mah be one of those things I will get used to once I've done it a few times. But for now, in relation to the thread, is this something I can avoid or?
    The thing is with skills like that is to acknowledge there will be some minor discomfort for the patient. But that you are doing it in their best interest. believe me, a catheter is far less painful than acute retention of 1000ml. Or how accurate fluid monitoring is vital in a septic patient. If the patient was wincing then perhaps the instilligel wasn't given enough time to work. Or they weren't relaxed because of not enough understanding of the procedure or they're confused.

    Male catheterisation tends to be a rarer thing for a nurse to do, because of additional patient requirements. But if your patient requires one and you are trained, you will be expected to catheterise that patient as part of your duty of care to them.

    Nursing is full of things that people get squeamish about or don't particularly enjoy. But if you want to be a nurse you have to learn to work through this as you have a duty of care to your patient that is far more important.
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    (Original post by uzkhalid2012)
    Hi I'm glad I found this thread. I have a similar question. I'm all for personal care having worked in care with the elderly for 2 years now and counting. I'm considering applying to uni again for adult nursing, I failed my first interview for mental health. The only thing that's putting me off adult nursing is catheterisation. Can someone confirm if learning/applying this in the workforce is an optional module or compulsory. I wouldn't say I'm faint hearted but I do wince each time I've seen patients wince when having a catheter installed and I just can't seem to bring myself round to putting someone through that pain. And as minor as it may sound, it would affect my entire life and career choice if it is indeed an important aspect of being a qualified nurse. I couldn't tolerate it as a care assistant and only allowed to observe but I'm shuddering at the prospect of doing it myself but again t mah be one of those things I will get used to once I've done it a few times. But for now, in relation to the thread, is this something I can avoid or?
    Female catheterisation is a compulsory skill in many universities. When I was studying, by the beginning of my 2nd year I was signed off for both male and female catheterisation. While that's quite unusual as most universities are not yet teaching male catheterisation, it goes to show the direction things are moving in.*

    Unfortunately there are much more painful things we subject patients to, and catheterisation is just one thing on a long list of procedures. Ultimately you may end up working in an area that deals with few catheterisations, but most areas will have some. Should a patient need a catheter, it is very helpful to have a nurse trained to do so on the ward, as ForestCat has explained, it can be very painful for a patient to sit in retention, and having a competent nurse on hand to deal with it is very useful. We don't like to cause pain for no reason - all of the painful procedures we do are for a reason and it is important to stay focused on that.*
    *
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    (Original post by uzkhalid2012)
    Hi I'm glad I found this thread. I have a similar question. I'm all for personal care having worked in care with the elderly for 2 years now and counting. I'm considering applying to uni again for adult nursing, I failed my first interview for mental health. The only thing that's putting me off adult nursing is catheterisation. Can someone confirm if learning/applying this in the workforce is an optional module or compulsory. I wouldn't say I'm faint hearted but I do wince each time I've seen patients wince when having a catheter installed and I just can't seem to bring myself round to putting someone through that pain. And as minor as it may sound, it would affect my entire life and career choice if it is indeed an important aspect of being a qualified nurse. I couldn't tolerate it as a care assistant and only allowed to observe but I'm shuddering at the prospect of doing it myself but again t mah be one of those things I will get used to once I've done it a few times. But for now, in relation to the thread, is this something I can avoid or?
    Urinary catheterisation is a core skill for RNs , some HEIs require you to demonstrate competence with both sexes others are happy for people to have awareness of the procedure for both sexes but only have to demonstrate competence on same sex

    As an aside, there is no real justification for male catheterisation to be an extended role - the issue over it is a hangover from the mid C20th and extrapolation of the issues that are faced in catheterising certain male patients with urology pathologies ...
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    (Original post by uzkhalid2012)
    Hi I'm glad I found this thread. I have a similar question. I'm all for personal care having worked in care with the elderly for 2 years now and counting. I'm considering applying to uni again for adult nursing, I failed my first interview for mental health. The only thing that's putting me off adult nursing is catheterisation. Can someone confirm if learning/applying this in the workforce is an optional module or compulsory. I wouldn't say I'm faint hearted but I do wince each time I've seen patients wince when having a catheter installed and I just can't seem to bring myself round to putting someone through that pain. And as minor as it may sound, it would affect my entire life and career choice if it is indeed an important aspect of being a qualified nurse. I couldn't tolerate it as a care assistant and only allowed to observe but I'm shuddering at the prospect of doing it myself but again t mah be one of those things I will get used to once I've done it a few times. But for now, in relation to the thread, is this something I can avoid or?
    As others have said, think of how your patient may be feeling and the benefit you'll be giving them by catheterising them.

    I wouldn't try to avoid the procedure, in fact, I'd do the opposite and try to get as much exposure as possible.
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    For heaven's sake - you're wanting to train as a nurse but you're 'not good with personal care'. What do you think nursing involves - accountancy?
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    Lol


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    (Original post by Clfrg)
    hello, I'm not great with personal care (or poop).
    Is there anyway to avoid this once qualified mainly the personal care such as morning washes and changes bed etc.
    No. and don't go into it trying to avoid it either. Because it makes very hard work for other members of your team. As a hca, working with an idle nurse is tiring and a nightmare and causes very poor staff morale
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    (Original post by uzkhalid2012)
    Hi I'm glad I found this thread. I have a similar question. I'm all for personal care having worked in care with the elderly for 2 years now and counting. I'm considering applying to uni again for adult nursing, I failed my first interview for mental health. The only thing that's putting me off adult nursing is catheterisation. Can someone confirm if learning/applying this in the workforce is an optional module or compulsory. I wouldn't say I'm faint hearted but I do wince each time I've seen patients wince when having a catheter installed and I just can't seem to bring myself round to putting someone through that pain. And as minor as it may sound, it would affect my entire life and career choice if it is indeed an important aspect of being a qualified nurse. I couldn't tolerate it as a care assistant and only allowed to observe but I'm shuddering at the prospect of doing it myself but again t mah be one of those things I will get used to once I've done it a few times. But for now, in relation to the thread, is this something I can avoid or?
    I'm exactly the same. I'm just over half way through first year and I can stomach everything (I'm proud of that haha) BUT catheters are difficult for me. My stomach does summersaults. It's not so much the female but the male just knocks me sick. But instead of avoiding it I've actually asked to watch to get over it basically. I'm getting a lot better and looking forward to trying it myself one day......something I never would of said 6 months ago!!
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    Wow, just wow.

    Re the catheterisation I totally get that but ive found as ive gone along the course and my knowledge broadened it becomes less about your anxiety and all about the patient and what's best for them if that makes sense
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    This is one of the main reasons why I could never be a nurse lol! I'd say avoid it OP
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    (Original post by uzkhalid2012)
    Hi I'm glad I found this thread. I have a similar question. I'm all for personal care having worked in care with the elderly for 2 years now and counting. I'm considering applying to uni again for adult nursing, I failed my first interview for mental health. The only thing that's putting me off adult nursing is catheterisation. Can someone confirm if learning/applying this in the workforce is an optional module or compulsory. I wouldn't say I'm faint hearted but I do wince each time I've seen patients wince when having a catheter installed and I just can't seem to bring myself round to putting someone through that pain. And as minor as it may sound, it would affect my entire life and career choice if it is indeed an important aspect of being a qualified nurse. I couldn't tolerate it as a care assistant and only allowed to observe but I'm shuddering at the prospect of doing it myself but again t mah be one of those things I will get used to once I've done it a few times. But for now, in relation to the thread, is this something I can avoid or?
    Try having one in okay? fun oh boy is it fun, and yes i have in fact!
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    (Original post by uzkhalid2012)
    Hi I'm glad I found this thread. I have a similar question. I'm all for personal care having worked in care with the elderly for 2 years now and counting. I'm considering applying to uni again for adult nursing, I failed my first interview for mental health. The only thing that's putting me off adult nursing is catheterisation. Can someone confirm if learning/applying this in the workforce is an optional module or compulsory. I wouldn't say I'm faint hearted but I do wince each time I've seen patients wince when having a catheter installed and I just can't seem to bring myself round to putting someone through that pain. And as minor as it may sound, it would affect my entire life and career choice if it is indeed an important aspect of being a qualified nurse. I couldn't tolerate it as a care assistant and only allowed to observe but I'm shuddering at the prospect of doing it myself but again t mah be one of those things I will get used to once I've done it a few times. But for now, in relation to the thread, is this something I can avoid or?
    If you read the thread you will see this has already been answered. No, you can't avoid it. It can be a potentially life saving intervention (bladders can burst in severe cases of retention). It is rarely this severe but catheterisation is an important medical intervention that is always done in the patient's best interests. There is some discomfort for the patient, but you use local anaesthetic lubricant and the discomfort is temporary.
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    (Original post by uzkhalid2012)
    Hi I'm glad I found this thread. I have a similar question. I'm all for personal care having worked in care with the elderly for 2 years now and counting. I'm considering applying to uni again for adult nursing, I failed my first interview for mental health. The only thing that's putting me off adult nursing is catheterisation. Can someone confirm if learning/applying this in the workforce is an optional module or compulsory. I wouldn't say I'm faint hearted but I do wince each time I've seen patients wince when having a catheter installed and I just can't seem to bring myself round to putting someone through that pain. And as minor as it may sound, it would affect my entire life and career choice if it is indeed an important aspect of being a qualified nurse. I couldn't tolerate it as a care assistant and only allowed to observe but I'm shuddering at the prospect of doing it myself but again t mah be one of those things I will get used to once I've done it a few times. But for now, in relation to the thread, is this something I can avoid or?
    This is the exact same post you wrote 2 months ago, the answer hasn't changed.
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    Hiya I don't know why it's resubmitted my original posts. I posted it months ago and received the reply I was after. But came back on today to ask a question elsewhere and it put me through the verification process again and said it would only submit my comments until I've verified. Which is strange as I clearly must have been verified months ago for you all to see it then. So it's reposted it again so do ignore. I'll see if I can delete it. I'm not an active user on this. Maybe that's why it asked me to verify again. And after my today's post I won't be back on again as it was just an interview question I had, so I'm past that question stage as I've gone ahead with it. I'll delete my account after my interviews if I can't delete the posts and to avoid my posts being posted again months later when I return to the site. But do ignore all that above. I'm fine with that now, sorry guys
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    if you see a paitent in agony with retention then your corncern will go. if you fail to do it not only will you damage the bladder but you could harm their kidneys.if your really want to nurse toughen up. their are far worse nursing tasks than personel care.
 
 
 
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