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Not enjoying law degree – advice needed

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    I’m a first year law student, a couple of weeks into the course, and, to my surprise, I’m really not enjoying it. I know legal research,lectures etc. aren’t exactly supposed to be thrilling, but with A levels,despite the work obviously being hard, I was still interested and passionateabout what I was studying. With law, it isn’t like that – trawling throughtextbooks and cases is uninteresting, and I feel like I can’t see myself doingthis for the next few years of my life.

    I didn’t do Law at A level, primarily because of the mixedadvice surrounding it, but I thought I’d done sufficient research regarding thedegree, and never seriously entertained the fact that I wouldn’t immediatelyfall in love with the subject and its intricacies. I looked back at my personal statement in an attempt to see why I (thought I) liked it in the first place,but all I read is rather-vague statements about how trials are intriguing; I’m perhaps interested in the end result of it all, the career itself, but thestudy of it has proven uninteresting.

    At my university there’s a four week period in which you canattempt to transfer courses; after that, it becomes relatively difficult, requiring a leave of absence and re-starting year 1, something I’m not willingto do (I get the minimum loan so I’m relying on my parents’ savings; I can’t afford to do more than three years of studying). So, my time is running out toconsider my options. My dilemma is, essentially, whether or not I shouldtransfer to a politics degree. I loved it at A level, to the extent that I readthe things that were necessary for the exams for fun, out of pure interest, anda politics degree seems genuinely exciting, rather than a tedious chore. But, after being set on becoming a lawyer for the past two years, I would haveabsolutely no idea what to do with a politics degree. It’s obviously lessvocational, perhaps even less respected. Studying it would be enjoyable – I’m certain of that, having taken it at A level (and it was my joint-best subject,as I got an A*) – but it’d leave me stranded with no idea of what to do in life, at all.

    Basically – am I being ridiculous by considering the idea ofrunning away from a Law degree so quickly to a politics degree? Before arrivingI consoled myself with the thought that as I persuaded 5 universities to accept me, one with an interview, I must have a passion for the subject… but now I’m not so sure. Any advice?
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    It is not required nor compulsary to study law as your degree... half of lawyers are non law graduates and choose to study a degree they enjoy first such as politics, history etc. Law firms regard non law graduates to the same extent as law graduates and some even desire it more because you gain more skills from your chosen degree. You do not have to study law, you can study politics and do a conversion course, this is one of the advantages of becoming a lawyer, it is very flexible. I also hope to become a lawyer and i will be studying philosophy and politics.

    http://www.lawsociety.org.uk/law-car...ked-questions/

    Hope this helps
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    (Original post by thefreakoffreaks)
    It is not required nor compulsary to study law as your degree... half of lawyers are non law graduates and choose to study a degree they enjoy first such as politics, history etc. Law firms regard non law graduates to the same extent as law graduates and some even desire it more because you gain more skills from your chosen degree. You do not have to study law, you can study politics and do a conversion course, this is one of the advantages of becoming a lawyer, it is very flexible. I also hope to become a lawyer and i will be studying philosophy and politics.

    http://www.lawsociety.org.uk/law-car...ked-questions/

    Hope this helps
    Thank you. My concern then is that as I'm not particularly enjoying undergrad law, I also wouldn't enjoy the conversion course, as it's the same core modules - that essentially rules out the career as a lawyer, and then I'd have no idea what to do with a politics degree if I switched
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    I was in the same boat as you in my first-year. I did not enjoy my law degree at all, thought the modules were boring and uninspired. Seriously considered dropping out and reapplying for something else.

    But I decided to hang out and see where it went. Second-year got a little easier, I truly enjoyed the optional modules I had taken.

    A bit of advice I got from a friend of mine studying medicine really helped me. She said that she hated the study of medicine, thought it was dry and overly detailed and intense, but the end result was what she was interested in. More importantly, the nature of subjects as dense as Medicine and Law is that not all of it is supposed to be interesting. It is only when you really buckle down and trawl through the pages and pages of boredom do you find the one nugget that makes you go 'hunh' and suddenly, things begin to become interesting.

    I got through my law degree and am now practising and it is a completely different world. Far more interesting, for the most part, and definitely more in line with what I had originally signed up for.

    But like one of the responders above has said, you can always switch and do something else besides law and later convert. Non-law graduates are equally hired as law graudates by law firms and chambers alike. As far as savings go, if you decide to go down the solicitor route and manage to get a training contract at one of the bigger firms, they will shell out the money to put you through the GDL and LPC. Not sure with the Bar, but I believe the Inns of Court have scholarships for this as well.
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    I changed from law because I hated it. The problem you have with suggesting to people that you might change from Law is that everyone sucks through their teeth and goes 'oh, but it's really difficult to get into Law, isn't it?' thereby making you think that it's foolish to 'drop the chance'. However, if it's something you genuinely dislike, then you need to think whether it's something you could seriously study for 3 years - it's not an easy subject, after all.

    That said, Arrowhead's post above makes good points. You sort of have to figure out whether you should give it more time and see if it 'beds in', or whether you should make a decision now and stick with it. I would suggest that you are not unduly pressured into making a decision about your degree and the £27K+ cost of it solely down to your current University's timetable on changing course - if you needed to restart the year then wouldn't that be better, longterm?
 
 
 
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