Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Can I just read it instead of making notes at the same time? I know how to make notes in class, I just don't have much of an idea how to do it with a textbook. I see many people do it, and when I try to, I tend to write ten times more than what is said on the textbook. Not to mention, it's so boring trying to understand and interpret the textbooks' diarrhoea and some of it's complex language. Some help here please?
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Nadiiiaax)
    Can I just read it instead of making notes at the same time? I know how to make notes in class, I just don't have much of an idea how to do it with a textbook. I see many people do it, and when I try to, I tend to write ten times more than what is said on the textbook. Not to mention, it's so boring trying to understand and interpret the textbooks' diarrhoea and it's complex language. Some help here please?
    Depends how best you learn, but just reading it will almost certainly be a bad idea.
    I did that in first year to bad effect.
    In Law, there's simply too much information to just read it.

    Focus on the key points, key cases etc.
    You might take too many at first but in later terms/years you'll learn what's relevant, and how to understand the legalese.
    Presumably you'll have seminar/tutorials to do reading for, and without notes you'll struggle to remember anything to discuss.
    Also - focus on what you've been told to read. My law school used to give us pages to focus on, but also a summary of what we were meant to learn, and key cases. If you cover those, all the better.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    Different people have different ways of doing these things well, but on the whole it's not a great idea to take notes from a law textbook, for precisely the reason you mention, that you end up just copying out and often doing so in a more long-winded way than the book itself. Taking notes as you read also tends to disturb your flow and thus hinder understanding.

    One option, if you're able to buy a copy of your favoured textbook, is to highlight and annotate it. This is a good aid to understanding as you read as well as something to consult when you revise. Don't feel obliged to write anything in particular, just jot things down as they occur to you.
    • Community Assistant
    • PS Reviewer
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Case name. Basic facts. Principle. Distinguished from.

    ^^ Best way to do cases. Make a table for each topic.

    Go to the lecture, read the textbook chapter/extracts you are directed to by the tutors and add key bits to your lecture notes, then finally do the tutorial prep. Only read what you're directed to read.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Estreth)
    Different people have different ways of doing these things well, but on the whole it's not a great idea to take notes from a law textbook, for precisely the reason you mention, that you end up just copying out and often doing so in a more long-winded way than the book itself. Taking notes as you read also tends to disturb your flow and thus hinder understanding.

    One option, if you're able to buy a copy of your favoured textbook, is to highlight and annotate it. This is a good aid to understanding as you read as well as something to consult when you revise. Don't feel obliged to write anything in particular, just jot things down as they occur to you.
    Hmm ok, I was asked to read the introduction of my course just to understand the basics of it, so would jotting things down be worth it?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    sleep with ur teacher
    • Very Important Poster
    Offline

    19
    Thats why you go to lectures.
    Then as above I would read it but highlight as i was going through it. I would then read it again and start making notes from there.
    If I had lecture notes then I would be adding to those.
    If I had any discretion then I would get a textbook that suited me (simpleton version).
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Nadiiiaax)
    Hmm ok, I was asked to read the introduction of my course just to understand the basics of it, so would jotting things down be worth it?
    What do you mean by 'the introduction of my course'? I don't really understand what you're getting at here.

    By the way, you should definitely make notes on cases, even if if you don't take notes on the textbook.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Should Spain allow Catalonia to declare independence?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.