If in a biology textbook.... Watch

rambapa
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....written in the english language it says, "this process is called photosynthesis", does that mean the process is called photosynthesis in the english language and something different in other languages? Do you need to know the english name because science is published in english 99% of the time?

Also why don't they write, "this process is called photosynthesis in english", if they mean the process is called photosynthesis in english. Why do they write, "this process is called photosynthesis" instead.
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rambapa
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UWS
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Well, because the textbook is written in English, they don't need to confirm that the word is in English.
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rambapa
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(Original post by UWS)
Well, because the textbook is written in English, they don't need to confirm that the word is in English.
So we assume they are telling us what the process is called in english, right?
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Doonesbury
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(Original post by rambapa)
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Please don't bump posts.
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Rhaenys10
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...wtf is this thread
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rambapa
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(Original post by jneill)
Please don't bump posts.
sorry
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UWS
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(Original post by rambapa)
So we assume they are telling us what the process is called in english, right?
I don't think people assume what language it's in either, they usually just know. It's an English textbook, written for schools in England, where lessons are taught in English (except languages) so it's not going to be in any other language.

Unless it's a latin word, you would normally only need to know the English translation of the word, which they would tell you anyway.
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rambapa
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(Original post by UWS)
I don't think people assume what language it's in either, they usually just know. It's an English textbook, written for schools in England, where lessons are taught in English (except languages) so it's not going to be in any other language.

Unless it's a latin word, you would normally only need to know the English translation of the word, which they would tell you anyway.
But doesn't it require an assumption?

There is more than one language in the world, and you are telling me what something is called. So either every language calls it that or only english calls it that, you have to assume, right?
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UWS
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(Original post by rambapa)
But doesn't it require an assumption?

There is more than one language in the world, and you are telling me what something is called. So either every language calls it that or only english calls it that, you have to assume, right?
I think you are missing the point. The book is not written in other languages in the world. It is written in English, so you know that the book is going to be entirely in English. Sure, other countries may use different words for the same word, but that's not relevant because you're using an English textbook, so that's the word you should be using.
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rambapa
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(Original post by Rhaenys10)
...wtf is this thread
Read the question
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rambapa
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(Original post by UWS)
I think you are missing the point. The book is not written in other languages in the world. It is written in English, so you know that the book is going to be entirely in English. Sure, other countries may use different words for the same word, but that's not relevant because you're using an English textbook, so that's the word you should be using.
So let me get this straight....

1) You assume it's the english name, since the book is in english. The process is called most likely something different in other languages.

2) You need to know the english name, since the majority of science is written in english. Scientific journals aren't published in arabic or hebrew very much etc.
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(Original post by rambapa)
But doesn't it require an assumption?

There is more than one language in the world, and you are telling me what something is called. So either every language calls it that or only english calls it that, you have to assume, right?
A biology textbook written in French isn't going to say; the word in French is X, in English it's Y, in Urdu it's Z... It will simply use the word "photosynthèse" - i.e the word in French.

Why do you expect a textbook in English to caveat (that's Latin by the way) every technical word by saying this is what the word is in English but it might be different in other languages? It would have to that for every single word...

If you are sitting your Biology exam in a language other than English you will need to know the technical words in your own language.

Google Translate will give you the word in other languages.
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(Original post by rambapa)
So let me get this straight....

1) You assume it's the english name, since the book is in english. The process is called most likely something different in other languages.
Yes.

It's still irrelevant what it's called in other languages, though.

(Original post by rambapa)

2) You need to know the english name, since the majority of science is written in english. Scientific journals aren't published in arabic or hebrew very much etc.
Yes. You learn the terminology they give you, which would be in English.
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rambapa
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(Original post by jneill)
A biology textbook written in French isn't going to say; the word in French is X, in English it's Y, in Urdu it's Z... It will simply use the word "photosynthèse" - i.e the word in French.

Why do you expect a textbook in English to caveat (that's Latin by the way) every technical word by saying this is what the word is in English but it might be different in other languages? It would have to that for every single word...

If you are sitting your Biology exam in a language other than English you will need to know the technical words in your own language.

Google Translate will give you the word in other languages.
Ok great, that helps a lot....

So let me get this straight....

1) You assume it's the english name, since the book is in english. The process is called most likely something different in other languages.

2) You need to know the english name, since the majority of science is written in english. Scientific journals aren't published in arabic or hebrew very much etc.
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rambapa
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(Original post by UWS)
Yes.

It's still irrelevant what it's called in other languages, though.



Yes. You learn the terminology they give you, which would be in English.

But does everyone in the world learn the english name, given science being written in english 99% of the time?
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UWS
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(Original post by rambapa)
But does everyone in the world learn the english name, given science being written in english 99% of the time?
Other languages will have the translations in their language. They will use what is taught to them.
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