What ethical issues does the middlemist, et al. 1976 study raise?

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username2864572
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What ethical issues does the middlemist, et al. 1976 study raise?
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gdunne42
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(Original post by Mariah Del Ray)
What ethical issues does the middlemist, et al. 1976 study raise?
TSR isn't really a service to get your homework done. If you want to make the most of the discussion forums you really need to make more effort or I doubt you will get many responses.
So, do a bit of reading from your text book or do a Google search of the topic first. Then you can post your question but add.........
"I was thinking blah blah blah and blah blah blah because ............
Does anybody have any other ideas ?"
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username2864572
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(Original post by Mariah Del Ray)
What ethical issues does the middlemist, et al. 1976 study raise?
I never said it was did i? And im not asking for anyone to do my homework! Im doing a presentation on which the question above is the last slide and there isnt much online about the study so i thought tsr could help but obviously not😑. Thank you very much.
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gdunne42
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(Original post by Mariah Del Ray)
I never said it was did i? And im not asking for anyone to do my homework! Im doing a presentation on which the question above is the last slide and there isnt much online about the study so i thought tsr could help but obviously not😑. Thank you very much.
I wasnt having a go so I'm sorry you have taken it that way. I was trying to suggest how you might start a discussion that encourages people on TSR to participate. Posting in the way you initially did looks exactly like you want people to do the work for you. If you had said what you did above then people might be interested to get involved.



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Apologies for resurfacing a 4 years old thread, but I have just started learning about ethics and have the same question.

I was thinking that the ethical issue may be protection from harm? Because the participant may have experiences of short term psychological effects of discomfort?

Or, perhaps, the ethical issue is that there is a lack of privacy? As the participant is unaware that they are taking part in a study, so had no decision as to who would or wouldn't know personal information about them?
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ehj5
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(Original post by Anonymous -)
Apologies for resurfacing a 4 years old threIfad, but I have just started learning about ethics and have the same question.

I was thinking that the ethical issue may be protection from harm? Because the participant may have experiences of short term psychological effects of discomfort?

Or, perhaps, the ethical issue is that there is a lack of privacy? As the participant is unaware that they are taking part in a study, so had no decision as to who would or wouldn't know personal information about them?
If they're unaware that they are being studied, lack of informed consent would definetly be a major ethical issue
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(Original post by ehj5)
If they're unaware that they are being studied, lack of informed consent would definetly be a major ethical issue
Ohh ok, thank you - that makes sense.

I also have to answer the question of whether this issue is significant or not...
I was thinking that this is a significant issue because the participant would want to know what they are letting themselves in for and what any possible risks of the study/experiment may be. As this is an experiment which could be a cause for discomfort and is rather invasive, it is necessary for the participant to be aware of this?

Either that, or the issue is not significant due to the fact that if the researcher provided comprehensive information, it could influence the participant's behaviour and reduce the meaningfulness of the research?
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(Original post by Anonymous -)
Ohh ok, thank you - that makes sense.

I also have to answer the question of whether this issue is significant or not...
I was thinking that this is a significant issue because the participant would want to know what they are letting themselves in for and what any possible risks of the study/experiment may be. As this is an experiment which could be a cause for discomfort and is rather invasive, it is necessary for the participant to be aware of this?

Either that, or the issue is not significant due to the fact that if the researcher provided comprehensive information, it could influence the participant's behaviour and reduce the meaningfulness of the research?
i would say it's very significant since it would decide whether the ppt would actually agree or not to take part in the experiment. however of course it could lead to e.g demand characteristics like you said. you could mention that one way to go about it is not gain consent before hand, but do a debrief after the experiment and only use the results if the ppt consents then.
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(Original post by ehj5)
i would say it's very significant since it would decide whether the ppt would actually agree or not to take part in the experiment. however of course it could lead to e.g demand characteristics like you said. you could mention that one way to go about it is not gain consent before hand, but do a debrief after the experiment and only use the results if the ppt consents then.
Ok, that makes sense - thank you!

I don't think that we need to provide a solution for this, and that we just need to state whether the issue is significant or not and why (as we haven't got as far as ways of dealing with issues yet). In this case, would it be significant as it could cause psychological harm to the participant as they may feel uncomfortable or embarrassed, maybe?

If there wasn't this discomfort, and it was an experiment to do with recall of words for example, informed consent would not be a significant issue?
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(Original post by Anonymous -)
Ok, that makes sense - thank you!

I don't think that we need to provide a solution for this, and that we just need to state whether the issue is significant or not and why (as we haven't got as far as ways of dealing with issues yet). In this case, would it be significant as it could cause psychological harm to the participant as they may feel uncomfortable or embarrassed, maybe?

If there wasn't this discomfort, and it was an experiment to do with recall of words for example, informed consent would not be a significant issue?
yes, definetly, it would be a much more significant issue if it has a possibility of causing harm than if it was like you said, recalling words.
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(Original post by ehj5)
yes, definetly, it would be a much more significant issue if it has a possibility of causing harm than if it was like you said, recalling words.
Ok, thank you ever so much for your help . I really appreciate it
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(Original post by Anonymous -)
Ok, thank you ever so much for your help . I really appreciate it
no worries happy to help
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