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ADHD- How has it affected your education? Watch

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    I've been seeking diagnosis for ADHD-Inattentive Type, for about 2 years. Having been spat out the system a couple of times (apparently trying to play down your mental health issues to the people you're seeing for those issues means they kind of par you off), I'm pursuing through Adult Mental Health services rather than CAMHS.

    I'm interested in peoples experiences with diagnosis at an older age, how it's affected their learning (as it has mine significantly) and what you do to overcome it (meds or technoques)

    Cheers
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    (Original post by connormorrison)
    I've been seeking diagnosis for ADHD-Inattentive Type, for about 2 years. Having been spat out the system a couple of times (apparently trying to play down your mental health issues to the people you're seeing for those issues means they kind of par you off), I'm pursuing through Adult Mental Health services rather than CAMHS.

    I'm interested in peoples experiences with diagnosis at an older age, how it's affected their learning (as it has mine significantly) and what you do to overcome it (meds or technoques)

    Cheers
    I was diagnosed with ADD at 17. It's hard to say how it's affected me especially since I was diagnosed with dyslexia at the same time so it's hard to tell.

    I think socially it could explain why i'm a bit different to others. I don't quite naturally get conversations in groups and often will only hear one person so I can interupt and get confused sometimes. I didn't really have any friends between years 4 and 10 cos I just never made any after my old ones moved school.

    I'll also zone out a lot or make odd links so I lost focus in lessons just as I do in conversation. It didn't have too much of an impact and I still did pretty well in school. Looking back the most obvious indicator is all my teachers calling me "a sweet little girl" or simmilar on reports cos they just didn't have anything else to say about me bad or good.

    Around GCSE is where things started getting harder. I think as independant work and revision became more important my lack of focus and motivation became more of an issue. I still didn't pick up on it until college though. I realise now that I never did any homework and teachers just let me get away with it cos I was still getting the grades and always had an excuse (I viseted family in hospital for a while).

    Uni was a nightmare and I left for a vaiety of reasons, but my ADD was clearly a factor. I can never get down to doing anything, especially reading. Even if i'm actually reading something I just don't take it in. I work a lot better with a practical input and I think that my teachers talking and showing videos (and putting up with relentless questions) is why i've been able to come as far as I have.

    I had mh issues at the same time of all of this and i think its part of what triggered all of it. When I saw an educational psychologist though they didn't talk much about that and looked into my childhood and gave me some tests. It might actually help you to try CAMHS if you are the right age as they deal quite a bit with special needs and may have a better understanding of the relationship between special needs and mh issues.

    Hope that is something like what you were looking for and good luck working everything out. One last note- look into DSA if you haven't already. You can claim it for both mh problems and special needs so you don't have to wait for the ADHD stuff to work itself out to apply.
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    (Original post by Kindred)
    I was diagnosed with ADD at 17. It's hard to say how it's affected me especially since I was diagnosed with dyslexia at the same time so it's hard to tell.

    I think socially it could explain why i'm a bit different to others. I don't quite naturally get conversations in groups and often will only hear one person so I can interupt and get confused sometimes. I didn't really have any friends between years 4 and 10 cos I just never made any after my old ones moved school.

    I'll also zone out a lot or make odd links so I lost focus in lessons just as I do in conversation. It didn't have too much of an impact and I still did pretty well in school. Looking back the most obvious indicator is all my teachers calling me "a sweet little girl" or simmilar on reports cos they just didn't have anything else to say about me bad or good.

    Around GCSE is where things started getting harder. I think as independant work and revision became more important my lack of focus and motivation became more of an issue. I still didn't pick up on it until college though. I realise now that I never did any homework and teachers just let me get away with it cos I was still getting the grades and always had an excuse (I viseted family in hospital for a while).

    Uni was a nightmare and I left for a vaiety of reasons, but my ADD was clearly a factor. I can never get down to doing anything, especially reading. Even if i'm actually reading something I just don't take it in. I work a lot better with a practical input and I think that my teachers talking and showing videos (and putting up with relentless questions) is why i've been able to come as far as I have.

    I had mh issues at the same time of all of this and i think its part of what triggered all of it. When I saw an educational psychologist though they didn't talk much about that and looked into my childhood and gave me some tests. It might actually help you to try CAMHS if you are the right age as they deal quite a bit with special needs and may have a better understanding of the relationship between special needs and mh issues.

    Hope that is something like what you were looking for and good luck working everything out. One last note- look into DSA if you haven't already. You can claim it for both mh problems and special needs so you don't have to wait for the ADHD stuff to work itself out to apply.
    I think I may have adhd/add or something along those lines but I'm 25 and I'm really not sure that there'd be any benefit from achieving a diagnosis at this stage?

    But I found your story interesting and helpful in a way thanks
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    (Original post by Little Popcorns)
    I think I may have adhd/add or something along those lines but I'm 25 and I'm really not sure that there'd be any benefit from achieving a diagnosis at this stage?

    But I found your story interesting and helpful in a way thanks
    At 25 the reason would only be if it's bothering you and you want better advice, medication or the extra support that you may be able to get at work (like if you were to need an allowance made to help you). This usually doesn't apply to people since they don't want meds, can get advice online and most likely wouldn't recieve any extra support or require any.

    A diagnosis could help you if you want that support and there's no harm in it, but it's also not necessary. I would suggest you look up advice on adult ADD/ ADHD online though. I found it helpful.
    I got a diagnosis since I was having difficulty at uni and in education DSA can be a real help. Also because I have difficulty reading due to dyslexia so needed a diagnosis for help with that. A lot of what helped my with my ADD though was just understanding what it was and that it makes sense I don't respond to things as others do.
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    (Original post by Kindred)
    At 25 the reason would only be if it's bothering you and you want better advice, medication or the extra support that you may be able to get at work (like if you were to need an allowance made to help you). This usually doesn't apply to people since they don't want meds, can get advice online and most likely wouldn't recieve any extra support or require any.

    A diagnosis could help you if you want that support and there's no harm in it, but it's also not necessary. I would suggest you look up advice on adult ADD/ ADHD online though. I found it helpful.
    I got a diagnosis since I was having difficulty at uni and in education DSA can be a real help. Also because I have difficulty reading due to dyslexia so needed a diagnosis for help with that. A lot of what helped my with my ADD though was just understanding what it was and that it makes sense I don't respond to things as others do.
    Yeah I think with me I have a fair few other problems at the moment that we're trying to get to the bottom of so will see where all of that goes. I will need help in any setting really, if I can get to the stage of work etc, as in if the problems don't hold me back so much that I'm not able to make further progress.

    If I got back into education DSA would definitely be of help so yeah something to consider.

    For me I think (the potential) ADHD gives me this sense of frustration where I know what I plan to do but the execution is a mess unless I have very specific set of circumstances to facilitate it. If I have the circumstances the thing can be great but otherwise it can go full speed in the other direction...completely down the pan or I have to give up due to my confidence being zero. So a few issues overlapping as I too have other MH stuff to grapple with.
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    it had a negative impact.

    Teachers did not understand why the struggle was real for me when everyone else seemed to cope fine
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    (Original post by Kindred)
    At 25 the reason would only be if it's bothering you and you want better advice, medication or the extra support that you may be able to get at work (like if you were to need an allowance made to help you). This usually doesn't apply to people since they don't want meds, can get advice online and most likely wouldn't recieve any extra support or require any.

    A diagnosis could help you if you want that support and there's no harm in it, but it's also not necessary. I would suggest you look up advice on adult ADD/ ADHD online though. I found it helpful.
    I got a diagnosis since I was having difficulty at uni and in education DSA can be a real help. Also because I have difficulty reading due to dyslexia so needed a diagnosis for help with that. A lot of what helped my with my ADD though was just understanding what it was and that it makes sense I don't respond to things as others do.
    Out of interest, how did you get diagnosed with ADHD/ADD?
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    It has affected my whole life. It can be an insidious condition.

    Diagnosed this year.
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    (Original post by Little Popcorns)
    I think I may have adhd/add or something along those lines but I'm 25 and I'm really not sure that there'd be any benefit from achieving a diagnosis at this stage?

    But I found your story interesting and helpful in a way thanks

    Trust me. There will be benefit from gaining a diagnosis at any age.

    Obviously the later you leave it the more regrets and missed opportunities you may have.
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    (Original post by Blackstarr)
    Out of interest, how did you get diagnosed with ADHD/ADD?
    I was seeing a psychiatrist for mh problems and it kinda came up that I had symptoms so he sent me to an educational psych. Only other time I came close is when my school said I had "memory problems" and sent me to some memory person in school who did memory exercises with me in which I did well. Never really occured to anybody that I wasn't paying attention I guess cos I always looked like I was. They also pegged that I was better at answering questions when yalking to people than on paper but that never lead to anything.

    But yeah educational psych. They basically just asked me a bunch of questions about when I was a kid and how I was doing at uni and stuff and did a couple of tests with me where I had to rearrange things to make other things and stuff like that. I'm not sure which bits were for testing what problems, but after that I was told I had dyslexia and ADD.
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    (Original post by Little Popcorns)
    Yeah I think with me I have a fair few other problems at the moment that we're trying to get to the bottom of so will see where all of that goes. I will need help in any setting really, if I can get to the stage of work etc, as in if the problems don't hold me back so much that I'm not able to make further progress.

    If I got back into education DSA would definitely be of help so yeah something to consider.

    For me I think (the potential) ADHD gives me this sense of frustration where I know what I plan to do but the execution is a mess unless I have very specific set of circumstances to facilitate it. If I have the circumstances the thing can be great but otherwise it can go full speed in the other direction...completely down the pan or I have to give up due to my confidence being zero. So a few issues overlapping as I too have other MH stuff to grapple with.
    I don't blame you for wanting to hold off. I don't think i'd have got anywhere if my psych didn't refer me. Definately worth doing if you're going back into education though yeah.
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    (Original post by Kindred)
    I don't blame you for wanting to hold off. I don't think i'd have got anywhere if my psych didn't refer me. Definately worth doing if you're going back into education though yeah.
    (Original post by stefano865)
    Trust me. There will be benefit from gaining a diagnosis at any age.

    Obviously the later you leave it the more regrets and missed opportunities you may have.
    You're probably both right tbh will see how I get on... But I can't stop thinking about the stigma attached to it... people thinking you're either just not trying hard enough or you're dumb or... that the problem doesn't even exist as an impediment/condition? But yeah...
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    (Original post by Little Popcorns)
    You're probably both right tbh will see how I get on... But I can't stop thinking about the stigma attached to it... people thinking you're either just not trying hard enough or you're dumb or... that the problem doesn't even exist as an impediment/condition? But yeah...

    I'm guessing you would be ADHD PI?

    Most people diagnosed as adults are. They tend to slip under the radar.
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    (Original post by Kindred)

    Uni was a nightmare and I left for a vaiety of reasons, but my ADD was clearly a factor. I can never get down to doing anything, especially reading. Even if i'm actually reading something I just don't take it in. I work a lot better with a practical input and I think that my teachers talking and showing videos (and putting up with relentless questions) is why i've been able to come as far as I have.

    Yup uni was impossible for me too.

    I left because it became clear that things just weren't right. I seemed to struggle so much with day to day life for no logical reason.

    In the end the problems built up to such an extent that i started looking for answers.

    Christ was I relieved to have that diagnosis.
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    (Original post by stefano865)
    I'm guessing you would be ADHD PI?

    Most people diagnosed as adults are. They tend to slip under the radar.
    I want to say yes because it's less embarrasing but there are times when there's a fair bit of hyperactivity going on, I figet a lot and sometimes dart about like a bit of a goon but because I have anxiety it's difficult to know whether that's partly to blame...

    How about you?
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    (Original post by Little Popcorns)
    I want to say yes because it's less embarrasing but there are times when there's a fair bit of hyperactivity going on, I figet a lot and sometimes dart about like a bit of a goon but because I have anxiety it's difficult to know whether that's partly to blame...

    How about you?

    ADHD PI but with some clear hyperactive traits too.

    Probably evident from my posts.

    I think anxiety, obsessive behaviour and MH problems are all part of the package. Especially for those who have not been diagnosed.
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    (Original post by stefano865)
    ADHD PI but with some clear hyperactive traits too.

    Probably evident from my posts.

    I think anxiety, obsessive behaviour and MH problems are all part of the package. Especially for those who have not been diagnosed.
    Think the possibility that I have it is probably evident from my behaviour on here too...

    Yep think that's probably true!
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    (Original post by Little Popcorns)
    Think the possibility that I have it is probably evident from my behaviour on here too...

    Yep think that's probably true!

    I've done a lot of reading.

    Will PM some articles later if you like LP?
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    (Original post by stefano865)
    I've done a lot of reading.

    Will PM some articles later if you like LP?
    Yeah feel free to
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    (Original post by Little Popcorns)
    You're probably both right tbh will see how I get on... But I can't stop thinking about the stigma attached to it... people thinking you're either just not trying hard enough or you're dumb or... that the problem doesn't even exist as an impediment/condition? But yeah...
    You ca choose who knows though. I don't tell many people. Anybody I have told though has been fine with it. I've had no negative experiences from telling people. I wouldn't let stigma be the reason you don't get answers.
 
 
 
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