Job Prospects for Computer Science graduates e.g. working at GOOGLE/AMAZON

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    I was wondering how one would get a job/internship at a top company like Goggle and Amazon e.g as a Software engineer. How difficult would it be and what steps does one need to take considering they have at least a 2:1 at a top Russel group uni.

    Also what are some other job prospects for Computer Science graduates? And what sort of experience should one get before getting a proper job at a decent company?

    Thank you.
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    (Original post by Kira Yagami)
    I was wondering how one would get a job/internship at a top company like Goggle and Amazon e.g as a Software engineer. How difficult would it be and what steps does one need to take considering they have at least a 2:1 at a top Russel group uni.

    Also what are some other job prospects for Computer Science graduates? And what sort of experience should one get before getting a proper job at a decent company?

    Thank you.
    Very difficult.

    Usual process is you intern or work on personal projects first before attempting a formal internship application at one of the 'Big-N' (Google, FB, Amazon, Microsoft, Apple etc) {but it's not vital to intern beforehand however it's very much unlikely you'll pass the CV screening without any experience or projects whatsoever.}

    Then, you'd have a phone interview (or 2 or 3) that'll usually be 30-45 minutes - usually consisting of a light technical interview with maybe a few behavioural questions

    Then, an on-site day of multiple technical/white board coding interviews, usually 4-5 hours long in total.

    Sometimes there are more rounds of interviews, sometimes there are pre-interview coding challenges online etc etc. But the key at these companies is to have a strong understanding of Computer Science fundamentals; that means all the info in a typical algorithms and data structures module at uni + big 'O' notation/algorithmic efficiency + complexity etc.. You're tested on how well you can use theory in an applied situation. Do bear in mind that most 'Big-N' type companies receive tens of thousands of CVs for their internship and full time schemes

    Other prospects for a CompSci (ir indeed any STEM degree holder) would be split into technical stuff and non-technical stuff.

    Technical stuff would include:
    Tech department of investment banks, IT department of a general non-technology company (e.g. Sainsburys, BP, Unilever etc), early stage tech startups, late stage tech startups, small to mid sized companies (usually scattered across the UK), tech role within a high frequency trading company/quant hedge fund/prop trading firm, IT consulting firms and IT consulting arms of larger professional services firms (ala deloitte), more stagnant/less rapidly growing large tech companies (IBM, Cisco, ARM etc)..

    Non-technical
    Investment banking, trading, research, finance graduate schemes, management grad schemes, law training contracts/pupillages, marketing, sales etc etc etc

    Basically, the graduate job market is pretty much (70-80%) open to people with any degree so there aren't any barriers apart from how well you put together applications, how well you read up on the job area/company etc and the few jobs that do require specific degree are usually technical/quantitative/scientific jobs or jobs whereby you need a certain degree to be a licenced professional (I.e. engineering, architecture).

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Very difficult.

    Usual process is you intern or work on personal projects first before attempting a formal internship application at one of the 'Big-N' (Google, FB, Amazon, Microsoft, Apple etc) {but it's not vital to intern beforehand however it's very much unlikely you'll pass the CV screening without any experience or projects whatsoever.}

    Then, you'd have a phone interview (or 2 or 3) that'll usually be 30-45 minutes - usually consisting of a light technical interview with maybe a few behavioural questions

    Then, an on-site day of multiple technical/white board coding interviews, usually 4-5 hours long in total.

    Sometimes there are more rounds of interviews, sometimes there are pre-interview coding challenges online etc etc. But the key at these companies is to have a strong understanding of Computer Science fundamentals; that means all the info in a typical algorithms and data structures module at uni + big 'O' notation/algorithmic efficiency + complexity etc.. You're tested on how well you can use theory in an applied situation. Do bear in mind that most 'Big-N' type companies receive tens of thousands of CVs for their internship and full time schemes

    Other prospects for a CompSci (ir indeed any STEM degree holder) would be split into technical stuff and non-technical stuff.

    Technical stuff would include:
    Tech department of investment banks, IT department of a general non-technology company (e.g. Sainsburys, BP, Unilever etc), early stage tech startups, late stage tech startups, small to mid sized companies (usually scattered across the UK), tech role within a high frequency trading company/quant hedge fund/prop trading firm, IT consulting firms and IT consulting arms of larger professional services firms (ala deloitte), more stagnant/less rapidly growing large tech companies (IBM, Cisco, ARM etc)..

    Non-technical
    Investment banking, trading, research, finance graduate schemes, management grad schemes, law training contracts/pupillages, marketing, sales etc etc etc

    Basically, the graduate job market is pretty much (70-80%) open to people with any degree so there aren't any barriers apart from how well you put together applications, how well you read up on the job area/company etc and the few jobs that do require specific degree are usually technical/quantitative/scientific jobs or jobs whereby you need a certain degree to be a licenced professional (I.e. engineering, architecture).

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    Thanks a lot. Just wondering how do you know all this, what do you do exactly?

    Also I will be doing Computer Science next year but I do not do A level computing. Is there anything you advise that I should do to roughly prepare for my first year at uni? (e.g. I was thinking the best thing I should do is learn Java) . I am asking because I am taking a gap year and I need some things to do to prepare me for computer science.

    Thanks a lot!
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    (Original post by Kira Yagami)
    Thanks a lot. Just wondering how do you know all this, what do you do exactly?

    Also I will be doing Computer Science next year but I do not do A level computing. Is there anything you advise that I should do to roughly prepare for my first year at uni? (e.g. I was thinking the best thing I should do is learn Java) . I am asking because I am taking a gap year and I need some things to do to prepare me for computer science.

    Thanks a lot!
    3-4 years of research, talking to people and formulating my personal career guide thing. I do CS, first year atm. Ran a tech company alongside school for a bit too.

    It's not necessary to do computing. I'd just say keep up your problem solving skills, head over to code school/codecademy and start working through the exercises for any language (would recommend Python).

    In your gap year, try to do some personal projects. Like making an app (web or mobile), something that solves a problem.



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