Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I left school in 1994 with decent enough GCSEs to have gone onto college. At the time I chose a work based training programme for an airline that took me all over the world (and gave me free holidays - at 16 this was a no brainer). Anyway... fast forward 22 years later and after a successful career at exec management level and a 8 year break to be a Mum, I want to be a nurse. Something I've wanted to do since I was little. I have a disabled child and have been their full-time mum/carer/personal nurse since birth and truly feel that this has opened my eyes to a different side of medicine. I am in the fortunate position of being able to study full-time, part-time or at distance and am financially set.

    Tell me... How would you move forward? Do I need to do an access court first? Then look to get into a HCA role? Then look to do an adult nursing degree? Should I re-sit GCSEs? Do a-levels? (I don't even know what an as level is). I have read ucas (which was a new thing when I was leaving school) and OU and briefly read a few geographically local uni's requirements and it's a minefield. I know that some uni's allow "life experience" and actively encourage mature students. I know that others really only want you freshly picked young'uns.

    If you were me, what way would you move it forward?

    Thanks...

    A confused Mum
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    Honestly I would choose a few universities you would like to attend and get in touch with the head of department to discuss your experience/qualifications and ask them if you could look at applying immediately or whether you need to take some qualifications/do some work experience first

    have a think about what type of nursing as well... I'd assume your experience is good across the board but will particularly lend you to learning disability nursing which I think you can study specifically
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    Most universities ask for maths English and science (your core gcse's) grade a-c.
    Then if you don't have any a-levels, look at applying to college to do an access course if you have no other qualifications.
    Universities now accept hnc/hnd, nvq / diplomas etc when applying so look at where you want to apply, and email their admissions departments for some more specific advice to your situation.

    A health care assistant role is good for experience but not something you specifically need to apply to nursing. Any volunteering or any role you can then apply the skills from to nursing will help. Including things like your previous job (patience, customer service skills - therefore good personal relations etc etc).
    Doing a Google search for nursing personal statements will give you various results for tips on what people may have wrote previously and what universities may be looking for.
    Do your personal statement and make it personal to you.

    Have a look through the nursing and midwifery forum, there are tips and various threads in each field of nursing and ama's.

    Also have a think about what field you want to apply for and what you think is suited to you. It's 3 years of your life but a whole career so you need to be doing something you enjoy and are suited to.

    Best of luck with everything!

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • TSR Support Team
    • PS Reviewer
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Online

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mumneedshelp)
    I left school in 1994 with decent enough GCSEs to have gone onto college. At the time I chose a work based training programme for an airline that took me all over the world (and gave me free holidays - at 16 this was a no brainer). Anyway... fast forward 22 years later and after a successful career at exec management level and a 8 year break to be a Mum, I want to be a nurse. Something I've wanted to do since I was little. I have a disabled child and have been their full-time mum/carer/personal nurse since birth and truly feel that this has opened my eyes to a different side of medicine. I am in the fortunate position of being able to study full-time, part-time or at distance and am financially set.

    Tell me... How would you move forward? Do I need to do an access court first? Then look to get into a HCA role? Then look to do an adult nursing degree? Should I re-sit GCSEs? Do a-levels? (I don't even know what an as level is). I have read ucas (which was a new thing when I was leaving school) and OU and briefly read a few geographically local uni's requirements and it's a minefield. I know that some uni's allow "life experience" and actively encourage mature students. I know that others really only want you freshly picked young'uns.

    If you were me, what way would you move it forward?

    Thanks...

    A confused Mum
    I've moved your thread over into the Nursing and Midwifery area

    As you have been out of education for quite some time, and looking at your experiences, I would highly recommend an access course. Following completion of that, you can apply straight away to study your degree, there is no need to get a job as a HCA first. You would, however, need to get some work experience or volunteering in the meantime, as this really is essential for your UCAS application.*

    The access course is useful because it brings your sciences up to the level they would need to be to meet the entry requirements, and they also are really good (often better than schools) at preparing you for degree-level study. You need to do independent study, and will also get used to academic writing, for example, which will take a lot of pressure off when you actually start university because you are already used to that style of learning.*

    I hope that this is helpful and clears things up a bit for you, please feel free to quote me if you have any more questions *
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    You would probably need to do an Access course but you already have a lot of experience looking after your child which you can use to good effect. However you were a parent not a nurse to your child so when writing your PS don't fall into that trap and concentrate on how, because of looking after your child, you are very aware of the role of the nurse, 6 C's etc. Any particular reason that you want to do Adult? Have you thought about children's nursing? You know what it's like to be the parent and therefore can show that empathy with other parents when nursing their child.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lilibet01)
    You would probably need to do an Access course but you already have a lot of experience looking after your child which you can use to good effect. However you were a parent not a nurse to your
    Sorry but I have to totally disagree here.
    I am currently in my final year of learning disability nursing and have met some very complex patients and complex families.
    Ever heard of the campaign 'not a nurse but..'?
    Many parents of children with disabilities are trained in many nursing tasks. Especially those parents who have very complex children. They will know how to manage and change tracheostomies. They will know how to manage oxygen. They will know how to administer many different medications, manage PEG tubes. They will know how to change and dress wounds. These parents are not only parents, but nurse these children 24/7.
    And for that they should be given the respect they deserve. Yes, they may not be a trained nurse. But they have a lot of the practical skills that many nurses may not have.
    Any parent can use their skills towards their application and apply it in the context of Nursing, particularly those parents of children with disabilities.
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by deviant182)
    Sorry but I have to totally disagree here.
    I am currently in my final year of learning disability nursing and have met some very complex patients and complex families.
    Ever heard of the campaign 'not a nurse but..'?
    Many parents of children with disabilities are trained in many nursing tasks. Especially those parents who have very complex children. They will know how to manage and change tracheostomies. They will know how to manage oxygen. They will know how to administer many different medications, manage PEG tubes. They will know how to change and dress wounds. These parents are not only parents, but nurse these children 24/7.
    And for that they should be given the respect they deserve. Yes, they may not be a trained nurse. But they have a lot of the practical skills that many nurses may not have.
    Any parent can use their skills towards their application and apply it in the context of Nursing, particularly those parents of children with disabilities.
    I agree, I was one of those parents but the advice that was given to me when I applied was not to confuse being a parent with being a nurse in your PS. I was merely passing that information on.
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    Which incidentally worked for me. The one uni that I gave a lot of information about caring for my very complex child, turned me down. Two other universities who only had my PS to go on, which did mention him, but as a parent, both gave me offers. I am now a qualified nurse working in intensive care.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    How are your GCSEs going so far?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.