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Are people judged by the way they speak? Watch

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    I think we make judgements based on how people talk... Do you think is fair?
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    not really, we judge people by their looks and when they talk we get a real judgement of them and their character.
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    of course they do
    and it is "fair" to some extent - if somebody was to talk as if they were from either essex or newcastle, and they understood how silly it made them sound to 'regular folk', then they'd opt to diminish that accent if they were decent individuals. but some don't...and hence, they're judged accordingly
    I mean, if I understood that sounding slurred and tipsy after drinking was judged on a dialectical basis, yet I still opted to sound slurred after drinking too much because it felt the most comfortable and convenient to me, then how is this any different to the former example?
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    (Original post by sleepysnooze)
    of course they do
    and it is "fair" to some extent - if somebody was to talk as if they were from either essex or newcastle, and they understood how silly it made them sound to 'regular folk', then they'd opt to diminish that accent if they were decent individuals. but some don't...and hence, they're judged accordingly
    I mean, if I understood that sounding slurred and tipsy after drinking was judged on a dialectical basis, yet I still opted to sound slurred after drinking too much because it felt the most comfortable and convenient to me, then how is this any different to the former example?
    I didn't quite understand why do you think that its "fair" to some extent... I ask this question because I need to write an oppinion essay about this topic and I can't find a reason to say that its "fair" to some extent. (Sorry if I had gramatical mistakes)
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    (Original post by mkap)
    not really, we judge people by their looks and when they talk we get a real judgement of them and their character.
    I agree, but I think that sometimes we judge people by their intonation and how low people speak or pronunciation...
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    Regardless of whether it's fair or not, we're going to do it anyway. We all judge others for so many things, even if you don't want to admit it.

    Anyway, yeah, people do get judged by the way they talk. I don't think it's really fair to impose a behaviour in response to the way they talk to the extent that you cause some discomfort. For example, if some chavs came along and you acted differently to them just because of the way they talk, that's not fair, but actually judging them can only be helped a bit, the rest is primal to our human instincts, is it not?
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    (Original post by sleepysnooze)
    of course they do
    and it is "fair" to some extent - if somebody was to talk as if they were from either essex or newcastle, and they understood how silly it made them sound to 'regular folk', then they'd opt to diminish that accent if they were decent individuals. but some don't...and hence, they're judged accordingly
    I don't think choosing not to dial down your accent for the convenience of others is a particularly negative thing. If anything, the people who expect others to do so are bigger ********s than someone bowing down to someone elses' expectations over something as immaterial as an accent.

    I mean, if I understood that sounding slurred and tipsy after drinking was judged on a dialectical basis, yet I still opted to sound slurred after drinking too much because it felt the most comfortable and convenient to me, then how is this any different to the former example?
    It's different because you choose to get drunk. You didn't choose to be born in Essex, to have lived with other people who have certain sounding accents, and for your own accent to reflect that you're a product of your environment.

    I'd much rather someone feel comfortable when speaking to me in their own accent than for them to feel restricted by such, because if they think I'm the sort of person to judge them for intentionally not making their accent similar to mine when talking to me then they're less likely to be as honest with me if they thought they could talk openly, and as such I might be missing out on experiencing their wholeness as a person.
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