Tory Conference

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    As a proud British Asian, I find the "suggestions" made at The Conservative Conference both offensive and outrageous. How do you feel about this issue?
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    (Original post by Alhacen)
    As a proud British Asian, I find the "suggestions" made at The Conservative Conference both offensive and outrageous. How do you feel about this issue?
    As a British Sikh (getting better though) who has voted 'Brexit', UKIP in Euro elections and votes Tory in General and local, I though it was a brilliant conference, only wish I was a card carrying Tory again! I need to see what the Brexit deal is before I join again....
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    (Original post by meenu89)
    As a British Sikh (getting better though) who has voted 'Brexit', UKIP in Euro elections and votes Tory in General and local, I though it was a brilliant conference, only wish I was a card carrying Tory again! I need to see what the Brexit deal is before I join again....
    You obviously have a lot of experience--I, on the other hand, can't even vote for the next four years. But, didn't you find it racist? Do you think all the public disquiet isn't justified? I'm sorry if I sound offensive.
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    (Original post by Alhacen)
    You obviously have a lot of experience--I, on the other hand, can't even vote for the next four years. But, didn't you find it racist? Do you think all the public disquiet isn't justified? I'm sorry if I sound offensive.
    A lot of what was said was in tune with what much of the country thinks outside London.

    I do have sympathy for the immigrants that have done well, move to the home counties but when you see places like Bradford then it's no suprise that there's a lot of negative sentiment.

    It may be that your a patriot who is loyal only to Britain in which case a lot of the hate is probably unfounded but there are a horde of apologists and people who don't make any effort.
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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    A lot of what was said was in tune with what much of the country thinks outside London.

    I do have sympathy for the immigrants that have done well, move to the home counties and do attend the village fate and perhaps get a glass of orange juice in the pub with their native friends but when you see places like Bradford then it's no suprise that there's a lot of negative sentiment.

    It may be that your a patriot who is loyal only to Britain in which case a lot of the hate is probably unfounded but there are a horde of apologists and people who don't make any effort.
    Does visiting the local pub make one "more" British? I, for one, believe that a Pakistani-born, Eid-celebrating, bearded man that works hard for the country is just as British as your pub-going Tom, Dick and Harry. And what's happening in Bradford that justifies racism? Again, I'm sorry if I offended someone.
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    (Original post by Alhacen)
    Does visiting the local pub make one "more" British? I, for one, believe that a Pakistani-born, Eid-celebrating, bearded man that works hard for the country is just as British as your pub-going Tom, Dick and Harry. And what's happening in Bradford that justifies racism? Again, I'm sorry if I offended someone.
    My wider point was that people don't mind immigrants integrating in their communities and making friends ect.. what they don't want to see is a situation like Bradford where you've formed your own communities that don't feel British.
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    (Original post by Alhacen)
    Does visiting the local pub make one "more" British?
    Yes - it absolutely does.


    I, for one, believe that a Pakistani-born, Eid-celebrating, bearded man that works hard for the country is just as British as your pub-going Tom, Dick and Harry.
    Then you're wrong. I'm not suggesting for a second that such a person is inferior, or second-class. But they are not plugged into the social and cultural structure of Britain. Holding a passport and being a subject makes you British on paper - but there's more to it than that.

    There's only any debate about this because it's Britain. For any other country - it would be absolutely clear. If I move to Spain, become a citizen, but I keep my accent, associate only with ex-Pats, only speak English, only eat imported English food - how can I pretend to be anything other than a Brit living abroad, regardless of my legal status?

    No-one gives a monkeys about Eid or beards or Pakistan. The problem you have is that you think there is such a thing as "pub-going Tom, Dick and Harry". That's the problem. It's you.
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    People have a right to be seriously concerned about the labelling of "foreigners" in workplaces and in schools. While there is nothing wrong with a state arguing that they want maximum British employment before hiring migrant labour, the new policies will serve to deepen divides. British born people who "look foreign" might notice a bit more hostility towards them now that the Tories have legitimatised the view expressed by the far-right.
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    (Original post by Trinculo)
    Then you're wrong. I'm not suggesting for a second that such a person is inferior, or second-class. But they are not plugged into the social and cultural structure of Britain. Holding a passport and being a subject makes you British on paper - but there's more to it than that.
    That person identifies as British. A hyphenated Brit, but a Brit nonetheless.
    (Original post by Trinculo)
    The problem you have is that you think there is such a thing as "pub-going Tom, Dick and Harry". That's the problem. It's you.
    Touché. I apologize for the gross generalization.
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    (Original post by Alhacen)
    That person identifies as British. A hyphenated Brit, but a Brit nonetheless.
    Is this not one of those awful 21st century tropes, though? Where identifying as something makes it real? If the person is a British subject - they're British - end of. There's no need to identify as that same thing. The issue is that they're one thing as a legal status, but possibly another by their actions.



    Touché. I apologize for the gross generalization.
    Really no need.
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    (Original post by Trinculo)
    Is this not one of those awful 21st century tropes
    Hating on immigrants, is that not one of those awful 17th century tropes?
 
 
 
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