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Homeopathy Watch

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    Why are the NHS still funding it?


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    (Original post by dingleberry jam)
    Why are the NHS still funding it?


    @L i b

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    Homeopathy's alright. It's better than drugs, which slow down the problem, whereas homeopathy speeds up what's wrong, so that it heals quicker. Not funded by the NHS. They don't agree with homeopathy.
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    The only valid use of homeopathy in human beings is for the placebo effect, which can be pretty powerful. I have a problem with homeopathy being used in veterinary care, where the placebo effect is, obviously, unavailable. It's akin to animal cruelty to wave crystals over some poor animal that's suffering rather than give it proper, evidence-based western medical care.
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    (Original post by Mvine001)
    Homeopathy's alright. It's better than drugs, which slow down the problem, whereas homeopathy speeds up what's wrong, so that it heals quicker.
    hmmm k:loony:

    (Original post by Mvine001)
    Not funded by the NHS. They don't agree with homeopathy.
    It does.

    http://goodthinkingsociety.org/proje...athy-spending/
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    Very few practitioners agree with homeopathy. So technically, the NHS doesn't like homeopathy. The few who do support homeopathy say that they have seen it get rid of diseases such as malaria.
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    (Original post by Reality Check)
    The only valid use of homeopathy in human beings is for the placebo effect,
    Not sure it is, some placebos work better than others, injections are better than sugar cubes and we can do it cheaper than homeopathy.

    (Original post by Reality Check)
    I have a problem with homeopathy being used in veterinary care, where the placebo effect is, obviously, unavailable. .
    You sure on that?
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    (Original post by Mvine001)
    Very few practitioners agree with homeopathy. So technically, the NHS doesn't like homeopathy. The few who do support homeopathy say that they have seen it get rid of diseases such as malaria.
    Yet they still spend around £5m a year on it.
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    (Original post by dingleberry jam)
    Yet they still spend around £5m a year on it.
    Might ask my homeopath this evening.
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    (Original post by Mvine001)
    The few who do support homeopathy say that they have seen it get rid of diseases such as malaria.
    They are wrong.
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    (Original post by Gofre)
    They are wrong.
    Do you have proof
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    (Original post by Mvine001)
    Do you have proof
    Burden of proof is on you fam

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    (Original post by RobML)
    Burden of proof is on you fam

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    I have had homeopathy done for 15 years. It has stopped my asthma, flu, it's sorted out my emotions about things and more. This is more than proof. It's evidence. I know what I'm talking about. Don't try and say that I'm making this up, because I'm not.
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    (Original post by dingleberry jam)
    Yet they still spend around £5m a year on it.
    Tbf that is a very small amount compared to the NHS' overall spending
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    (Original post by Mvine001)
    Do you have proof
    Conclusive studies performed by both government backed and independent researchers finding success rates of homeopathy are no higher than the placebo effect.

    (Original post by The NHS)
    A 2010 House of Commons Science and Technology Committee report on homeopathy said that homeopathic remedies perform no better than placebos, and that the principles on which homeopathy is based are "scientifically implausible".
    http://www.publications.parliament.u...ch/45/4502.htm

    https://www.nhmrc.gov.au/_files_nhmr...ion_paper.pdf?
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    Homeopathy? Might as well just drink water :rofl:
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    (Original post by Inexorably)
    Tbf that is a very small amount compared to the NHS' overall spending
    It's a good 1000 cycles of IVF.
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    (Original post by Reality Check)
    The only valid use of homeopathy in human beings is for the placebo effect, which can be pretty powerful. I have a problem with homeopathy being used in veterinary care, where the placebo effect is, obviously, unavailable. It's akin to animal cruelty to wave crystals over some poor animal that's suffering rather than give it proper, evidence-based western medical care.
    Are you sure animals don't react to the Placebo Effect? I wouldn't call it cruelty too. Sure, we can give them evidence-based help, but not to is not cruelty; actively causing harm is, e.g. poisoning.

    Homeopathy's not supported. Some money does go towards it, simply to regulate its practice and hold it to a professional standard. As a patient is essentially autonomous, standardising alternatives is only just. I mean if we didn't, any crackpot could hand out their version of homeopathy.

    That's what I think

    G
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    (Original post by G.name)
    Are you sure animals don't react to the Placebo Effect? I wouldn't call it cruelty too. Sure, we can give them evidence-based help, but not to is not cruelty; actively causing harm is, e.g. poisoning.
    I would argue that withholding proven treatments in favour of known unproven/disproven treatments would constitute as a form of cruelty, not on the same grade as actively abusing but it's still causing harm as a direct result of the person's actions as a consequence of leaving them untreated.

    I mean if we didn't, any crackpot could hand out their version of homeopathy.
    They pretty much can;

    (Original post by The NHS)
    There is no legal regulation of homeopathic practitioners in the UK. This means that anyone can practise as a homeopath, even if they have no qualifications or experience.
    Voluntary regulation aims to protect patient safety, but it does not mean that there is scientific evidence that a treatment is effective.
    http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/homeopa...aspx#when-used
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    It seems to be an expensive placebo effect. The bits of homeopathy that did turn out to have an effect beyond that became recognised medicine, like asprin.

    I know plenty of people who use things like arnica (I'm not sure how it's meant to be written) and claim that it works, but my brother used to claim that he felt better after bumping his head when we gave him a tic tac, so I'd take anybody's testimony with a pinch of salt.

    Incidentally, is there a ''cynical'' smiley at all?
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    it is powerful ju-ju

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