Angelin Ravi
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How do you do this please explain!!!
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Angelin Ravi
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(Original post by Maker)
Haven't you been taught any chemistry?
Yes I have been taught a lot of chemistry just wanted to know how you do the ionic equation part. If you don't want to help then please don't.
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everythingice
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Mg (s) + CuSO4 (aq) -> Cu (s) + MgSO4(aq)

That's the actual equation, where Magnesium displaces Copper due to it being more reactive.

For the ionic equation you'd have to look at the individual equations of each of the metals. As it's Copper (II), that means it has a charge of 2+. So as it's having electrons given to it, it's being REDUCED:

Cu2+ + 2e- -> Cu

Then the Magnesium initially has a charge of 0 but then when it displaces copper, it gains a charge of 2+. Therefore it's having electrons removed, meaning it's OXIDISED.

Mg -> Mg2+ +2e-

Hope that helped!
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Raizelcadres
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(Original post by Angelin Ravi)
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How do you do this please explain!!!
Please only give hints and not the actual answer. Thank you
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Angelin Ravi
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(Original post by everythingice)
Mg (s) + CuSO4 (aq) -> Cu (s) + MgSO4(aq)

That's the actual equation, where Magnesium displaces Copper due to it being more reactive.

For the ionic equation you'd have to look at the individual equations of each of the metals. As it's Copper (II), that means it has a charge of 2+. So as it's having electrons given to it, it's being REDUCED:

Cu2+ + 2e- -> Cu

Then the Magnesium initially has a charge of 0 but then when it displaces copper, it gains a charge of 2+. Therefore it's having electrons removed, meaning it's OXIDISED.
Mg -> Mg2+ +2e-

Hope that helped!
Thank you so much
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username1539513
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(Original post by Angelin Ravi)
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How do you do this please explain!!!
Basically what the user above me said, but to do this you need to know the elements involved including what the sulfate ion is. Then you have to figure out how it would react with copper and what it forms which you can do by looking at the electrons it has spare

How much do you know about ionic equations?
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Angelin Ravi
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I do know about ionic equations. I do know that ionic equation is a simplified equation for a reaction involving ionic substances. Only those ions which take part in the reaction.
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username1539513
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(Original post by Angelin Ravi)
I do know about ionic equations. I do know that ionic equation is a simplified equation for a reaction involving ionic substances. Only those ions which take part in the reaction.
Okay, so what was confusing you about the question?
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Angelin Ravi
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Idk when I saw the question I just kinda panicked so yeah
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