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    I'm planning to do two AEA's for economics and english next year. my teachers want me too, and i would be very interested in doing them...

    but do people think these are a waste of time? How hard is it really to pass these exams? Is it worth it for applying for unis, etc. How much extra work is really involved.

    Just need some advice....
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    They're not a waste of time so long as you think you are good enough at that subject to pass an AEA. A little extra reading may be needed, but it's definitely worth having under your belt if you can gain a merit or distinction in it.
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    (Original post by The Anthropologist)
    They're not a waste of time so long as you think you are good enough at that subject to pass an AEA. A little extra reading may be needed, but it's definitely worth having under your belt if you can gain a merit or distinction in it.
    :dito:

    They're also useful if you do not meet your university offer (not that I'm saying you will ) because you have a qualification in addition to your AS/A levels

    The AEAs are hard but then they are supposed to be as they are intended for people who are expected to get the top grades at A level.

    I did Critical Thinking and college ran 'after-school' sessions a few times. It's quite hard to read up on Critical Thinking for the exam but for your subjects, the extra reading may come in useful
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    I'll tell you whether they were worth the effort on results day. But here is a thread about them: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=425809.
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    (Original post by Emzzz)
    I'm planning to do two AEA's for economics and english next year. my teachers want me too, and i would be very interested in doing them...

    but do people think these are a waste of time? How hard is it really to pass these exams? Is it worth it for applying for unis, etc. How much extra work is really involved.

    Just need some advice....
    I'd say that since you're contemplating applying to Oxford, going for an AEA would be a good choice for you. They'd show the interviewers that you like to push yourself beyond the A-Level syllabi, which is something they really like

    The difficulty of the papers is just the same as any other exam - some people will undoubtedly find the exams easy and some (at least the majority) will find them challenging, but they are designed to stretch you. They go beyond the A-Level syllabi slightly, and if you get a Merit or Distinction, it says reams about your aptitude for the subject(s), as well as your commitment to them
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    ^ How much preparation can you do for a French AEA?
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    (Original post by city_chic)
    ^ How much preparation can you do for a French AEA?
    There's loads you can do. For the reading section, you should try to read as much as possible. What you read will be unlikely to come up, but as long as you practise you'll be fine. This year it was an extract from "Les misérables" and a few years back it was an extract from "Germinal". You can also try translating newspaper reports from French>English. This will help you in the translation section. Then, you can do some practise with past papers so you can answer the questions correctly As for the grammar section - just learn as much grammar as you can It's just fill-in box things Listening...do lots of listening to things like radio stations etc, and for the writing, make sure that you are able to use your grammar competently, as well as being able to write in a fluent manner without having to refer to a dictionary. Learn cultural things too. This will help in your writing section. You don't want to walk into the exam like me, thinking you'll be alright with the culture thing, and get two awful questions where you don't know what to write:p:
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    I'm not a try hard or someone who enjoys work i assure u but i can say that actually i did quite enjoy doing the english AEA this year. It was liberating to be able to break those irritating assessment objectives (u know the A01iiiiiiiiiiiiii and A02iiiiiiiiii etc lol) and just write what i wanted to. The creative task is fun as well. I did no prep for it, just came in and did it and, actually, its one of the results im most desperate to find out! Oh and i'd heard also that they are phasing the AEA's out because not enough people apply for them to justify the time to write them etc. so do em while u can! Hope this helps.
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    If you're expecting to get an A at the A-Level, you've got nothing to lose by doing the AEA.

    If you don't pass, you don't need to declare it to employers etc, as is the case with any U grade subject. And it's unlikely (but not impossible) for it to be part of UCAS offers.

    But, saying that, if you do pass, it looks great - there's no 'low' grade pass (like E at A-Level for example). Just takes up 3 hours of your time when everyone else has broken up for the Summer really!

    That's my two cents. (I did Maths and Chemistry, doubt I'll get anything in Maths, really hoping I'll get something in Chemistry!)

    || Sam
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    (Original post by Neo)
    I'm not a try hard or someone who enjoys work i assure u but i can say that actually i did quite enjoy doing the english AEA this year. It was liberating to be able to break those irritating assessment objectives (u know the A01iiiiiiiiiiiiii and A02iiiiiiiiii etc lol) and just write what i wanted to. The creative task is fun as well. I did no prep for it, just came in and did it and, actually, its one of the results im most desperate to find out! Oh and i'd heard also that they are phasing the AEA's out because not enough people apply for them to justify the time to write them etc. so do em while u can! Hope this helps.
    :ditto: I'm most excited to find out how I did. Even if I fail the French AEA, I'll be happy because I took on a big challenge

    By the way, in the English AEA, are there two questions - one for Literature and one for Language, or do you have to pull together both subjects' techniques and use skills from both?:confused:
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    (Original post by gooner1592)
    There's loads you can do. For the reading section, you should try to read as much as possible. What you read will be unlikely to come up, but as long as you practise you'll be fine. This year it was an extract from "Les misérables" and a few years back it was an extract from "Germinal". You can also try translating newspaper reports from French>English. This will help you in the translation section. Then, you can do some practise with past papers so you can answer the questions correctly As for the grammar section - just learn as much grammar as you can It's just fill-in box things Listening...do lots of listening to things like radio stations etc, and for the writing, make sure that you are able to use your grammar competently, as well as being able to write in a fluent manner without having to refer to a dictionary. Learn cultural things too. This will help in your writing section. You don't want to walk into the exam like me, thinking you'll be alright with the culture thing, and get two awful questions where you don't know what to write:p:
    So basically the same as the AS/A2 lol.
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    (Original post by city_chic)
    So basically the same as the AS/A2 lol.
    ;yes; And don't think you're at a disadvantage because you don't do A-Level French with OCR either.
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    (Original post by gooner1592)
    :ditto: I'm most excited to find out how I did. Even if I fail the French AEA, I'll be happy because I took on a big challenge

    By the way, in the English AEA, are there two questions - one for Literature and one for Language, or do you have to pull together both subjects' techniques and use skills from both?:confused:
    It is a paper geared towards candidates doing language or literature. There are two questions. One is a generic comparison between two or more of the primary sources and the second question is either one of 6 exploration questions in which you use the methods described in a secondary source to analyse primary ones or a creative question in which you rewrite one of the primary sources in another format i.e. poem as an interview.

    Ne way there's loads of threads on it so check them out
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    (Original post by gooner1592)
    ;yes; And don't think you're at a disadvantage because you don't do A-Level French with OCR either.
    Why, does OCR suck or something? Lol. Would it be worth me doing an AEA next summer though, seeing as (hopefully) I'll be applying this year?
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    (Original post by Neo)
    It is a paper geared towards candidates doing language or literature. There are two questions. One is a generic comparison between two or more of the primary sources and the second question is either one of 6 exploration questions in which you use the methods described in a secondary source to analyse primary ones or a creative question in which you rewrite one of the primary sources in another format i.e. poem as an interview.

    Ne way there's loads of threads on it so check them out
    Shall do, though that description pretty much puts me off:p: It looks quite heavy!:p: I'll stick to just doing the German one next year:cool:
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    (Original post by city_chic)
    Why, does OCR suck or something? Lol. Would it be worth me doing an AEA next summer though, seeing as (hopefully) I'll be applying this year?
    No, what I mean is, just because you're on OCR, it doesn't mean you're at a disadvantage because of the content of the exam - as there will be differences in the A-Level specifications

    And yeah, you should still do the AEA next year. The exams are designed to be taken at the end of year 13 anyways I just took it early because I wanted a challenge.
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    i assure u, after reading back what i wrote, i made it sound a lot more complex than it is!
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    (Original post by Neo)
    i assure u, after reading back what i wrote, i made it sound a lot more complex than it is!
    :p: Well, I'll have a look into it a little more anyways I'm now going to have a gander at the specimen material from the OCR website
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    (Original post by gooner1592)
    No, what I mean is, just because you're on OCR, it doesn't mean you're at a disadvantage because of the content of the exam - as there will be differences in the A-Level specifications

    And yeah, you should still do the AEA next year. The exams are designed to be taken at the end of year 13 anyways I just took it early because I wanted a challenge.
    Ah right, okay lol. I'll have to think about it. Tbh I don't want too much extra stress :p:
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    Hey thanks for everyone for your great advice!

    You convinced me that I should give it a shot, and hope for the best!

    thanks a lot
 
 
 

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