Am I qualified to do a doctorate in econ?

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    I graduated with a bachelors in economics and politics in 2015. I took all the quantitative modules available to econ undergrads. Namely, Mathematics I and II, Statistics I and II, Intro to Econometrics, Intro, Intermediate and Advanced Micro and Macro. To my knowledge, I did as much quantitative work as straight econ graduates do.

    I finished my Master's in Political Economy this year. There were no quantitative modules except for research methods.

    My question is whether it is possible to do a PhD in economics straight away (I wanted to do a phd in politics but the prospects for econ PhDs are pretty good and the prospects for phds in politics are on par with drug addicts who live with their moms)

    I got a first in my undergrad btw, so I'm pretty comfortable with the mathematics/stats used in econ but I have little clue as to the level that's required.

    Current/past econ PhDs - help a brother out?
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    (Original post by RainbowMan)
    ..............
    Depends entirely what your research proposal is. I don't suppose there are many funded Economics PhDs, not like the sciences when you pretty much sign up for a pre-set piece of research work that fits in a larger scheme. You could do a PhD on the economics of something historical and barely deal with numbers at all, and get in with a history degree. If you want to do something hardcore quantish - then you maybe won't get an offer. There's not really such a thing as 'qualified for a PhD' in the social sciences if you have a Masters, you have to be qualified to do what is required to complete your research proposal.
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    (Original post by RainbowMan)
    I graduated with a bachelors in economics and politics in 2015. I took all the quantitative modules available to econ undergrads. Namely, Mathematics I and II, Statistics I and II, Intro to Econometrics, Intro, Intermediate and Advanced Micro and Macro. To my knowledge, I did as much quantitative work as straight econ graduates do.

    I finished my Master's in Political Economy this year. There were no quantitative modules except for research methods.

    My question is whether it is possible to do a PhD in economics straight away (I wanted to do a phd in politics but the prospects for econ PhDs are pretty good and the prospects for phds in politics are on par with drug addicts who live with their moms)

    I got a first in my undergrad btw, so I'm pretty comfortable with the mathematics/stats used in econ but I have little clue as to the level that's required.

    Current/past econ PhDs - help a brother out?
    ... How old are you? :rofl:
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    (Original post by Rhaenys10)
    ... How old are you? :rofl:
    23, why?
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    (Original post by threeportdrift)
    Depends entirely what your research proposal is. I don't suppose there are many funded Economics PhDs, not like the sciences when you pretty much sign up for a pre-set piece of research work that fits in a larger scheme. You could do a PhD on the economics of something historical and barely deal with numbers at all, and get in with a history degree. If you want to do something hardcore quantish - then you maybe won't get an offer. There's not really such a thing as 'qualified for a PhD' in the social sciences if you have a Masters, you have to be qualified to do what is required to complete your research proposal.
    As I understand it, there is a certain number of maths modules one needs to have completed before applying for a Master's in Economics. We were advised in undergrad to take a fair mount of quantitative modules or else we wouldn't be able to do a Masters later on (unless it was for non-econ graduates).

    I had assumed something similar holds for PhDs.

    I think I may need to talk to my profs about this but I can write a strong research proposal in transport economics which is not hardcore quant but definitely not "literary economics".

    I really doubt that you can do a phd in econ with a history degree.
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    It depends on your research proposal and fit with potential supervisor. IPE is extremely non quant and a niche topic within economics. Compared to main topics such as macro monetary economics or micro regulation/industrial econ at most departments, IPE receives less funding and status. Did you get a distinction?
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    (Original post by RainbowMan)
    23, why?
    Dunno, thought you were younger. Didn't know you were an Econ genius tho :rofl:
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    (Original post by Rhaenys10)
    Dunno, thought you were younger. Didn't know you were an Econ genius tho :rofl:
    Now I'm starting to get offended. How much younger?! and why?! I just turned 23, that's not young.

    I'm just studious, I'm not a genius. Stop taking the piss.
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    (Original post by Tcannon)
    It depends on your research proposal and fit with potential supervisor. IPE is extremely non quant and a niche topic within economics. Compared to main topics such as macro monetary economics or micro regulation/industrial econ at most departments, IPE receives less funding and status. Did you get a distinction?
    No chance to do do it in IPE, it's virtually politics territory (no demand).

    Yes.

    I've seen first year phd modules and my guess is it would be impossible to do the coursework if you're not trained in advanced maths.
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    (Original post by RainbowMan)
    Now I'm starting to get offended. How much younger?! and why?! I just turned 23, that's not young.

    I'm just studious, I'm not a genius. Stop taking the piss.
    I'm not lol
    Well to my mind, everyone who'd like to do a PhD is pretty damn intelligent
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    (Original post by RainbowMan)
    As I understand it, there is a certain number of maths modules one needs to have completed before applying for a Master's in Economics. We were advised in undergrad to take a fair mount of quantitative modules or else we wouldn't be able to do a Masters later on (unless it was for non-econ graduates).

    I had assumed something similar holds for PhDs.

    I think I may need to talk to my profs about this but I can write a strong research proposal in transport economics which is not hardcore quant but definitely not "literary economics".

    I really doubt that you can do a phd in econ with a history degree.
    You don't get a PhD in a subject, you just get a PhD. How you describe it is up to you. Depending on the circumstances of who I am talking to, or what job I am applying for, I can describe my PhD, entirely honestly, as in -

    International Relations
    Politics
    Philosophy
    Politics and Philosophy
    Philosophy and Politics
    Ethical policy making
    Humanitarian Intervention
    A critique of the UN
    etc etc.

    I have no certificate that describes a subject, and the name of the Department in the University is no help, it's an acronym with one additional subject I could lob in!

    So as long as you can convince the admissions staff you have the skills necessary to complete your research proposal you can get a PhD 'in' anything.
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    You need more math training, I suggest studying a graduate econometrics textbook (like Green or White or Hansen).

    Focus on these things:

    +More econometrics (advanced, OLS, GMM, IV, Panel Data, Non Parametric, Bootstrapping)
    + More linear algebra
    + More statistical theory (martingales, error correction representation, law of large numbers, probability theory, set theory)
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    It will be hard for you to get onto a standard Economics course without advanced training in Econometrics and intermediate training in Mathematics.

    Maybe do a MSc in econometrics, it will help your application.

    PhD Economics is basically math, nothing but math. Well that's what it was the University of Surrey (first year).
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    (Original post by threeportdrift)
    You don't get a PhD in a subject, you just get a PhD. How you describe it is up to you. Depending on the circumstances of who I am talking to, or what job I am applying for, I can describe my PhD, entirely honestly, as in -

    International Relations
    Politics
    Philosophy
    Politics and Philosophy
    Philosophy and Politics
    Ethical policy making
    Humanitarian Intervention
    A critique of the UN
    etc etc.

    I have no certificate that describes a subject, and the name of the Department in the University is no help, it's an acronym with one additional subject I could lob in!

    So as long as you can convince the admissions staff you have the skills necessary to complete your research proposal you can get a PhD 'in' anything.
    This is the first year of the phd in econ at Cam

    http://www.econ.cam.ac.uk/graduate/phd/

    There are compulsory modules like econometrics/macro/micro which if you aren't familiar with probability theory and calculus, you're not going to be able to pass.

    The research proposal and the dissertation, I grant, are. in some sense, the phd. But it's not about if I can convicne them of anything, it's whether I'd struggle to do the coursework. Which it looks like that I will.
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    (Original post by rambapa)
    It will be hard for you to get onto a standard Economics course without advanced training in Econometrics and intermediate training in Mathematics.

    Maybe do a MSc in econometrics, it will help your application.

    PhD Economics is basically math, nothing but math. Well that's what it was the University of Surrey (first year).
    Yeah I sort of figured by now looking at various phd programmes.
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    (Original post by RainbowMan)
    Yeah I sort of figured by now looking at various phd programmes.
    What's worse is I'm doing a PhD in economics without having ever studied economics before.

    My background is math, finance and econometrics.
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    (Original post by RainbowMan)
    This is the first year of the phd in econ at Cam

    http://www.econ.cam.ac.uk/graduate/phd/

    There are compulsory modules like econometrics/macro/micro which if you aren't familiar with probability theory and calculus, you're not going to be able to pass.

    The research proposal and the dissertation, I grant, are. in some sense, the phd. But it's not about if I can convicne them of anything, it's whether I'd struggle to do the coursework. Which it looks like that I will.
    Look at the Land Ec and Geography departments and see if they have the same process. Cam is very good at allowing Supervision across departments, even across Universities. I suspect you could do your preferred research just as well with them, without the mandatory Econ packages (which i've never heard of on any other Cam PhD, other than in the sciences and some basic research methods courses).
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    (Original post by threeportdrift)
    You don't get a PhD in a subject, you just get a PhD. How you describe it is up to you. in!

    So as long as you can convince the admissions staff you have the skills necessary to complete your research proposal you can get a PhD 'in' anything.
    I agree entirely with this. Again, depending on who I'm talking to, my PhD is in:

    Psychology, Sociology, Politics, Economics, Nutrition, Anthropology, Epidemiology or Semiotics.

    The title of the qualification is of no relevance at all. All PhDs are interdisciplinary to some degree.
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    (Original post by BasicMistake)
    Sounds totally legit.
    Yes, my services are very legit. You can try me
 
 
 
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