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Are BScs always more employable than BAs? watch

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    This is something that's come up a lot, is there any truth in it?
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    (Original post by Ellie4)
    This is something that's come up a lot, is there any truth in it?
    Never even thought about it
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    (Original post by shiny)
    Never even thought about it
    Aren't all degrees from Cam BAs?
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    (Original post by Ellie4)
    Aren't all degrees from Cam BAs?
    Yep

    Still, BA vs BSc's I doubt many employers are particularly fussed about it!
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    (Original post by shiny)
    Still, BA vs BSc's I doubt many employers are particularly fussed about it!
    When there is a choice in a subject (e.g. Geog, Econ etc...) then some employers might favour a BSc because it suggests that you studies more "scientific" content. When it comes to accounting etc... Iwould think that a BSc would be favoured for its implied maths content.
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    (Original post by Leekey)
    When there is a choice in a subject (e.g. Geog, Econ etc...) then some employers might favour a BSc because it suggests that you studies more "scientific" content. When it comes to accounting etc... Iwould think that a BSc would be favoured for its implied maths content.
    to be quite simple, it is ********...

    with economics i have been told by all universities that BA or BSC classification is irrelevant. the course im gonna be studying is a BA and i have exactly the same optional maths content to choose as someone who does a Bsc at another university. The classification is at the disgretion of the university and does not imply whether it is more "scientif" or not. however, obviously if u studies maths or MAYBE physics, it would seem a little odd for a uni to classify the degree as a BA. employers do NOT care with economics, for sure, whether it is a BA or Bsc, although they may be interested in the topics you were taught, they would not think less of someone simply on the grounds of degree classification.
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    (Original post by Ellie4)
    Aren't all degrees from Cam BAs?
    just noticed someone else wrote this....very good point. They are considered one of the best places to do economics in the country, do you think a candidate for a job would be frowned upon for getting a BA from cambridge????? no.
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    (Original post by clare_m)
    to be quite simple, it is ********...

    with economics i have been told by all universities that BA or BSC classification is irrelevant. the course im gonna be studying is a BA and i have exactly the same optional maths content to choose as someone who does a Bsc at another university. The classification is at the disgretion of the university and does not imply whether it is more "scientif" or not. however, obviously if u studies maths or MAYBE physics, it would seem a little odd for a uni to classify the degree as a BA. employers do NOT care with economics, for sure, whether it is a BA or Bsc, although they may be interested in the topics you were taught, they would not think less of someone simply on the grounds of degree classification.
    I was under the impression that a large number of BSc courses required A-Level maths because of the maths content whereas their equivalent BA course did not require it due to the reduced maths content (e.g. Reading who offer both but the BSc requires maths)?!? :confused:
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    (Original post by clare_m)
    just noticed someone else wrote this....very good point. They are considered one of the best places to do economics in the country, do you think a candidate for a job would be frowned upon for getting a BA from cambridge????? no.
    Not when an they see the "Cantab" next to the degree title and realise that they studied at a place which does not award BSc degree's for anything irrespective of course content.
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    yeah i realise that, i applied and turned them down - crap uni! that would be simply to separate the two "types" of people so that the uni can organise who wants to do the maths stuff and who doesnt. at other uni's however, who choose to only run one course (BA or BSC), the majority of modules are usually optional so that people can choose how much maths they do. For example when i go to exeter there is a module in the first year called "basic mathematical economics". this is a module designed only for those who have done a-level maths, however the degree will still be classified as a BA - thats why i said employers would usually ASK what topics you have studied, rather than look at classification as it is rather vague...
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    (Original post by clare_m)
    yeah i realise that, i applied and turned them down - crap uni! that would be simply to separate the two "types" of people so that the uni can organise who wants to do the maths stuff and who doesnt. at other uni's however, who choose to only run one course (BA or BSC), the majority of modules are usually optional so that people can choose how much maths they do. For example when i go to exeter there is a module in the first year called "basic mathematical economics". this is a module designed only for those who have done a-level maths, however the degree will still be classified as a BA - thats why i said employers would usually ASK what topics you have studied, rather than look at classification as it is rather vague...
    Valid point but I still think that (not just for Econ) BSc are generally more reasuring to employers than BA. It probably doesnt actually make any difference in the majority of cases but if there is a difference, I would expect favour to go towards BSc's.
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    (Original post by Leekey)
    Valid point but I still think that (not just for Econ) BSc are generally more reasuring to employers than BA. It probably doesnt actually make any difference in the majority of cases but if there is a difference, I would expect favour to go towards BSc's.
    What about with a subject like geog, where if you chose a BA or a BSc, you actually study very different things?
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    are you studying a Bsc at reading by any chance, lol :cool:
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    (Original post by Ellie4)
    What about with a subject like geog, where if you chose a BA or a BSc, you actually study very different things?
    No idea specifically (Jools is the best person to ask). I would however expect that it would entirely depend upon the job and how much your degree directly relates to what your going to be doing.
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    (Original post by Leekey)
    No idea specifically (Jools is the best person to ask). I would however expect that it would entirely depend upon the job and how much your degree directly relates to what your going to be doing.
    Hehe, maybe I'll harass Jools with more PMs
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    (Original post by clare_m)
    are you studying a Bsc at reading by any chance, lol :cool:
    Hopefully an MEng or MSc at Edinburgh.
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    Not sure about employability...but whether a degree is classified as BA or BSc depends on the electives...for example, psychology: A student studying for a BSc is most likely to choose modules/units from a science discipline, such as maths, biology etc, whereas a student studying for a BA is most likely to choose humanities/arts modules.

    I don't think it matters that much but if a psychology student went for a job in neuroscience I imagine it would be advantageous to have a BSc rather than a BA.
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    I think a Bsc suggests that you have a more numerate degree.
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    I've asked quite alot of people about this recently (for economics) and they all seem to say it doesn't matter at all, except my dad who would much rather see me doing "a science degree", but he's one from the old skool.
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    (Original post by jumpunderaboat)
    I've asked quite alot of people about this recently (for economics) and they all seem to say it doesn't matter at all, except my dad who would much rather see me doing "a science degree", but he's one from the old skool.
    In stark contrast to my parnts who belive that the *ONLY* academic subjects ar English, History and Languages (yes thats right...no maths)!!! :rolleyes: I think they would be over the moon if I gave in and switched to History!!!
 
 
 
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