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    I have always been hugely intrigued, ever since I have watched star trek, and read about the prospect of faster than light travel. I find the entire concept fascinating and wanted to make a thread where people can put forward any interesting theories they have about how, if it can be achieved. Or possibly any theories about it being impossible (dont destroy my dreams too much, please!) I hope there are some people out there who are nearly as interested by the concept as I am. I felt this was the best way to perhaps develop my own theories on how superlight speeds might one day be achieved. Thanks for the contributions.

    -Robbie.
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    faster than light travel is perfectly possible, as long as you dont cross the speed of light.
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    My top speed is Warp 10!
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    (Original post by elpaw)
    faster than light travel is perfectly possible, as long as you dont cross the speed of light.
    Correct. Even in star trek they don't actually go faster than light. The most promising way of doing it I believe is to fold time/space. Although I can't see much of that being done in our lifetime I would at least like us to get a correct theory relating to faster than light travel.
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    if you go warp 10, you can every where in a moment. (i have seen it on an episode of star trek).
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    (Original post by elpaw)
    faster than light travel is perfectly possible, as long as you dont cross the speed of light.
    Well...

    Faster than light travels in a medium is possible (thus explaining Cerenkov radiation), but it is not possible to travel faster than the speed of light in a vacuum (assuming old Albert was right in his thinking )
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    (Original post by SuperGeek)
    if you go warp 10, you can every where in a moment. (i have seen it on an episode of star trek).
    i thought star trek was just fiction..
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    (Original post by polthegael)
    but it is not possible to travel faster than the speed of light in a vacuum (assuming old Albert was right in his thinking )
    i guess you've never heard of tachyons then

    it is perfectly possible to travel faster than light, as long as you dont cross the light barrier (from both directions) - the speed of light is an asymptote.
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    (Original post by elpaw)
    it is perfectly possible to travel faster than light, as long as you dont cross the light barrier (from both directions) - the speed of light is an asymptote.
    I am an asymptote skipper
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    This may seem very stupid to the more advance Physicists here, but I have been improving my understanding of momentum and related Physics. IF we could develop a device for instant transportation of matter, and say, we propelled an apple in circular tracks at near light speed. If we then transported (removed) half of the apple matter, would the apple instantly conserve momentum and cross the light threshold, effectively vanishing and moving at a warp factor?

    Just a reminder: you are entitled to scream at my idiocy...
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    (Original post by RobbieC)
    This may seem very stupid to the more advance Physicists here, but I have been improving my understanding of momentum and related Physics. IF we could develop a device for instant transportation of matter, and say, we propelled an apple in circular tracks at near light speed. If we then transported (removed) half of the apple matter, would the apple instantly conserve momentum and cross the light threshold, effectively vanishing and moving at a warp factor?

    Just a reminder: you are entitled to scream at my idiocy...
    It's not a daft question...but at near-light speeds, the mass of an object increases, so conservation of momentum can't propel it beyond the light barrier (actually, someone back me up on this 'cause relativity gives me a headache).

    I was reading a few days ago about the Alcubierre drive. Sounds like a cool concept.
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    (Original post by RobbieC)
    This may seem very stupid to the more advance Physicists here, but I have been improving my understanding of momentum and related Physics. IF we could develop a device for instant transportation of matter, and say, we propelled an apple in circular tracks at near light speed. If we then transported (removed) half of the apple matter, would the apple instantly conserve momentum and cross the light threshold, effectively vanishing and moving at a warp factor?

    Just a reminder: you are entitled to scream at my idiocy...
    the reletavistic momentum is given by mv/sqrt(1-v²/c²), (which at low speeds approximates to the newtonian mv). in your experiment, momentum is still conserved, but the remaining apple will still be at sub-luminar speed.
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    (Original post by Squishy)
    It's not a daft question...but at near-light speeds, the mass of an object increases, so conservation of momentum can't propel it beyond the light barrier (actually, someone back me up on this 'cause relativity gives me a headache).

    I was reading a few days ago about the Alcubierre drive. Sounds like a cool concept.
    Yeah I think that's right. But it err confuses me because:

    The mass halves, and so increased speed means it gains relative mass. And so it slows down. But then it has reduced mass, so it speeds up. Does this all happen instantaneously then?
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    (Original post by Squishy)
    It's not a daft question...but at near-light speeds, the mass of an object increases, so conservation of momentum can't propel it beyond the light barrier (actually, someone back me up on this 'cause relativity gives me a headache).

    I was reading a few days ago about the Alcubierre drive. Sounds like a cool concept.
    http://www2.slac.stanford.edu/vvc/th...elativity.html

    But who says E = mc squared is not obeyed at say 0.9999999999999999c? Unless it's been proven of course.

    It's all relative.
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    (Original post by NDGAARONDI)
    But who says E = mc squared is not obeyed at say 0.9999999999999999c?
    E=mc² doesnt apply at speeds. it is the rest energy/mass.
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    (Original post by fishpaste)
    Yeah I think that's right. But it err confuses me because:

    The mass halves, and so increased speed means it gains relative mass. And so it slows down. But then it has reduced mass, so it speeds up. Does this all happen instantaneously then?
    It must find equilibrium at some speed...oh dear, my brain...
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    Whoo! I perplexed clever people! I am going to read a Brief History of time...

    Lol...

    Thanks for the link Squishy! If I knew how to give rep, I would give you a bunch for just being cool! You too Fishpaste! MY IDOLS!

    I'm not drunk, but I guess I could be seen to be
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    (Original post by elpaw)
    i guess you've never heard of tachyons then

    it is perfectly possible to travel faster than light, as long as you dont cross the light barrier (from both directions) - the speed of light is an asymptote.
    I have, of course. Gott or someone had that theory of having matter and antimatter universes seperated by distance and a tachyon universe seperated from the others by time.

    What practical use is there for tachyons, however? As they cannot be slowed to the speed of light in a vacuum they are constantly travelling through time as we know it. So we can't see them or use them in any way.
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    (Original post by polthegael)
    I have, of course. Gott or someone had that theory of having matter and antimatter universes seperated by distance and a tachyon universe seperated from the others by time.

    What practical use is there for tachyons, however? As they cannot be slowed to the speed of light in a vacuum they are constantly travelling through time as we know it. So we can't see them or use them in any way.
    what practical use is there for the tau neutrino or the strange quark?

    positrons are theorised (in one of feynmann's theories) to be tachyonic electrons
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    Aren't most time travel theories based around tachyons, and the study of, hence you sort of answered your own question.

    I think the fact that they are in a state of flux would imply that time travel is possible? @[email protected] YAY!
 
 
 
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