BOYCOTTING the hijab hypocrisy?- What do you think?

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    Disclaimer: I am against forcing women to wear the hijab 100% and believe it should be a choice like most rational human beings.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/08/sp...ijab.html?_r=0

    Now let me begin by outlining the story. Several female chess players such as
    Nazi P- Barnes have refused to travel to Iran, due to the law on a hijab being mandatory for women. She argues he will not support "opression" by conforming to these strict rules. Ofcourse many have come and supported her, however many have come out arguing despite her pure intentions the consequences are potentially the opposite of what she advocates. -
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/articl...ips-over-hijab

    Firstly the fact that there is a chess competition for females in Iran is quite significant, as chess was banned for about a decade. Several Iranian women in the articles I have linked have come out and said this so called "boycott" was unnecessary and impedes Iranian women from attaining more rights and freedoms. Instead this so-called act of defiance will simply play into the hands of Iranian hardliners, who will show this proves the West wants to keep defying Iran in all aspects.It might lead to less funding for women's sport, which has improved immensely in the past decade. We must really ask if Nazi's act of defiance is really going to change anything, and the answer is no. All it does is bring controversy on a chess tournament and plays into the hands on Iranian hardliners, who want to see this rhetoric espoused from Western nations to keep Iranian women at home. However Iranian women will always strive to prove the fundamentalists wrong, through their valour. Up to 60% of Iran's university population is infact female-- http://monitor.icef.com/2015/12/iran...ming-now-what/


    Furthermore, this act of boycotting made me wonder if the same would occur if the normal hijab or veil became publicly banned in France. In this case women who chose to wear it would be forced to take it off, akin to women in Iran being forced to put it on. It could well become a reality in France for example as former French primeminster Nicholas Sarkozy has announced on his campaign trail.--
    https://www.thelocal.fr/20161005/fra...arkozy-serious
    I just wonder if the same women would come out and boycott the French chess tournaments for women, if the hijab were banned, and I can't particularly imagine them doing so.

    Finally I would like to make the point of the hypocrisy of right wingers. Now again I REITERATE I am 100% against forcing one to wear the hijab, yet it is quite hysterical how right wingers want you to adhere to the values of their land (e.g. Sarcozy), but are somehow against it when other nations want people to adhere to their laws,culture and customs. Just a simple observation.

    TLDR: Women's chess tournament in Iran. Some women are against it because you must wear the hijab. Consequences are more detrimental than progressive if this happens for Iranian women.

    Thoughts?
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    I vowed to never be forced to wear something that I don't want to wear again (I previously lived in Saudi) but if doing so would help women who are greatly disadvantaged in a fight for their rights, I would do it for them. Boycotting the competition won't get the desired results for those who are against the compulsory hijab, rather it will do the opposite and restrict Iranian women further. In a way, it would be worst than boycotting a tournament in France if the hijab is banned, as French women do not need tournaments such as these to improve their situation and aren't facing the same restriction. But yes, I agree that such a ban is unlikely to happen, which is hypocritical.

    Those who are boycotting the tournament probably have very good intentions, but the results will be bad.
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    This is why I hate the Shairah law because it's the best way to exploit men and women and the (most of them)people who implemented these(as well as some qadis) aren't devout Islamic people so what's the point of them being in charge of the Shariah Law.

    Religion, as much as I love it, shouldn't be part of the system of the country because as Hobbes states we are "hopelessly, seeking power over power" so this gives important people the opportunity, especially men, the chance to do whatever they want. These people are drinking alcohol and dancing around with prostitutes are the same people who send people to be stoned for committing a non-Islamic action.

    I'm glad these women are doing this, they shouldn't be forced to wear something they don't want to. This is the start of improving the name of Religion and making the public realise it's not Religion's fault for anything but rather it's the people who choose to use it inappropriately.
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    First of all, if people bother trying to go to Iran and visit the country and see what it's like. Things would be A LOT different.

    In Iran there are two types of women (I'm generalizing of course) those that wear a proper Islamic dress (chador) and those that just barely follow the dress code. the majority of young woman are in the second category. Iran has one of the youngest demographics in the world. I bet in 20 years time, everything will be different.

    Those in the second category take western fashion and style and pull it off in such a way so as to not be pulled over by the Islamic Police who patrol areas like Tajrish Market in Tehran. the irony is, their Islamic dress is hardly Islamic. A thin designer scarf loosely draped over the head is the norm, with a tight trench coat and skinny jeans.

    Of course the situation isn't ideal, but women work with what they've got to work with and most of the time they get away with it. Of course occasionally you hear something shocking on the news about a woman stoned to death etc etc. but in big cities like Tehran, this doesn't happen.

    the boycott won't change anything. a waste of time tbh. and tbh, you go into a foreign country and you obey their customs, however bad they seem.
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    (Original post by homeland.lsw)
    Iran has one of the youngest demographics in the world.
    Now that's not true, Iran has a very low birth rate, and thus actually quite an old population - its average age is around 28 years old, compared to an average age of 18 years old in many African countries (as low as 15 years old in Niger); although this is still much younger than European nations, with median ages around 45 years old.
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    (Original post by WBZ144)
    I vowed to never be forced to wear something that I don't want to wear again (I previously lived in Saudi) but if doing so would help women who are greatly disadvantaged in a fight for their rights, I would do it for them. Boycotting the competition won't get the desired results for those who are against the compulsory hijab, rather it will do the opposite and restrict Iranian women further. In a way, it would be worst than boycotting a tournament in France if the hijab is banned, as French women do not need tournaments such as these to improve their situation and aren't facing the same restriction. But yes, I agree that such a ban is unlikely to happen, which is hypocritical.

    Those who are boycotting the tournament probably have very good intentions, but the results will be bad.
    Yes I agree. The main point of my argument is that this so called boycott is counter productive for women's rights in Iran.
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    i think it's kind of hot that iranian women can be called nazi
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    (Original post by Defraction)
    This is why I hate the Shairah law because it's the best way to exploit men and women and the (most of them)people who implemented these(as well as some qadis) aren't devout Islamic people so what's the point of them being in charge of the Shariah Law.

    Religion, as much as I love it, shouldn't be part of the system of the country because as Hobbes states we are "hopelessly, seeking power over power" so this gives important people the opportunity, especially men, the chance to do whatever they want. These people are drinking alcohol and dancing around with prostitutes are the same people who send people to be stoned for committing a non-Islamic action.

    I'm glad these women are doing this, they shouldn't be forced to wear something they don't want to. This is the start of improving the name of Religion and making the public realise it's not Religion's fault for anything but rather it's the people who choose to use it inappropriately.
    But this act of protest will simply make the situation worse, as I have highlighted in my argument above. What is most likely to happen is that in a few days this will never be talked about again. However if they did go to Iran, it would be historic for Iranian women's chess as it would I believe be the first major international chess competition for women.
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    (Original post by PussyGrabber9000)
    i think it's kind of hot that iranian women can be called nazi
    The female called "nazi" is of Georgian descent and is an American citizen. Her name is also pronounced "Nasi" I believe. She is not Iranian.
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    (Original post by homeland.lsw)
    First of all, if people bother trying to go to Iran and visit the country and see what it's like. Things would be A LOT different.

    In Iran there are two types of women (I'm generalizing of course) those that wear a proper Islamic dress (chador) and those that just barely follow the dress code. the majority of young woman are in the second category. Iran has one of the youngest demographics in the world. I bet in 20 years time, everything will be different.

    Those in the second category take western fashion and style and pull it off in such a way so as to not be pulled over by the Islamic Police who patrol areas like Tajrish Market in Tehran. the irony is, their Islamic dress is hardly Islamic. A thin designer scarf loosely draped over the head is the norm, with a tight trench coat and skinny jeans.

    Of course the situation isn't ideal, but women work with what they've got to work with and most of the time they get away with it. Of course occasionally you hear something shocking on the news about a woman stoned to death etc etc. but in big cities like Tehran, this doesn't happen.

    the boycott won't change anything. a waste of time tbh. and tbh, you go into a foreign country and you obey their customs, however bad they seem.
    I agree with your whole argument. To be honest I'm sure we can find thousands of reasons why tournaments shouldn't be held in country x, y and z. But at the end of the day this is an innocent international chess competition that will help progress women's chess in Iran and I think wearing a lose piece of cloth on your head is not a big deal if it satisfies the culture of that nation.
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    Funny indeed the double standards of these people. They are full on forcing women to take off the hijab in their countries whilst complaining about them being 'forced' to wear hijab when they are abroad.

    Hey, listen, if you go to a country you have to respect its laws and culture, and if its OK for you to force women to take off their Niqabs in your countries based on what you think is right then it should be OK for Iran to do the contrary based on what it views as being right...

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    (Original post by TheTruthTeller)
    I agree with your whole argument. To be honest I'm sure we can find thousands of reasons why tournaments shouldn't be held in country x, y and z. But at the end of the day this is an innocent international chess competition that will help progress women's chess in Iran and I think wearing a lose piece of cloth on your head is not a big deal if it satisfies the culture of that nation.
    Exactly.
    Iran has been an Islamic Republic since 1979...this will not change 30+ years of history
 
 
 
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