Please review the start of this essay for my friend?

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    Hey, my friend is worried that her work is too convoluted and thinks that is a bad thing at GCSE. She was too scared to post her own work, so I have posted it for her. Be as honest as you want as she wants to know the truth about it.

    How is Boo Radley presented in Part One of To Kill A Mockingbird?’

    In Part One, Boo Radley is presented to represent themes that prove to be integral to the progression and development of To Kill A Mockingbird. He serves as a symbol of goodness shielded by an initial veil of fear, a source of education and lies at victim to the prejudiced ways of Maycomb. However, the reader understands that the intolerance faced by Boo Radley in Part One foreshadows the greater societal racism experienced by Tom Robinson in the trial of Part Two. This allows for Harper Lee to juxtapose Boo Radley and Tom Robinson to emphasise their symbolism as mockingbirds. This symbolism of a mockingbird demonstrates innocence and how justice and compassion can bypass the boundary of human colour and intolerance, as shown by Scout’s concluding benevolence towards both characters. Additionally, Lee’s comparison of the two characters and both sections of the novel allows for the story to progress from the childlike innocence of the nature and themes presented by Boo. Hence, this drives forward the darker sphere of deeper set racial and societal discrimination in Maycomb, which Tom is subject to - a microcosm for the whole of the Deep South of America.

    As a result of being subject to prejudiced rumours and misconception, Boo Radley is initially presented as a symbol of fear in Part One of To Kill A Mockingbird. Due to the community’s warped belief about Boo as an individual, it is clear that he is victimised by a town tainted by a ‘disease’ of hypocrisy and intolerance, derived from paranoia and fear of change. The noun, ‘disease’ emphasises the severity and isolating impact of Boo’s discrimination. However, this ‘disease’ seems to not have plagued the characters who are perceived to be trustworthy and hold great morale, such as Atticus. These types of characters would not dare to pass judgement or comment on the Radley situation, as they would consider their view to be unjust, being that the whole situation may not be known. Meaning that, in consequence, Miss Stephanie Crawford gossips with Jem and informs him about Boo Radley’s supposed mental instability and how he had driven ‘scissors into his parent’s leg.’ Explicitly, the brutality of these rumours allow for Boo Radley to be perceived as a monster who should be feared, however, implicitly, the violent tone signals their absurdity and lack of truth. Furthermore, it implies that Miss Stephanie fears Boo herself, as she feels the humanistic need to gossip and exaggerate, unable to give the Radley family privacy. As Boo Radley is victim to this misconception, it allows for Miss Stephanie to be considered as the ‘neighbourhood scold.’ Additionally resulting in Stephanie Crawford becoming the prejudiced gauge by which we measure other characters throughout the novel. Thus, this reflects how and why the children and other citizens appear to hold some reservations by perhaps being fearful and intolerant of Boo. Furthermore, these reservations may exist as Boo Radley appears to be presented as an example of the unknown, with the unknown being feared by the people of Maycomb. This is further implied by the citizens of Maycomb ignorantly describing Boo Radley as a ‘malevolent phantom’ and a ‘ghoul.’ With the phrases providing connotations of a feared ghost, it is eerily implied how Boo Radley is never seen, but, is undoubtedly alive. Perhaps this suggests Boo’s reluctance to be a part of Maycomb, possibly disagreeing with the segregated, judgemental and insular ways of Alabama in 1930. Boo may have decided that being considered a symbol of fear and an outsider was a better fate than feeling forced to adopt the ways of Maycomb, in order to be free of prejudice and part of the community.
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    (Original post by ?Hannah)
    Hey, my friend is worried that her work is too convoluted and thinks that is a bad thing at GCSE. She was too scared to post her own work, so I have posted it for her. Be as honest as you want as she wants to know the truth about it.
    That explanation though :rofl:
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    Yeah it's good anyway. Well written, but hard to give a mark without a mark scheme though.
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    (Original post by UWS)
    That explanation though :rofl:
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    Yeah it's good anyway.
    lol, that's what friends are for. 😂 ah, sweet, I will let her know that her essay is good
 
 
 
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