Law or Biological Sciences?!

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    I'm thinking of either studying Law or Biology at uni - but I don't know which one to choose! I find both subjects interesting but I just don't know. I know Law has great career prospects, but Biology has practical elements to it and the content is diverse. Any advise is appreciated!
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    Law careers can be followed after a degree in Biological Sciences. You do the GDL- Graduate Diploma in Law, a one year's dash though the main law subjects, ( not for the faint hearted though), followed by ,

    Either

    a paid Training Contract with a Solicitors' firm ( who may also pay for your GDL ), difficult to get:

    Or

    the 1 year BPTC ( Bar Professional Training Course) and 1 year pupillage in a Barristers' chambers - insanely competitive- ( possibly if you are lucky, having a Scholarship from an Inn for the GDL and BPTC, otherwise huge debts without indulgent rich parents)

    In both cases your academics / ECs need to be top notch - not to say spectacular especially for the Pupillage game.
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    (Original post by pickup)
    Law careers can be followed after a degree in Biological Sciences. You do the GDL- Graduate Diploma in Law, a one year's dash though the main law subjects, ( not for the faint hearted though), followed by ,

    Either

    a paid Training Contract with a Solicitors' firm ( who may also pay for your GDL ), difficult to get:

    Or

    the 1 year BPTC ( Bar Professional Training Course) and 1 year pupillage in a Barristers' chambers - insanely competitive- ( possibly if you are lucky, having a Scholarship from an Inn for the GDL and BPTC, otherwise huge debts without indulgent rich parents)

    In both cases your academics / ECs need to be top notch - not to say spectacular especially for the Pupillage game.
    I have heard about the GDL. The thing is, it's not really the "same" as a QLD because you're learning the bare minimum to practise law without any in depth study into other areas of law and I'm afraid this would put me at a disadvantage against other candidates who may an LLM.
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    (Original post by AndrewKn0x)
    I have heard about the GDL. The thing is, it's not really the "same" as a QLD because you're learning the bare minimum to practise law without any in depth study into other areas of law and I'm afraid this would put me at a disadvantage against other candidates who may an LLM.
    It really wouldn't put you at a disadvantage. There are a lot of competent, successful law converts out there in the working world. In fact, most lawyers I've spoken to have said that doing a different degree then converting would afford you with more insight than had you just stuck with law.

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    (Original post by AndrewKn0x)
    I have heard about the GDL. The thing is, it's not really the "same" as a QLD because you're learning the bare minimum to practise law without any in depth study into other areas of law and I'm afraid this would put me at a disadvantage against other candidates who may an LLM.
    As someone who recruited students into law firms for over a decade, it definitely won't put you at a disadvantage.

    Academic law and practical law are very different things.

    In fact by the time you look to complete your course, the GDL and LPC might not even exist, and instead you do what's going to be the SQE like any law student, just your course to prepare you for the SQE will be slightly longer than a law student.

    Maybe go and find a little more about the degree content and learning formats. You probably couldn't get two more different type of courses, so maybe think about how it is going to be taught and not just how intriguing the content is to you at this stage.
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    [QUOTE=AndrewKn0x;67948722]I have heard about the GDL. The thing is, it's not really the "same" as a QLD because you're learning the bare minimum to practise law without any in depth study into other areas of law and I'm afraid this would put me at a disadvantage against other candidates who may an LLM.[/QUOTE

    I believe Law Firms/chambers recruit roughly 50:50 Law and non Law graduates - indeed for some specialities non Law graduates are preferred.

    A close relative did a non Law degree, then the GDL and is now a barrister at a top London set.

    Science degrees are in demand for Intellectual Property / Patent Law. Masters are not particularly required.
 
 
 
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